Regional Council Agenda

NOTICE IS GIVEN that the next meeting of the Regional Council will be held in Council Chambers, Regional House, 1 Elizabeth Street, Tauranga on:

Tuesday 28 May 2024 COMMENCING AT 09:30 am, continuing (if required) on Wednesday 29 May 2024 COMMENCING AT 09.30 am

This meeting will be livestreamed and recorded.

The Public section of this meeting will be livestreamed and recorded and uploaded to Bay of Plenty Regional Council’s website.  Further details on this can be found after the Terms of Reference within the Agenda. Bay of Plenty Regional Council - YouTube

 

Fiona McTavish

Chief Executive, Bay of Plenty Regional Council Toi Moana

21 May 2024

 


 

Council

Membership

Chairperson

Chairman Doug Leeder

Deputy Chairperson

Cr Jane Nees

Members

All Councillors

Quorum

Seven members, consisting of half the number of members

Meeting frequency

Six weekly or as required for Annual Plan, Long Term Plan and other relevant legislative requirements

Purpose

·                Enable democratic local decision-making and action by, and on behalf of, Bay of Plenty communities.

·                Meet the current and future needs of communities for good-quality local infrastructure, local public services, and performance of regulatory functions in a way that is most cost-effective for households and businesses.

·                Set the overarching strategic direction for Bay of Plenty Regional Council as an organisation.

·                Hold ultimate responsibility for allocating financial resources across the Council.

Role

·                Address Local Electoral Act matters and Local Government Rating Act matters.

·                Oversee all matters relating to identifying and contributing to community outcomes.

·                Consider and agree on matters relating to significant new activities or areas of involvement such as infrastructure which are not the responsibility of a specific committee.

·                Provide regional leadership on key issues that require a collaborative approach between a number of parties.

·                Review and decide the Council’s electoral and representation arrangements.

·                Consider issues of regional significance which are not the responsibility of any specific standing committee or that are of such regional significance/high public interest that the full Council needs to decide on them.

·                Adopt Council’s Policy on Significance and Engagement Policy.

·                Develop, adopt and implement the Triennial Agreement, Code of Conduct and Standing Orders.

·                Consider and agree on matters relating to elected members’ remuneration.

·                Appoint the Chief Executive, and review their contract, performance and remuneration at least annually.

·                Approve all delegations to the Chief Executive, including the authority for further delegation to staff.

·                Oversee the work of all committees and subcommittees.

·                Receive and consider recommendations and matters referred to it by its committees, joint committees, subcommittees and working parties.

·                Approve membership to external bodies and organisations, including Council Controlled Organisations.

·                Develop, adopt and review policies for, and monitor the performance of, Council Controlled Organisations.

·                Monitor and review the achievement of outcomes for the Bay of Plenty Community.

·                Review and approve strategic matters relating to the sale, acquisition and development of property for the purposes of meeting Council’s organisational requirements and implement Regional Council policy.

·                Address strategic corporate matters including property and accommodation.

·                Consider and agree on the process to develop the Long Term Plan, Annual Plan and Annual Report.

·                Adopt the Long Term Plan, Annual Plan and budgets variations, and Annual Report.

·                Adopt Council policies as required by statute (for example Regional Policy Statement and Regional Land Transport Strategy) to be decided by Council or outside of committee delegations (for example infrastructure policy).

·                Develop, review and approve Council’s Financial Strategy and funding and financial policies and frameworks.

·                Institute any proceedings in the High Court that are not injunctive proceedings.

·                Exercise the powers and duties conferred or imposed on Council by the Public Works Act 1981.

Delegations from Council to committees

·                Council has a role to monitor the functioning of all committees.

·                Council will consider matters not within the delegation of any one Council committee.

·                Council may at any time, revoke or modify a delegation to a Council committee, either permanently, for a specified time or to address a specific matter, if it considers there is good reason to do so.

·                The delegations provided to committees may be further delegated to subcommittees unless the power of further delegation is restricted by Council or by statute.

·                It is accepted in making these delegations that:

·                The committees, in performing their delegated functions, powers or duties, may, without confirmation by the Council, exercise or perform them in a like manner and with the same effect as the Council itself could have exercised or performed them.

·                The delegated powers given shall at all times be subject to their current policies and principles or directions, as given by the Council from time to time.

·                The chairperson of each committee shall have the authority to exercise their discretion, as to whether or not the delegated authority of the committee be used where, in the opinion of the chairperson, circumstances warrant it.

Powers that cannot be delegated

Under Clause 32 Schedule 7 of the Local Government Act 2002, Council must make the following decisions:

·                Make a rate.

·                Make a bylaw.

·                Borrow money or purchase or dispose of assets, other than in accordance with the long-term plan.

·                Adopt the long-term plan, annual plan, or annual report.

·                Appoint a chief executive.

·                Adopt policies required to be adopted and consulted on under the Local Government Act 2002 in association with the long-term plan or developed for the purpose of the local governance statement.

·                Adopt a remuneration and employment policy.


 

Livestreaming and Recording of Meetings

Please note the Public section of this meeting is being recorded and streamed live on Bay of Plenty Regional Council’s website in accordance with Council's Live Streaming and Recording of Meetings Protocols which can be viewed on Council’s website. The recording will be archived and made publicly available on Council's website within two working days after the meeting on www.boprc.govt.nz for a period of three years (or as otherwise agreed to by Council).

All care is taken to maintain your privacy; however, as a visitor in the public gallery or as a participant at the meeting, your presence may be recorded. By remaining in the public gallery, it is understood your consent is given if your image is inadvertently broadcast.

Opinions expressed or statements made by individual persons during a meeting are not the opinions or statements of the Bay of Plenty Regional Council. Council accepts no liability for any opinions or statements made during a meeting.

 


Bay of Plenty Regional Council - Toi Moana

Governance Commitment

mō te taiao, mō ngā tāngata - our environment and our people go hand-in-hand.

 

 

We provide excellent governance when, individually and collectively, we:

·        Trust and respect each other

·        Stay strategic and focused

·        Are courageous and challenge the status quo in all we do

·        Listen to our stakeholders and value their input

·        Listen to each other to understand various perspectives

·        Act as a team who can challenge, change and add value

·        Continually evaluate what we do

 

 

TREAD LIGHTLY, THINK DEEPLY,
ACT WISELY, SPEAK KINDLY, JOURNEY TOGETHER.


Regional Council                                                                                                                28 May 2024

Recommendations in reports are not to be construed as Council policy until adopted by Council.

Agenda

E te Atua nui tonu, ko mātau ēnei e inoi atu nei ki a koe, kia tau mai te māramatanga ki a mātau whakarite mō tēnei rā, arahina hoki mātau, e eke ai te ōranga tonu ki ngā āhuatanga katoa a ngā tangata ki tō mātau rohe whānui tonu. Āmine.

 

 

“Almighty God we ask that you give us wisdom in the decisions we make here today and give us guidance in working with our regional communities to promote their social, economic, environmental and cultural well-being.  Amen”.

1.       Opening Karakia

2.       Apologies

3.       Public Forum

4.       Items not on the Agenda

5.       Order of Business

6.       Declaration of Conflicts of Interest

7.       Minutes to be Confirmed

7.1      Council Minutes (Long Term Plan Hearings) – 10, 14, 15, 16 May 2024

These minutes will be circulated separately.

8.       Reports

Decisions Required

8.1      Deliberations Report - Overview of Long Term Plan Process             3

Attachment 1 - Demographic analysis - LTP 2024 submitters                                       3

8.2      Deliberations Report - Strategic Framework Overview                       3

Attachment 1 - Strategic Direction Doc 2023 - 24 Poster A3 NOV                               3

Attachment 2 - Summary of Time Horizon and the Prioritisation of Goals diagram (002)                                                                                                                                       3

Attachment 3 - Prioritisation Principles                                                                             3

8.3      Financial Overview, Financial Strategy and Proposal for Managed Sell Down of Port of Tauranga Limited Shares                                            3

Attachment 1 - Rates Stacked Bar Graph - Median Properties                                      3

Attachment 2 - Preferred Issues and Options - Financial Summary                              3

8.4      Draft Revenue and Financing Policy - Submissions and Deliberations                                                                                                                   3

Attachment 1 - Draft Revenue and Financing Policy 2024 for consultation                3

Attachment 2 - Draft Funding Needs Analysis for consultation                                    3

Attachment 3 - Issues and Options Paper - RFP- Urban Public Transport Funding   3

8.5      A Healthy Environment - Regional Parks, Ohau wall, Wairoa River Strategy and Whakatane Harbour Bar Calling                                      3

Attachment 1 - Issues and Options - Regional Parks                                                      3

8.6      Future Ready Communities -  Rivers and Drainage Schemes             3

Attachment 1 - Issues and Options - Rainfall Gauges Waioeka and Otara Rivers       3

8.7      Connected Communities - Transport                                                     3

Attachment 1 - Community Connect - Additional Information                                      3

Attachment 2 - Tauranga School Bus Services - Additional Informaiton                     3

Attachment 3 - Tertiary Commuter Services - Additional Information                         3

8.8      Sustainable Development - Waste Management                                  3

Attachment 1 - Issues and Options - Waste minimisation and enabling a circular economy                                                                                                                                3

8.9      Community Outcome - Te Ara Poutama, The Pursuit of Excellence  3

Attachment 1 - Issues Options Paper  Te Pae Tawhiti                                                    3

8.10    Connected Communities - Community Funding                                   3

Attachment 1 - LTP 2024 OPEX Funding Requests                                                         3

Attachment 2 - 2024 letter to SLSNZ regarding Government funding                         3

Attachment 3 - Letter to Councils - CEO SLSNZ                                                             3

Attachment 4 - Additional CIF Applications LTP 2024                                                    3

8.11    Draft Fees & Charges Policy - Submissions and Deliberations            3

Attachment 1 - Issues and Options - Gravel Management Fee                                      3

Attachment 2 - Attachment 2 - Compliance charges                                                      3

8.12    Draft Rates Remission and Postponement Policies - Submissions and Deliberations                                                                                            3

Attachment 1 - Rates Remission and Postponement Policy-MFL-for consultation    3

Attachment 2 - Rates Remission and Postponement Policy-All Land-for consultation                                                                                                                                                 3

Attachment 3 - IOP Māori Freehold Land - Economic development                            3

Attachment 4 - IOP Māori Freehold Land - Marae support accommodation               3

Attachment 5 - IOP Māori Freehold Land - Adminstration and financing charges     3

Attachment 6 - IOP All Land - Contiguous properties                                                    3

8.13    Draft Development Contributions or Financial Contributions Policy - Submissions and Deliberations                                                               3

9.       Consideration of Items not on the Agenda

10.     Closing Karakia


 

 

 

Report To:

Regional Council

Meeting Date:

28 May 2024

Report Writer:

Olive McVicker, Corporate Performance Team Lead; Kumaren Perumal, Chief Financial Officer and Gillian Payne, Principal Advisor

Report Authoriser:

Mat Taylor, General Manager, Corporate

Purpose:

To provide an overview of the Long Term Plan 2024-2034 process and provides the context for Council’s decision making.

 

 

Deliberations Report - Overview of Long Term Plan Process

Executive Summary

This report provides an overview of the draft Long Term Plan 2024-2034 deliberations process.  It provides information on the context on which Council is making decisions and recommends a two-step approach to deciding on the key decisions contained in the accompanying papers.  There are 13 accompanying papers as listed below:

·           Deliberations Cover Report

·           Strategic Framework Overview

·           Financial Overview (including Financial Strategy and Port of Tauranga Ltd divestment)

·           Revenue and Financing Policy

·           Community Outcome Papers (five) where required

A healthy environment – Regional Parks, Wairoa River Strategy and Whakatane Harbour Bar Calling

Future Ready Communities – Rivers and Drainage

Connected Communities - Public Transport

Sustainable Development – Waste Management

The Pursuit of Excellence (Te Ara Poutama) – Te Amorangi (Maori Strategy) and Te Pae Tawhiti (Maori capability and capacity building)

·           Community Funding

·           Fees and Charges Policy

·           Rates Remission and Postponement Policies

·           Development Contributions and Financial Contributions Policy

Based on the decisions made at these deliberations, the draft Long Term Plan 2024-2034 will be compiled and subject to the statutory audit process.  Council is scheduled to meet on 26 June to adopt the final audited Long Term Plan 2024-2034 and associated policies.

 

 

Recommendations

That the Regional Council:

1        Receives the report, Deliberations Report - Overview of Long Term Plan Process.

 

1.        Introduction

The process for the draft Long Term Plan 2024-2034 (LTP) has been underway since December 2022.  The adoption of the Consultation Document and supporting documentation for consultation on 6 March 2024 was a significant milestone in the LTP process.  Consultation occurred from 8 March 2024 to 9 April 2024.

Council received a total of 464 submissions of which 391 were received for the LTP. Details of submissions received for the other policy documents are as follows:

Policy

Submissions received

Revenue and Financing Policy

1

Rates Remission and Postponement Policies

50

Fees and Charges

21

Development Contributions or Financial Contributions Policy

1

Subtotal

73

LTP

391

Total submissions

464

Attachment 1 contains an analysis of the demographics of people that made LTP submissions.

Councillors are now requested to make final decisions on levels of service, projects and budgets for the LTP. 

The draft LTP for consultation was prepared based on the need for prudence in a challenging financial environment and changing government policy.  Council has been clear in the challenge of keeping rates increases affordable, doing more with less and seeking out efficiencies where possible.  The development of the activity plans and financial information has been based on this direction.

Decisions will be required in response to the LTP consultation and feedback through submissions and changes in the external environment.  Separate papers have been prepared to provide the necessary information for Councillors to make decisions. 

These include:

·      A financial overview paper

·      A paper for each community outcome where decisions are required

·      A community funding paper

·      Separate papers for LTP associated policies under review.

The decisions made at these deliberations will provide staff with the necessary direction to finalise the LTP for adoption by Council on 26 June 2024.

1.1      Legislative Framework

Council is required to have a Long Term Plan under section 93 of the Local Government Act 2002.

1.2      Alignment with Strategic Framework

 

A Healthy Environment

Freshwater for Life

Safe and Resilient Communities

A Vibrant Region

The Way We Work

We deliver value to our ratepayers and our customers.

This paper indirectly contributes to all community outcomes as it is part of the LTP process.

Noting that these outcomes have been updated in the draft strategic framework.  In the assessment of the issues and options the draft strategic framework has been applied.

1.2.1    Community Well-beings Assessment

Dominant Well-Beings Affected

þ Environmental

Low - Positive

þ Cultural

Low - Positive

þ Social

Low - Positive

þ Economic

Low - Positive

 

2.        Long Term Plan Process

2.1      March – August 2023 Workshops

During a series of meetings and workshops Councillors revised the strategic direction to guide the development of the LTP.  The strategic framework was endorsed by Council at the May 2023 workshop.  The activity structure was reviewed and aligned with the new framework.

Council was informed of the process for the review of the Financial Strategy and Policies, and the Rates Remission and Postponement Policy and direction sought from Council.

Financial discussions centred around the budget process and the funding levers available to Council.  Council provided clear direction that this LTP must respond to the current economic climate and proposed rates increases are affordable.  In response LTP workshops were held for Council to consider savings scenarios across all organisation activities.

2.2      September 2023 Workshops

There were a total of five workshops held in September.  Two of these workshops focused on the clear direction provided by Council regarding affordability and the potential recession.  As a result:

·      Financials – baseline financial information was provided alongside the financial assumptions to be applied. 

·      Efficiencies and savings – all activities were reviewed based on three agreed scenarios and savings options identified.  Council agreed the level of service adjustment for each activity, to be built into the LTP. 

Work continued in the development of the Revenue and Financing Policy and the Rates Remission Policy, where Council provided further guidance.

The proposal to enable divestment of the council’s shares in the Port of Tauranga Ltd was considered at two publicly excluded workshops. 

On-line pre-engagement occurred through two pulse style online surveys.  One survey focused on the priorities for the region and the other asked activity specific questions.  Further details are provided in section 3 below.

2.3      October 2023 Workshops and Pre-engagement

Two workshops were held.  The review of activities and levels of service continued, and an updated budget version 2 was provided.  The funding assessments completed as part of the Revenue and Financing Policy were presented and direction was provided by Council.  The Rates Remission Policy review continued where Council considered potential new remission categories and provided direction on these.

A further workshop was held on 25 October to further consider the proposal to enable the Port of Tauranga Ltd share divestment.

2.4      November 2023

Four workshops were held in November.  This was a critical month where final direction was received from Council on key LTP inputs as the draft Consultation document was scheduled for adoption for audit on 6 December 2023.  This entailed:

·      Final review of key activities i.e. regional development, spatial planning, and transportation

·      Infrastructure Strategy and Asset Management Plans

·      Draft Activity Plans

·      Draft policies including, Rates Remission and Postponement Policies, Fees and Charges

·      Final decisions for consultation on the proposal to enable the Port of Tauranga Ltd divestment.

2.5      December 2023 Meeting

Adoption of the Draft LTP Consultation Document and supporting material for audit.

2.6      March 2024

Adoption of the Consultation Document and supporting documentation for the draft LTP and Statements of Proposal for associated policy reviews.  The Audit Opinion on these documents was received.

Consultation was held from 8 March to 9 April 2024.

2.7      May 2024

Hearings for the submissions received on the Consultation Document for the draft LTP and associated policy reviews.  Council heard from 185 submitters over four days. 

3.        Communications and Engagement

Communications and engagement activities leading up to and during the LTP consultation period aimed to raise awareness about the LTP process and encourage submissions. For the consultation and the supporting communications campaign, we offered different ways to connect with the community and tried to reach the community in places and ways that would work for them.

3.1      Pre-Engagement

In September and October 2023 we ran two pulse-style online surveys as pre-engagement. These surveys were promoted widely by sending an email to the Participate database, running a paid digital advertising campaign, sharing organic social media content and promoting Council newsletters including the Around Our Rohe print ads. Pre-engagement results and insights were shared with Council on 26 October.

The first survey ran from 14-28 September and focused on priorities for the region. This survey received 383 contributions from 363 contributors. The second survey ran from 5-12 October and focused on activity-specific questions.  This survey received 1,326 contributions from 1,277 contributors.

3.2      Consultation Communications and Engagement Activities (March – April 2024)

              Communications

·           Shared two media releases to promote the start of the consultation period.

·           Sent direct emails to the Participate subscriber database about the LTP and the Community Initiatives Fund.

·           Developed a support pack for councillors that included key messages, supporting information and a presentation.

·           Shared a series of organic social media posts and videos.

·           Printed 700 copies of the consultation document and the submission form that were shared at events and distributed across the region through existing council networks such as libraries.

·           Designed branded collateral to support engagement activity. This included interactive activities, posters and handout material with a QR code linking to the Participate web page as give-aways.

·           Developed the LTP Participate web pages which included a “How to participate” video to show site visitors how to make a submission. The Participate page was viewed 11,581 times by 6,207 unique visitors and 296 online submissions were completed during the consultation period.

·           Shared an online rates calculation tool.

·           Ran a comprehensive multi-channel advertising campaign:

a.       Social media advertising

b.       Digital advertising – programmatic video, Spotify, mobile proximity advertising and direct display online advertising.

c.       Print advertising in newspapers across the region.

d.       Radio advertising.

              Community Engagement

·              Hosted five community pop-ups during consultation where we interacted with 848 members of the public asking them to prioritise the functions of Regional Council based on “What matters most”. This activity highlighted Environmental Protection (18.9%), Partnerships with Māori (16.6%) and Public Transport (14.1%) as the top three functions. The community pop-ups included:

a.       Bayfair Shopping Centre, Mount Maunganui

b.      Rangitāiki River Festival, Thornton

c.       Kuirau Park Markets, Rotorua

d.      Tauranga Multicultural Festival, Tauranga

e.       Business at Breakfast event, Tauranga

 

·              Held 22 one-on-one hui with Post Governance Settlement entities, iwi, hapū and Māori land trusts.

·              Met with all six Bay of Plenty territorial local authority Councils.

·              Presentation to five Co-governance forums and two tangata whenua forums.

·              Three online hui for tangata whenua in the Mauao, Kōhī and Ōkurei constituencies.

·              Ran a series of twice-weekly Councillor drop-in sessions from 26 February to allow community members to discuss their issues directly with an elected member.

·              Offered an independent friend of the submitter service to support first-time and less experienced submitters through the process. This directly supported 17 submissions plus provided guidance to four other organisations or members of the public.

 

The extensive engagement with Māori for the LTP was reported to Komiti Māori on 30 April.

The LTP was promoted at additional events including:

·              Presentations to River Advisory Groups

·              Pacific Growth Careers Expo

·              Councillor led community presentations including the Tauranga Citizen’s Club.

Communications and engagement activity highlights and insights will be shared in a supplementary presentation.

4.        Recommended Decision Making Approach

There are a large number of decisions requiring resolution in the associated papers.  As some decisions link with others, and because of the potential cumulative financial impact of decisions on the overall plan, it is recommended that Council make decisions in a two step process:

1.    First, ‘in principle’ decisions are made on the Key Decisions as each paper is considered

2.    Second, Council reviews the full set of ‘in principle’ decisions at the end of the meeting and confirms or amends these.

5.        Summary of Papers

5.1      Strategic Framework Overview

The impact of submissions on the draft strategic direction and prioritised goals.

5.2      Financial Overview

This paper provides:

·       An outline of the overall financial position including changes to rates and prudence/ratios.  Details of reserve balances and borrowing forecasts.

·       The Draft Financial Strategy

·       An issues and options paper for the proposal to enable the divestment of Port of Tauranga Ltd shares

5.3      Revenue and Financing Policy

This paper provides:

·      Statistical summary of the Participate survey responses and key themes of narrative responses

·      One Issues and Options paper covering the funding of Urban Public Transport, with a recommendation to confirm the proposal

·      Recommendations to confirm the proposals for Rotorua Catchments and Rotorua Air

5.4      Community Outcome Papers

In response to submissions received Community Outcome papers have been prepared.  These provide details for activities where the submissions have identified the potential need for a council response. Papers are:

·       A healthy environment – Regional Parks, Wairoa River Strategy and Whakatane Harbour Bar Calling

·       Future Ready Communities – Rivers and Drainage

·       Connected Communities - Public Transport

·       The Pursuit of Excellence (Te Ara Poutama) – Te Amorangi (Maori Strategy) and Te Pae Tawhiti (Maori capability and capacity building)

5.5      Community Funding

Council received a total of 40 requests for operational funding.  The total value is $15.6m over three years. 

Direction will be sought on the allocation of funding for:

·       Community Initiative Fund Applications

·       Regional Safety and Rescue Services

·       Volunteer Capability and Capacity building

`             There are a further 10 requests for capital funding.  A number are for sewerage reticulation.  Not all requests for capital funding specified an amount.  Two did, and that was for $16.4m in year one of the LTP.

5.6      Fees and Charges Policy

This paper highlights the submissions received and related issues and option papers.  Key topics are:

·    Gravel management – increase or status quo

·    Mooring fees – full increase vs stage increase

5.7      Rates Remission and Postponement Policies

This paper includes the statistical summary of Participate responses for Maori Freehold Land and All Land policies.  There are four issues and options papers for consideration.

5.8      Development Contributions and Financial Contributions Policy

This paper will confirm proposed policy as approved for consultation.

6.        Considerations

6.1      Risks and Mitigations

Significant reliance is placed on the key decisions being made at deliberations to enable required updates to the LTP budget and documentation in readiness for Audit at the beginning of June.  An audit opinion will be issued at the LTP adoption meeting on 26 June 2024.

6.2      Climate Change

Individual papers considered implications for climate change in relation to specific decisions.

 

6.3      Implications for Māori

Individual papers considered implications for climate change in relation to specific decisions.

 

6.4      Community Engagement

 

Adobe Systems

CONSULT

Whakauiuia

To obtain input or feedback from affected communities about our analysis, alternatives, and /or proposed decisions.

The information presented in the accompanying papers summarises and analyses the 391 LTP submissions were received during the Special Consultative Procedure.

 

6.5      Financial Implications

Detailed financial information is provided in the accompanying Financial Overview paper.

 

7.        Next Steps

At the conclusion of deliberations, staff will update the text and financial information in the draft LTP.  The draft LTP will then be subject to a final audit with Audit New Zealand prior to being presented to Council for adoption on 26 June 2024.

The LTP will comprise of two volumes:

1.   Volume One/Tahi: Strategic context, levels of service/performance goals, and financial impacts

 

2.   Volume Two/Rua: financial and Infrastructure Strategies, key policies and detailed financial statements.

 

Attachments

Attachment 1 - Demographic analysis - LTP 2024 submitters  

 


Regional Council                                                                                                          28 May 2024

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Report To:

Regional Council

Meeting Date:

28 May 2024

Report Writer:

Olive McVicker, Corporate Performance Team Lead; Kumaren Perumal, Chief Financial Officer; Gillian Payne, Principal Advisor and Graeme Howard, Corporate Planning Lead

Report Authoriser:

Mat Taylor, General Manager, Corporate

Purpose:

To provide Councillors the strategic context of the Long Term Plan 2024-2034 and to note key events that have taken place since the consultation document was adopted.

 

 

Deliberations Report - Strategic Framework Overview

 

Executive Summary

Council reviewed the strategic framework in 2023 and identified five community outcomes and 17 goals supporting those outcomes.  This draft strategic framework was adopted by Council in March 2024 as part of the Consultation Document for the draft Long Term Plan 2024-2034 (LTP). Submitters were invited to provide feedback on the strategic framework. 

The consultation period commenced on 8 March 2024 and finished on 9 April 2024.  At the end of the submission period 22 submitters provided feedback.  Overall feedback received was positive i.e. strong support for Te Ara Poutama, and support for the overall framework while others advocated for the framework to be used in Council decision making.

The adoption of the LTP will enable the full implementation of the strategic framework including alignment of business templates and Council reporting templates, as well as considering measurement options to monitor achievement.

This report also provides an update on key changes in our external environment since the adoption of the LTP Consultation Document.

 

Recommendations

That the Regional Council:

1        Receives the report, Deliberations Report - Strategic Framework Overview;

2        That Council endorses the strategic framework to guide council decision-making over the first three years of the 2024-2034 Long Term Plan once adopted;

3        That Council refers the draft Bay of Plenty Regional Council prioritisation matrix to the Strategy and Policy Committee to develop and finalise.

 

1.        Introduction

Council reviewed and updated the strategic direction in 2023.  The new framework was endorsed by Council in May 2023 and this provided the platform on which to build the draft Long Term Plan 2024-2034 (LTP).

The strategic framework provides the foundation for the LTP.  It identifies the community outcomes which are a requirement of the Local Government Act 2002 (LGA), and reflect the four wellbeings (environmental, social, cultural, and economic).  The goals recognise Council’s specific focus in delivering the outcomes.  This is underpinned by the organisation’s values, enablers and how we work.

To guide the prioritisation of the goals, a time horizons model has been developed alongside the prioritisation principles (Attachment 2 and 3). The LTP covers a period of 10 years, which has resulted in three time horizons being identified. The time horizons acknowledge that the relative priorities of some goals will change over time. 

During development of the LTP, Council activities were reviewed and aligned with the new strategic framework and new activities established i.e. climate change and freshwater.  The financial information and activity planning was aligned to this new structure.

As part of the activity planning and review of the Revenue and Financing Policy, the activities were aligned to the outcomes and goals.  The activity plans also considered the three time horizons and the goal prioritisation to plan their work programmes.

1.1      Legislative Framework

Council is required to have a Long Term Plan under section 93 of the Local Government Act 2002 (LGA), which includes the identification of community outcomes.  Schedule 10 of LGA also requires Council to identify Groups of Activities, and Activities.

1.2      Alignment with Strategic Framework

 

A Healthy Environment

 

Freshwater for Life

 

Safe and Resilient Communities

 

A Vibrant Region

 

The Way We Work

We deliver value to our ratepayers and our customers.

 

Council has reviewed and proposed a new strategic framework/direction including new community outcomes for the LTP. If Council adopts the new strategic direction, this will replace the current Community Outcomes from 1 July 2024.

 

1.2.1    Community Well-beings Assessment

Dominant Well-Beings Affected

þ Environmental

Low - Positive

þ Cultural

Low - Positive

þ Social

Low - Positive

þ Economic

Low - Positive

 

 

2.        Strategic Framework for LTP 2024-2034

2.1      Proposed Strategic Framework

The proposed strategic framework was developed by Council in 2023, consisting of community outcomes, goals, and enablers together with Council’s vision, mission and values and a statement of how we work. 

This framework was published in the Consultation Document and submitters were invited to provide feedback.  The full strategic framework is contained in Attachment 1 and the three time horizons (Attachment 2) and Prioritisation Principles in Attachment 3.

Council adopted the Consultation Document on 6 March 2024 and consultation commenced on 8 March 2024.  In the consultation document the public were asked to include in their submission what they thought of the new strategic direction.  The consultation period closed on 9 April.  

2.2      Feedback received on the Strategic Framework

Of the submissions received, 22 endorsed the community outcomes with 50% of those specifically endorsing Te Ara Poutama/The Pursuit of Excellence.  Two of these submitters requested that Council consider the elevation of Te Ara Poutama as an overarching outcome as a way of signifying the importance of this outcome.  It was also noted that the focus on Māori participation should not be limited to only some of the community outcomes but is fully integrated into the design, development, and execution of all the other community outcomes.

The remaining 50% of the submissions was made up of:

·      five submitters (23%) who provided overall support for the new strategic framework

·      three submitters (13.5%) who aligned Council’s strategic framework to the activities of their organisation

·      three submissions (13.5%) that identified the need to clearly align our decision-making processes with the strategic framework in all aspects of our business, including investment decisions

There was no specific mention of the prioritisation principles identified in the consultation document.  However, one submitter did highlight the need to consider the equity context when deliberating and making final decisions. 

Two submitters in their endorsement identified the need to measure and track progress towards achieving the goals identified.

2.3      Council response to submissions on strategic framework

There are no specific changes required to the strategic framework as a result of the submissions received.  However, there are opportunities to enhance the implementation of the framework.  This includes:

a.    the development of a performance framework to monitor Council’s achievement against the goals

b.    reinforcing the application of the framework in decision making by updating business templates, including all Council report templates once the strategic framework is formally adopted

c.    the implementation of the Te Ara Poutama outcome and resourcing implications. 

These opportunities will be developed as part of the implementation of the LTP.

2.4      Application of the strategic framework and prioritisation principles in LTP deliberations

To identify the decisions required in the deliberations process, staff have completed Issues and Option papers (IOP).  The IOP have been developed to align activities to the strategic framework.  The IOP template requires staff to identify community outcomes and goals that the activity is aligned with. Links to the Prioritisation Principles would be noted in the options analysis narrative and tables in the IOP.

In addition to these issues and options papers, staff have also considered the following draft BOPRC prioritisation matrix when providing staff recommendations on responses to submissions.  The following prioritisation concept is designed to enable holistic decision-making.  This is a points-based system to ensure a comprehensive evaluation of projects, considering not only their financial implications but also broader impacts on the environment, community, and compliance with regulations.

The points available to each category reflect the priority principles, with more points available to areas of highest priority.


 

 

Project/Initiative

Maximum Points Available

Legislative / Regulatory Compliance

50

Impact Statements

Climate change

Partnerships with Māori

Community Participation

20

Community Outcomes

Healthy Environment

Future Ready Communities

Connected Communities

Sustainable Development

Pursuit of Excellence

15

Fiscal Responsibility

Cost effectiveness

Efficiency

10

Organisational culture impact

5

Total points available

100

Scoring

The number of points scored in a category will depend on the impact of the project or initiative, split between:

·      High (H): Major positive impact, strong community alignment, high cost-effectiveness and efficiency, high organisation culture alignment

·      Medium (M): Moderate impact, good community alignment, moderate cost-effectiveness and efficiency, good organisation culture alignment.

·      Low (L): Minimal impact, weak community alignment, low cost-effectiveness and efficiency, poor organisation culture alignment.

It is proposed that this draft prioritisation matrix be further considered by the Strategy and Policy Committee for future decision-making.

 

3.        Key events since adoption of the Consultation Document

Since the Consultation Document was adopted for consultation in March 2024 the following key events have occurred.

i.          Government Policy Statement for Public Transport and removal of the child fare free subsidy and half price subsidy for those aged 13-24 from 1 May 2024.

ii.         Resource Management Act Amendment Bill #1 – to focus on targeted changes that can take effect quickly while the legislation to replace the RMA is developed.  Includes reducing regulatory burden on resource consent applicants and supporting development in key sectors.

iii.        Resource Management Act Amendment Bill #2 – to enable housing growth, speed up consenting timeframes for renewable energy and wood processing, support the Governments ‘Infrastructure for the Future’ plan and introduce emergency response regulations.

iv.        The donation of the Western Bay Regional Park – the community was asked if Council should investigate options for more regional parks.  The donation of this property has pre-empted the results of the consultation question, but they remain relevant for future decisions on other opportunities.

v.         The rate of inflation decreased from 4.7% at the end of 2023 to 4% in the first quarter of 2024.

vi.        Unemployment increased to 4.3% in the March 2024 quarter.

vii.       The Official Cash Rate (OCR) remained at 5.5%

viii.      2023 Census results will start to be released from 29 May 2024.

A full analysis of any implications of these events will be considered in the relevant activity and IOP.

 

4.        Considerations

4.1      Risks and Mitigations

There are no significant risks associated with decisions relating to this paper.

 

4.2      Climate Change

The matters addressed in this report are of a procedural nature and there is no need to consider climate change impacts.

 

4.3      Implications for Māori

Consultation on the LTP, Rates Remissions Policies and other associated policies has been supported by the communications and engagement programme. This has included a focus on seeking input from Māori across our region and has resulted in a number of submissions from Māori individuals, iwi and organisations.

 

4.4      Community Engagement

 

Adobe Systems

CONSULT

Whakauiuia

To obtain input or feedback from affected communities about our analysis, alternatives, and /or proposed decisions.

 

The information presented in the papers for this meeting summarise and analyse the 391 LTP submissions received during the Special Consultative Procedure.

 

4.5      Financial Implications

If the recommendation is adopted by Council, will it result in:

-   Unbudgeted work during the current financial year?

-   Unbudgeted work for any of the years remaining in the current Long Term Plan?

If the answer is ‘no’ to both questions please select the dropdown option 1 and complete appropriately.

If the answer is ‘yes’ to either question please select “Budget Implications” in the building block below and liaise with your Management Accountant in order to complete the Financial Impact table.

 

Details on the financial information is presented in the accompanying Financial Overview report. 

 

5.        Next Steps

Next Steps: What next? What resources are needed? Further analysis? Timeframes ahead. Any consultation planned. Remind Council of the process ahead. Next update to Council?

Conclusion: Short concluding remarks. Referring back to recommendations. No new content.

At the conclusion of the deliberations staff will update the financial and non-financial information in the LTP.  The LTP will then be subject to a final audit by Audit New Zealand prior to being presented for Council adoption on 26 June 2024.

The LTP will comprise two volumes:

·    Volume One/Tahi: Strategic context, levels of service/performance goals, and financial impacts

·    Volume Two/Rua: Financial and infrastructure strategies, key policies, and detailed financial arrangements.

Attachments

Attachment 1 - Strategic Direction Doc 2023_24 Poster A3_NOV

Attachment 2 - Summary of Time Horizon and the Prioritisation of Goals diagram (002)

Attachment 3 - Prioritisation Principles  

 


Regional Council                                                                                                                           28 May 2024

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Regional Council                                                                                                                           28 May 2024

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Regional Council                                                                                                          28 May 2024

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Report To:

Regional Council

Meeting Date:

28 May 2024

Report Writer:

Mark Le Comte, Principal Advisor, Finance; AJ Prinsloo, Finance Manager and Kumaren Perumal, Chief Financial Officer

Report Authoriser:

Mat Taylor, General Manager, Corporate

Purpose:

To outline the overall financial situation as context for the draft Long Term Plan 2024-2034 decision making.
To deliberate on the proposed managed sell-down of Port of Tauranga shares.

 

 

Financial Overview, Financial Strategy and Proposal for Managed Sell Down of Port of Tauranga Limited Shares

 

Executive Summary

This report provides an update of the draft Long Term Plan 2024-2034 (LTP) budget and provides information on the context within which Council is making its financial decisions.

There have been several changes to forecast operating and capital expenditure estimates since adoption of the Consultation Document (CD) in March 2024. These changes resulted from new information, internal reviews and the impact of updated financial forecasts for 2023/24. The overall impacts are:

·      Operating expenditure reduces by $1.8m million in year one and $4 million in total over the first three years of the LTP. These changes are discussed in section 2.1.

·      The Equalisation Reserve has a forecast opening balance of $2.2 million.

·      General rates increases for the first three years have reduced from 9.9% (4.1% real) in the CD to 8.2% (2.9% real). This is before using the Equalisation Reserve, or new initiatives that requires additional funding, arising from submissions.

The financial implications of the various staff deliberations recommendations and the consequential budget amendments are discussed in each of the deliberations reports in this agenda and summarised in section 3 of this report.

Council received 260 submission responses to the question relating to the proposed managed sell-down of the Port of Tauranga shares. Submission responses to the question were evenly split for and against the proposal. 

Submitters, including iwi and mana/tangata whenua, have raised a range of considerations for any sell-down process. Following decisions made at Deliberations, and subsequently through adoption of the LTP, these, and other considerations, may need to be incorporated in the design of any sell-down process.

 

Recommendations

That the Regional Council:

1        Receives the report, Financial Overview, Financial Strategy and Proposal for Managed Sell Down of Port of Tauranga Limited Shares;

2        Following consideration of deliberations issues and options papers, directs staff on the approach to rates smoothing and any reserve use;

3        Directs that, as set out in the preferred option in the Consultation Document, the LTP is prepared to enable the managed sell-down of the Port of Tauranga Limited shares to a minimum of shareholding of 28%;

4        Agrees that, subject to approval of recommendation 3 above, that a budget of $300,000 (for specialist advice to Council) so that Council can appropriately direct Quayside Holdings Limited in designing the managed sell-down process including consideration of submissions that raise issues related to the potential sale process, or conditions of the potential sale;

5        Agrees that, subject to approval of recommendation 3 above, if necessary Quayside Holdings Limited will be directed, by resolution, to modify its Statement of Intent for 2024/25 to state that the sale of any Port of Tauranga Shares is conditional on Council approving the managed sale process, and on Council agreeing that all parameters set in the sale process have been met;

6        Approves that the draft Long Term Plan 2024-2034 be prepared on the basis of the General Rates smoothing set out in Table 5, with an increase in General Rates revenue of 8.2% (2.9% real) in 2024/25;

7        Approves that any end of year Equalisation Reserve balance, currently projected to be $2.2 million, is transferred to the Regional Fund as part of the process to complete the Annual Report 2023/24;

8        Delegates to the Chief Executive to incorporate relevant updates from the Government Budget announcements into the draft Long Term Plan 2024-2034 being prepared for adoption, in consultation with the Regional Council Chair;

9        Approves that, given the overall financial position of the Regional Council as set out in the Draft Long Term Plan 2024 – 2034, no further funding requests are approved through the Deliberations on the Long Term Plan except where funding is approved to be met from the efficiencies and savings generated and transferred to the Regional Fund at the end of the financial year.

 

1.        Introduction

Council’s development of a sustainable and prudent budget for the Long Term Plan 2024 - 2034 has followed an extensive process. This included a review of the Council’s shareholding in the Port of Tauranga Limited which is managed by Quayside Holdings Limited (QHL). This complex financial analysis and discussion, with independent advice, established the options for consultation on a managed sell-down.

At its meeting on 6 March 2024, Council adopted the Consultation Document (CD) ‘Your Bay Your Say and supporting documents, including the draft Revenue and Financing Policy for public consultation. The underlying information to the CD included financial forecasts for operating expenditure, capital expenditure, revenue, and treasury for the next ten years.

Some amendments have been made to the LTP financial estimates to reflect the latest economic forecasts and cost savings made by the Chief Executive through the efficient management of organisation expenditure.

There are several deliberation issues set out in the Council agenda which will have a consequential financial impact depending on Council’s decisions through this meeting. These implications may affect operating expenditure and revenue, capital expenditure, borrowings, and the use of reserves.

The financial implications of the various staff deliberations recommendations and the consequent budget amendments are discussed in each of the individual deliberations reports in this agenda and summarised in section 3 of this report.

1.1      Legislative Framework

Council is required to have a Long Term Plan under the Local Government Act 2002 (LGA) s93, and reports from this meeting recommend various budget changes, in response to the feedback received through the Special Consultative Procedure that has been undertaken under the LGA S83, and new information.

In addition, the LGA s100 sets the requirement to have a balanced budget unless it is prudent to do otherwise and LGA s101-s111 outlines the various financial strategies and policies that are required as part of prudent financial management.

1.2      Alignment with Strategic Framework

 

A Healthy Environment

 

Freshwater for Life

 

Safe and Resilient Communities

 

A Vibrant Region

 

The Way We Work

 

This report covers financial matters and indirectly supports the community outcomes.

1.2.1    Community Well-beings Assessment

Dominant Well-Beings Affected

¨ Environmental

 

¨ Cultural

 

¨ Social

 

¨ Economic

 

 

This report covers financial matters and indirectly supports community well-being.

2.        Financial Overview

The focus of Council’s LTP is to deliver Community Outcomes and the approved Goals and improve the wellbeing of our communities. Ultimately, Council expenditure investment is targeted towards this.

Activity planning through the LTP process included a detailed review of discretionary/non-discretionary work, and the potential savings and efficiencies that could be made. Over $10 million of savings and efficiencies, recommended by the Chief Executive, have been incorporated into the draft LTP budget, and has helped to produce an Equalisation Reserve balance of $2.2m projected at the end of this financial year. 

As part of the review of the draft LTP budget, and in preparation for deliberations, a number of amendments and changes are required to the ten year forecasts which underpinned the CD adopted in March 2024. The changes to forecast operating and capital expenditure have resulted from new information, internal reviews and the impact of updated financial forecasts for 2023/24.

The Consumer Price Index (CPI) assumptions for the LTP 2024 – 2034 are lower than previously forecasted. The draft budget has been updated to reduce financial estimates that are affected by CPI. BERL Local Government Cost Indices are unchanged in Council’s significant forecasting assumptions.

2.1      Operating Expenditure

The updated draft operating expenditure forecast is shown in Table 1. Overall, operating expenditure has been reduced by $1.9 million in year one and $4 million in total over years 1-3.


 

 

Table 1 – Draft LTP 2024-2034 Forecast Operating Expenditure

 

2024/25

2025/26

2026/27

2027-2034

 

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Years 4-10

 

$ 000

$ 000

$ 000

$ 000

Total Operating Expenditure LTP Consultation

200,731

202,482

203,224

1,594,860

Net increase (decrease) since consultation

(1,882)

(857)

(1,249)

1,058

Total Operating Expenditure current draft LTP

198,849

201,625

201,975

1,595,918

A summary of the changes to operating expenditure for year one (compared to the budgets that underpinned the CD) is shown in Table 2 below. A significant part of the overall saving has been through active prioritisation of resourcing and re-allocation of work for efficiency. Also, extra interest revenue of $330,000 has been budgeted based on reduced forecast capital expenditure in 2023/24.

Table 2 – Draft LTP 2024-2034 Forecast Operating Changes

Item

LTP Year 1 Operating Expenditure Changes

Comments

$000

Total Operating Expenditure - LTP Consultation

200,731

 

Re-prioritisation of resourcing

(1,106)

 

Fresh Water Programme

(950)

Fresh Water budget reductions and partial reallocation to Geothermal activity

Geothermal

100

Changes to depreciation

(375)

Changes to asset revaluations and reclassification of expenditure

Alignment to Asset Management Plans

(276)

Reduced work in the Rivers and Drainage activity to align with AMP

Reduced inflation and other changes

(165)

 

ICT reclassification of capex to opex

890

 Refer paragraph 2.4

Total changes made

(1,882)

 

Total Operating Expenditure - current draft LTP

198,849

 

 

2.2      Equalisation Reserve

As a result of savings made in expenditure in 2023/24, the Equalisation Reserve has a forecast opening balance of $2.2 million. This reserve balance is as yet uncommitted, and is available to Council, for example, to reduce rates increases. It is recommended that this balance is transferred at the end of the financial year when the precise amount is known and would be available as Regional Fund Reserve funding.

2.3      Rates

Tables 3 and 4 show the changes in general and targeted rates as a result of the budget changes. These are before any smoothing, reserve use that hasn’t already been signalled, or impact of deliberations decisions being applied.

Table 3 – Draft LTP 2024-2034 General Rates pre-smoothing

 

2024/25

2025/26

2026/27

 

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

 

$000

$000

$000

General Rates LTP Consultation

45,839

50,195

54,976

Net increase (decrease) since consultation

(2,198)

594

(2,937)

General Rates current draft LTP

43,641

50,789

52,040

Table 4 – Draft LTP 2024-2034 Targeted Rates

 

2024/25

2025/26

2026/27

 

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

 

$000

$000

$000

Targeted rates LTP Consultation

45,563

48,855

48,137

Net increase since consultation

601

409

427

Targeted Rates current draft LTP

46,163

49,264

48,564

The increases in targeted rates since consultation are due to:

·      a correction in funding for Regional Safety and Rescue Services from General Rates to Targeted Rates; and

·      increased depreciation for the Kaituna River and drainage scheme as a result of adjustments made through the asset revaluations process.

2.3.1    General Rates Smoothing

As part of the draft LTP for consultation, Council chose to smooth the increase in general rates, resulting in increases of 9.9% (4.1% real) for each of the first three years. Applying similar smoothing tools, the general rates increase would 8.2% (2.9% real) for each of the first three years, then forecast at 3.3% (0% real) thereafter. The general rates percentage increases, before and after smoothing are shown in the Table 5.

This is before consideration of other financial decisions at deliberations and does not include any use of the forecast opening $2.2 million balance of the Equalisation Reserve as mentioned.

Table 5 – Draft LTP 2024-2034 General Rates Increases

 

2024/25

2025/26

2026/27

 

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

 

$000

$000

$000

General Rates increases before smoothing

4.4%

17.0%

2.5%

General Rates increases smoothed

8.2%

8.2%

8.2%

The large increase in general rates in the ‘un-smoothed increase’ for year 2 is primarily due to Revenue and Financing Policy changes, as set out in the report elsewhere on the agenda and Governance costs related to Local Body elections and the establishment of the new Council Triennium.

Total Rates increase was 13% in the draft LTP for consultation. Using the smoothed general rates figures, the total rates increase remains at 13% in year one, then 7.4% and 3.3% for the following years.

Government Budget announcements could impact general and targeted rates in the Long Term Plan, particularly if new government funding is announced for the “Before the Deluge 2.0” business case to support river schemes. Any Budget announcements will be updated for financial information (including rates increases) for the final draft LTP to be proposed for adoption by Council in June 2024. Due to the timing of any announcement, it is recommended that Council delegates to the Chief Executive the ability to incorporate changes.

2.3.2    Rates Across the Region

Attachment 1 shows the stacked bar graph of the median rates across for each district across the region, using the smoothed general rates figures.

2.4      Capital Expenditure

The Capital Expenditure forecast has not changed materially from the Consultation Document draft budget. Except that existing ICT capital expenditure has been reclassified as operating expenditure to comply with the Accounting Standards. This results in a reduction of $13 million capital expenditure over 10 years. This reclassification reduces the need for use of asset replacement reserves to fund capital but increases the immediate rates impact to fund operating costs. The 10 year forecast is shown in table 6.

Table 6 – Draft LTP 2024-2034 Capital Expenditure

 

2024/25

2025/26

2026/27

2027-2034

 

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Years 4-10

 

$000

$000

$000

$000

Capital Expenditure LTP Consultation

         29,460

      29,031

      27,723

      75,421

Net increase (decrease) since Consultation

(3,631)

826

(1,009)

(8,874)

Capital Expenditure current draft LTP

         25,830

      29,856

      26,714

      66,548

2.5      Regional Fund Reserve

The Regional Fund Reserve forecast has a higher opening balance as a result of updates to 2023/24 forecasts, however, the long-term balances have not changed materially. The Regional Fund reserve is currently budgeted to include funding of the grant to the Rotorua Museum in year 3. A decision to use the Regional Fund to fund other projects would forgo interest revenue as a result.

The projected 2023/24 end of year balance of the Equalisation Reserve ($2.2m) is recommended to be transferred to the Regional Fund Reserve and is a source of funding for other Deliberations reports elsewhere on this agenda. This proposed transfer has not been included in the forecast below.


 

Table 7 - Draft LTP 2024-2034 Regional Fund Reserve Forecast

(Excluding Equalisation Reserve end of year transfer)

 

 

2024/25

2025/26

2026/27

 

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

 

000

000

000

Regional Fund LTP Consultation

           3,229

         7,945

      11,522

Net increase (decrease) since consultation

2,712

2,395

(26)

Regional Fund current draft LTP

           5,942

      10,340

      11,496

2.6      Borrowing

The borrowing forecast has reduced over the 10 year period as a result of reduced capital expenditure. The 10 year forecast for Council borrowing (excluding Quayside) is shown below.

Table 8 – Draft LTP 2024-2034 Council Core Borrowing Forecast

 

2024/25

2025/26

2026/27

2027/28

2028/29

2029/30

2030/31

2031/32

2032/33

2033/34

 

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

Year 6

Year 7

Year 8

Year 9

Year 10

 

$m

$m

$m

$m

$m

$m

$m

$m

$m

$m

Council Core Borrowing LTP Consultation

154

173

190

190

190

188

187

185

184

182

Net increase (decrease) since consultation

2

-1

-1

-4

-4

-6

-6

-7

-8

-9

Council Core Borrowing current draft LTP

156

172

189

186

185

183

180

178

176

173

 

3.        Deliberations Decisions

The financial implications from the various staff deliberations recommendations and consequential budget amendments are discussed in each of the individual deliberation’s reports. Attachment 2 shows a list of the financial implications of the preferred options for all issues and options papers.

4.        Consultation Topic - Proposal for Managed Sell Down of Port of Tauranga Shares

The CD included the Proposal for Managed Sell Down of Port of Tauranga Shares as one of the three key consultation topics. In the CD, the Council’s preferred option was a managed sell down to a minimum of 28% shareholding in Port of Tauranga Limited (PoTL). The key advantages for this were described in the Consultation Document as:

·      Increase portfolio diversification, including reduced exposure to port-specific risks. PoTL could then make up 30% of QHL’s total assets by 2036 with 70% in diversified assets reducing risk to future dividends.

·      More liquidity of investments, meaning there is potential for higher dividends in the future.

·      Ability to repay the Perpetual Preference Shares (PPS) and generate more cashflow from the PPS dividend savings.

In adopting the Consultation Document, Council considered:

·      The implications of partial sale of a strategic asset.

·      Loss of majority control rights but maintaining the ability to block any takeover.

·      Accessing higher total returns through reinvesting sale proceeds in other asset classes brings other risks, which would be managed through additional diversification.

The consultation process included two key supporting documents, the PWC Divestment Case and the Cameron Partners Potential Sell Down report.

While the reports included modelling of potential future dividends, the impact of potential increased dividends were not included in the LTP financial forecasts due to the uncertainty over the decisions to enable the managed sell-down process, likely timing of any sale and the future use of proceeds.

4.1      Financial implications of managed sell-down

The Cameron Partners modelling suggested that selling $1.1 billion worth of PoTL shares could increase the QHL dividend to Council by $7 million in the year after sale and by a cumulative $185 million over the following 10 years. This modelling is based on multiple assumptions including that:

·      The proceeds of the PoTL managed sell down are used to repay the PPS with the remainder reinvested based on the current QHL Statement of Investment Policies and Objectives.

·      The current Dividend Distribution Policy is used to set QHL dividends to Council, which smooths changes to dividends over time.

The current Distribution Policy includes the concept of a dividend reset. If a dividend reset were applied after managed sell-down of the PoTL shares, the QHL dividend to Council would increase by $11 million in the year after sale, based on the Cameron Partners modelling.

Therefore, as a rule of thumb, selling $100 million of PoTL shares could result in an immediate increase of the QHL dividend to Council of around $1 million, which would continue to increase over time subject to investment performance.

These dividend estimates are used to illustrate one potential benefit of the managed sell down, which could include options other than increased dividends to Council.

4.2      Submissions received

Council received Long Term Plan Consultation Document question responses and written submissions, and at Hearings submitter’s presented views in person.

The submissions process is a necessary part of the decision making process and informs Councillors of the views of the community. As well as the submission points raised, Councillors consider other factors like expert advice.

After consideration of late submissions, 130 submissions to the question in the Consultation Document supported Option 1 (status quo) and 132 submissions supported Option 2 (managed sell down to a minimum of 28%).

An analysis of the reasons given in submissions for supporting an option is provided in the following remarks along with a summary of submission themes. This summary is not intended to cover all submission points or give weight to one submission point over others. In determining a decision on this matter, it will be for councillors to assess and balance points made following reading all submissions, and hearing from submitters at the Hearings.

4.2.1    Reasons given in support of Option 1 (status quo)

The most common reason given for retaining the PoTL shareholding is that the shares generate a dividend that is used to benefit the region through reduced rates. Other reasons given were that a decision to sell down was short-sighted and would lead to rates increases in the future.

General support was given for the status quo and the importance of involvement/control in PoTL decision making. This included comments about:

·      the national/regional significance of the PoTL,

·      the importance of local ownership,

·      the power to appoint directors,

·      the threats posed by new owners and

·      the risk of not having local and community interests at the forefront.

Some submitters also saw portfolio diversification as a risk because new investments could not be guaranteed to match the performance of the PoTL and that there was not enough information about new investments.

These are summarised themes and must be read and evaluated by Councillors in conjunction with all submissions and material provided at Hearings.

4.2.2    Reasons given is support of Option 2 (managed sell-down)

Submitters in favour of Option 2 provided comments in support of the reasoning for a proposed sell-down outlined in the CD and supporting documents.

Many submissions suggested conditions and considerations for a sell-down process. These included suggestions on the use of the proceeds including to fund infrastructure, resilience, and well-being projects; limiting the sale of shares to local or New Zealand residents and not using proceeds to subsidise rates.

Submissions from Māori were generally in favour of enabling the managed sell-down. They raised considerations for greater tangata whenua involvement in the decision-making process, tangata whenua participation in the sale through potential preferential processes including discounts or deferred payment and retaining local ownership. This included consideration of the impacts that the PoTL has had on tangata whenua customary rights and land ownership.

These are summarised themes and must be read and evaluated by Councillors in conjunction with all submissions and material provided at Hearings.

4.3      Proposed decision making process

The proposed managed sell-down process, if enabled, requires further definition of the process to be followed including key principles, parameters and constraints.

Significant issues were raised through LTP submissions, and at Hearings, in relation to the process for divestment. These are in addition to those highlighted in this report relating to the decision to provide for the ability to enable a managed sell down. This included matters such as the minimum percentage to sell down to.

To address these issues, and to recognise that not all submission points have so far been addressed through the process so far, it is proposed that Council follow a three step process. This process highlights that should Council approve Step 1, this would be with the understanding that a full external legal review, Office of the Auditor General, and Audit process has been undertaken, and that the requirements of the Local Government Act 2002 have been navigated to provide for the ability to enable a managed sell down of the PoTL shareholding in the 2024 – 2034 Long Term Plan.

Subsequent steps (shown in summary as Steps 2 and 3 below) would require an assessment of legislative requirements and implications, and depending on the specific matters that the Council determines are required, may require further consultation and process step approval.

Process Step Summary:

Long Term Plan 2024 -2034:

·      Step 1 – Decision on whether to enable a managed sell-down as part of the LTP.

If Step 1 enables a managed sell-down, then two further steps follow.

Future Annual Plan/ Long Term Plan processes, if required:

·      Step 2 – Design and approve the managed sell-down process including any key principles, parameters, or constraints.

·      Step 3 – Execute the managed sell-down process, noting that the actual sale will not proceed if Council’s expectations are not met.

The adoption of the Long Term Plan 2024 – 2034 seeks Council’s approval for Step 1. There is no clear timeframe to undertake Steps 2 and 3 for Council. This timeframe is expected to require time for Councillor workshops, and engagement processes.

If Council decides to enable a managed sell-down, it is recommended that Council approves $300,000 to complete subsequent steps and process, including the required legal review. 

4.4      Recommendations

In relation to the decision to enable a managed sell-down, it is recommended that Councillors consider if any submitters have raised any substantial matters that Councillors had not already carefully considered as part of making the proposal to enable a managed sell down to a minimum of 28%. There are none that are being highlighted by staff through this process.

It is recommended, as set out as the preferred option in the Consultation Document, that the LTP is prepared to enable the managed sell-down of the PoTL shares to a minimum of shareholding of 28%.

As mentioned, where Submitters, including iwi and mana/tangata whenua, have raised a range of considerations for any sell-down process, these, and other considerations, need to be considered in the design of the sell-down process. This is a subsequent step and dependent on Step 1.

Designing the managed sell down process is likely to require substantial advice, engagement, and support. Therefore:

It is recommended that $300,000 is budgeted for specialist advice to Council so that Council can appropriately direct Quayside Holdings Limited in designing the managed sell-down process including ensuring appropriate engagement with tangata whenua and consideration of submissions that raised issues related to the potential sale process or conditions of the potential sale.

Decisions

The decision to enable a managed sell-down and the design of the process is not a final decision to sell any shares in PoTL. A decision to sell will depend on the conditions of the managed sell-down process being met and market conditions. 

For certainty, if a decision is made by Council to enable a managed sale of Port of Tauranga shares in the LTP, Quayside Holdings Limited’s Statement of Intent (SOI) for 2024/25 should reflect that any such sale is conditional on Council approving the managed sale process, and on Council agreeing that all parameters set in the sale process have been met.

Quayside Holdings Limited is expected to deliver its final SOI for 2024/25 on or around 20 June.  If necessary following receipt of this SOI, it is recommended that Council directs Quayside Holdings Limited, by resolution, to modify its SOI to state that the sale of any Port of Tauranga shares is conditional on Council approving the managed sale process, and on Council agreeing that all parameters set in the sale process have been met.  The process for modifying an SOI by shareholder resolution is set out in Part 6, Schedule 8 of the Local Government Act.

5.        Considerations

5.1      Risks and Mitigations

There are no significant risks associated with this matter/subject/project/initiative.

5.2      Climate Change

The matters addressed in this report are of a procedural nature and there is no need to consider climate change impacts.

5.3      Implications for Māori

Specific implication for Māori are discussed in each deliberations paper.

 

5.4      Community Engagement

 

Adobe Systems

CONSULT

Whakauiuia

To obtain input or feedback from affected communities about our analysis, alternatives, and /or proposed decisions.

Information and recommendations in this paper have been informed by submissions received.

5.5      Financial Implications

If the recommendation is adopted by Council, will it result in:

-   Unbudgeted work during the current financial year?

-   Unbudgeted work for any of the years remaining in the current Long Term Plan?

If the answer is ‘no’ to both questions please select the dropdown option 1 and complete appropriately.

If the answer is ‘yes’ to either question please select “Budget Implications” in the building block below and liaise with your Management Accountant in order to complete the Financial Impact table.

This paper outlines the overall financial context for decision making and potential rates impacts of updated financial forecasts.

 

6.        Next Steps

Next Steps: What next? What resources are needed? Further analysis? Timeframes ahead. Any consultation planned. Remind Council of the process ahead. Next update to Council?

Conclusion: Short concluding remarks. Referring back to recommendations. No new content.

Following deliberations, the LTP financial estimates will be updated, audited, and prepared for Council adoption.

Attachments

Attachment 1 - Rates Stacked Bar Graph - Median Properties

Attachment 2 - Preferred Issues and Options - Financial Summary  

 

 

 


Regional Council                                                                                                          28 May 2024

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Regional Council                                                                                                                           28 May 2024

 

 


 

 

 

Report To:

Regional Council

Meeting Date:

28 May 2024

Report Writer:

Gillian Payne, Principal Advisor; Mark Le Comte, Principal Advisor, Finance and Kumaren Perumal, Chief Financial Officer

Report Authoriser:

Mat Taylor, General Manager, Corporate

Purpose:

To consider and make decisions on submissions received and the draft Revenue and Financing Policy.

 

 

Draft Revenue and Financing Policy - Submissions and Deliberations

 

Executive Summary

On 6 March 2024 Council proposed changes to its Revenue and Financing Policy (RFP) for public consultation.

This paper and the attached Issues and Options paper presents the public feedback received and enables Council to decide whether to

·      confirm its proposed changes to the RFP, as documented in the draft RFP approved for public consultation (Attachment 1) and draft Funding Needs Analysis (Attachment 2)

or

·      Direct staff to make changes to the draft RFP through decisions made at this meeting.

Following this meeting, staff will prepare a final RFP and Funding Needs Analysis for adoption in late June 2024.  The draft 2024-2034 Long Term Plan will also be updated (if necessary) to reflect the funding sources in the RFP.

 

 

Recommendations

That the Regional Council:

1        Receives the report, Draft Revenue and Financing Policy - Submissions and Deliberations;

2        Considers the submissions received and the options presented in this paper and the attached Issues and Options paper, and requests that staff prepare a final version of the Revenue and Financing Policy and Funding Needs Analysis, for adoption in June 2024, incorporating Council’s preferred options from the consultation documents, as follows:

 

Activity

Funding proposal/ preferred option

Urban public transport

Rates funding for public transport in urban centres comes from 90% targeted and 10% general rates

Rotorua Catchments

Phase out targeted rates in favour of general rates, implemented in stages from 2025/26 through 2027/28.

Rotorua Air (excluding Clean Heat Loans)

Rotorua air quality regulatory compliance work (excluding clean heat loans and grants) is funded from general rates.

3        Notes that staff will respond to each submitter, summarising the overall feedback received and explaining Council’s decisions regarding the Revenue and Financing Policy and the reasons for the decisions.

 

1.        Introduction

On 6 March 2024 Council proposed changes to its Revenue and Financing Policy (RFP) for public consultation.

Council prepared a Statement of Proposal and sought feedback through the same channels that were used for the draft Long Term Plan 2024-2034 (LTP) consultation process, as described in section 3.4 of this report.

Figure 1 below summarises the key changes proposed.

Figure 1 – Key changes in draft Revenue and Financing Policy, for public consultation

Activity

Funding proposal

Urban public transport

Rates funding for public transport in urban centres comes from 90% targeted and 10% general rates (status quo is 100% targeted rates)

Rotorua Catchments

Staged implementation to phase out targeted rates in favour of general rates (status quo is equal shares of targeted rates and general funds). 

Implementation proposed to be from 2025/26 through 2027/28.

Rotorua Air (excluding Clean Heat Loans)

Rotorua air quality regulatory compliance work (excluding clean heat loans and grants) is funded from general rates (status quo is targeted rate over Rotorua urban area for 50% of the operating costs, and the balance from general funds)

 

1.1      Legislative Framework

Council is required to have a RFP under section 102(2)(a) of the Local Government Act 2002 (LGA).  The RFP is required to support the Principles in the Preamble to the Te Ture Whenua Māori Act in terms of LGA section 102(3A).

1.2      Alignment with Strategic Framework

 

A Healthy Environment

 

Freshwater for Life

 

Safe and Resilient Communities

 

A Vibrant Region

We work with and connect the right people to create a prosperous region and economy.

The Way We Work

We honour our obligations to Māori.

The above analysis relates to the current Community Outcomes.  The attached Issues and Options paper contains an analysis against the proposed new Community Outcomes and Goals.

1.2.1    Community Well-beings Assessment

Dominant Well-Beings Affected

þ Environmental

Low - Positive

¨ Cultural

Low - Positive

¨ Social

Low - Positive

¨ Economic

Medium - Positive

 

 

1.3      Significant Plan or Policy Inconsistency

The decision sought in this meeting will result in a revised RFP which will be effective from 1 July 2024 and replace the previous RFP.

2.        Decisions arising from submissions

2.1      Funding of urban Public Transport

2.1.1    Submission feedback summary

The table below summarises the responses received to Question 1 through the Participate survey and emailed feedback.

 

Number of submitters

Support Option 1 Rates funding is 100% targeted rates (status quo)

116

Support Option 2 Rates funding split is 90% targeted rates and 10% general funds (proposed)

133

No option selected, comments only

37

Total

286

Themes within comments on proposed funding sources for urban public transport included:

·      Public transport should be user-pays, self-funding through fares

·      Central government should pay to assist meeting national emission targets

·      Support for 100% targeted rates

·      Supports Council’s rationale for a contribution from general rates

Support for proposed 90:10 ratio of targeted to general rates

Support for a higher share of general rates e.g. 20%, or more

·      Questions the equity of the proposal, noting that rural areas/small settlements paying more through general rates (in Council’s proposal) are:

considered least able to afford the increase

have relatively poor access to public transport.

·      Suggests that to address equity issues, general rates funding be used to improve services outside the main urban areas.

2.1.2    Issues and options paper and staff recommendation

Attachment 3 is an Issues and Options paper with further details of submission feedback, options analysis and staff recommendations on funding of urban public transport.

2.2      Funding of Rotorua Catchments activity

2.2.1    Submission feedback

Only one submission was received on this topic, which opposed the proposal to phase out targeted rates in favour of general rates.

The reason cited was user-pays principles which suggest that those within the Rotorua catchment area should be paying. 

2.2.2    Recommendation

When the draft RFP was adopted for consultation, Council considered the impact that an immediate move from targeted rates to general rates would have on the overall increase in general rates.  As a result Council proposed to transition the change from targeted rates to general rates over four years, starting in 2025/26.

Staff recommend that Council confirm the proposal.

2.3      Funding of Rotorua Air activity

2.3.1    Submission feedback

Only one submission was received on this topic, which supported the proposal to fund the Rotorua air quality regulatory compliance work (excluding Clean Heat Loans) from general rates.

2.3.2    Recommendation

Staff recommend that the RFP proposal to fund the Rotorua air quality compliance work from general funds is confirmed.

3.        Considerations

3.1      Risks and Mitigations

There are no significant risks associated with this matter/subject/project/initiative.

3.2      Climate Change

The effects of climate change on the suitability of funding sources proposed in the draft RFP were considered during the development of the draft policy for public consultation.

3.3      Implications for Māori

The RFP is required to support the Principles in the Preamble to the Te Ture Whenua Māori Act (TTWMA Principles) in terms of LGA section 102(3A).

Council considered the TTWMA Principles before it adopted its draft RFP and Statement of Proposal in March 2024.  The options presented in the Statement of Proposal, on which Council is deliberating in this meeting, are not of a magnitude to change that consideration. 

Council has also noted previously that the TTWMA Principles are best addressed through Council’s Rates Remission and Postponement Policies, particularly the policy relating to Māori Freehold Land.  A Statement of Proposal and draft Rates Remission and Postponement Policy for Māori Freehold Land was available for public consultation alongside the LTP.

 

3.4      Community Engagement

The draft RFP and statement of Proposal was open for consultation from 8 March 2024 to 9 April 2024, as part of the LTP consultation.

Engagement on the draft RFP was encouraged at all the LTP events, particularly because question 1 in the RFP consultation survey in Participate (urban public transport funding) was the same question included in the LTP Consultation Document. 

The opportunity to comment on the draft RFP was promoted at the following events:

·      Briefings to each of the Bay of Plenty territorial authorities

·      Online hui with Māori constituency Councillors (x3)

·      Chamber of Commerce - Business at Breakfast

·      Events at

Bayfair, Tauranga

Kuirau Park markets, Rotorua,

Multicultural Festival, Tauranga

Rangitāiki River Festival, Thornton.

 

3.5      Financial Implications

 

Financial implications of the options are included in the attached Issues and Options paper.

 

4.        Next Steps

Council decisions at this meeting will direct staff to prepare a final RFP and Funding Needs Analysis for adoption in late June 2024.  The LTP will also be updated (if necessary) to reflect the funding sources in the RFP.

Following adoption of the RFP, responses to submitters will be prepared and sent.

 

Attachments

Attachment 1 - Draft Revenue and Financing Policy 2024 for consultation

Attachment 2 - Draft Funding Needs Analysis for consultation

Attachment 3 - Issues and Options Paper - RFP- Urban Public Transport Funding  

 


Regional Council                                                                                                                           28 May 2024

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Regional Council                                                                                                          28 May 2024

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Report To:

Regional Council

Meeting Date:

28 May 2024

Report Writer:

Olive McVicker, Corporate Performance Team Lead; Santiago Bermeo, Economist; Helen Creagh, Rotorua Catchments Manager; Pim De Monchy, Coastal Catchments Manager and Nassah Rolleston-Steed, Principal Advisor, Policy and Planning

Report Authoriser:

Chris Ingle, General Manager, Integrated Catchments

Purpose:

To provide Council the results of the consultation for investigating regional parks and provides further detail on the Ohau Wall, Whakatāne Harbour Call and the Wairoa River Strategy.

 

 

A Healthy Environment - Regional Parks, Ohau wall, Wairoa River Strategy and Whakatane Harbour Bar Calling

 

Executive Summary

This paper for the outcome ‘A Healthy Environment’ includes three key activities impacted by the consultation and hearings process.  They are:

1.   Catchments (including Regional Parks) – result of the regional parks question in the consultation document.

A total of 274 responses were received to the question ‘Should Regional Council investigate new opportunities for regional parks? ’The results show that 67% were in favour of this proposal and 33% were against.  Full analysis of the submissions received are provided in the issues and options paper in Attachment 1. 

Note that with the gifting of the Western Bay property, it is proposed that the funding originally allocated to investigations will be used to cover some capital to ensure safety and compliance with environmental standards.

2.  Ohau Wall technical issues.

3.  Maritime Operations – the decision to stop the Whakatāne harbour bar call.

4.  Freshwater Programme – scheduling of the Wairoa River Strategy review and Catchment Management Plan request.

NOTE: issues and options papers have not been prepared for items 2, 3 & 4.  These points are for Council information, and any financial implications ie. removing the bar call was included in the financials adopted for consultation.

 

Recommendations

That the Regional Council:

1        Receives the report, A Healthy Environment - Regional Parks, Ohau wall, Wairoa River Strategy and Whakatane Harbour Bar Calling;

2        Confirms the resolutions of the Hot Springs road report to Council on 9 May, noting again the generous donation of this property by the Noble family;

3        Agrees to proceed on a business case for a regional park in the Rotorua District, as proposed in the draft LTP,

4        Reapportions the $150,000 investigatory budget in year 2 for the Rotorua business case; so that the Rotorua investigation is allocated $100,000, and Hot Springs Road is allocated $50,000; and that an additional $50,000 per annum is budgeted for years 3-10 of the LTP for property management and maintenance for Hot Springs Road;

5        Agrees to the forming of a technical working group for assessing potential solutions for the issues with the Ohau Wall;

6        Accepts the recommendation that the Wairoa Catchment Management Plan will not be funded in year one of the LTP;

7        Supports the Harbourmaster’s decision for the Whakatāne Bar Call;

8        Confirms the decision has a medium level of significance as determined by the Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy. Council has identified and assessed different options and considered community views as part of making the decision, in proportion to the level of significance.

 

1.        Introduction

This paper provides the details of the key decisions made on activities for the Healthy Environment Outcome.  They are:

·      Regional Parks – response to consultation question, and reassessment of the project in light of the Noble family gifting the land for the Western Bay park to Council.  Further detail is in the issues and options paper (Attachment 1).

·      The Ohau Wall repair – concerns raised by submitters.

·      The Whakatāne Harbour Bar Call – decisions made and supporting actions.

·      The Wairoa River Strategy – decision not to accelerate to year one of the LTP.

Further details and analysis are provided in section 2 of this paper.

 

1.1      Legislative Framework

Council is required to have a Long Term Plan under section 93 of the Local Government Act 2002 (LGA).  Schedule 10 of the LGA also requires Council to provide financial forecast statements.

1.2      Alignment with Strategic Framework

 

A Healthy Environment

We protect and enhance our air, land freshwater, geothermal, marine, coastal resources, and biodiversity for our communities. We support others to do the same.

Freshwater for Life

Our water and land management practices maintain and improve the life-giving ability of the region’s freshwater resources.

Safe and Resilient Communities

We support community safety through flood protection and navigation safety.

A Vibrant Region

Our stewardship of natural resources and the connections we make provides for sustainable economic development across our region.

 

Council has reviewed and proposed a new strategic framework/direction including new community outcomes for the LTP.  If council adopts the new strategic direction, this will replace the current Community Outcomes from 1 July 2024.

 

1.2.1    Community Well-beings Assessment

Dominant Well-Beings Affected

þ Environmental

Medium - Positive

þ Cultural

Medium - Positive

þ Social

Medium - Positive

þ Economic

Medium - Positive

The purpose of Local Government includes promoting the social, economic, environmental, and cultural well-being of communities in the present and for the future.

Identify which dominant Community Well-being(s) the project/proposal will affect.  Also indicate what level of impact and what effect the project/proposal will have on the relevant well-being(s).  For instance consider:

•  Will the project/proposal have a high, medium or low impact on the well-being(s)?

•  Are the effects of the impacts positive and/or negative? 

•  Describing simply the overall impact of the project/proposal.

•  Providing an explanation if there are positive and negative impacts for each well-being(s).

•  Identifying if your assessment of the actual or proposed impact is backed by evidence.

Also consider identifying if there are any relevant considerations against the Living Standards Framework.

Further guidelines available here.

 

1.3      Significance

The recommended proposal/decision has been assessed against the criteria and thresholds in Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy, and can be considered:

Medium

The decision is not within existing budgets and does not implement the current long term plan or annual plan.

 

 

2.        A Healthy Environment

 

2.1      Healthy Catchments

2.1.2    Catchments (including Regional Parks)

As part of the LTP process the opportunity to investigate the acquisition of further regional parks was identified.  The proposed parks are in the Rotorua and Western Bay of Plenty districts. 

A total of 274 response were received for the regional park question, with 67% in favour and 33% against. Key themes identified are identified in the table below.

Regional Council should investigate new opportunities for regional parks

Regional Council should not investigate new opportunities for regional parks

·      Secure for future generations

·      Allows for other outdoor activities

·      Environmental benefits

·      Existing facilities are at capacity

·      Impact on rates, there are other priorities

·      Already sufficient parks in the region

·      Not a regional council responsibility.

·      Loss of food producing land

A total budget of $450,000 was identified, for years one and two of the LTP.  In May 2024 the Noble family gifted the land for the Western Bay regional park to the Regional Council.  As a result, the investigatory funding is no longer required.  However, the land will incur management and fixed costs until further decisions regarding development are made. 

The issues and options paper (Attachment 1) identifies three options for Council’s consideration.  In summary (relative to the budget in the draft LTP adopted for consultation and excluding inflation adjustment), the options available are:

 

Western Bay Regional Park

Rotorua Regional Park

Net change

1.

Do nothing

-$150,000

Do nothing

-$300,000

-$450,000

2.

Repurpose budget for development and maintenance

No change
($150,000)

Complete investigations

No change ($300,000)

$0 (Nil)

No change

3.

Repurpose and increase year two budget

Allow further $50,000 pa for maintenance and management years 3-10 of LTP

+$50,000

 

+$400,000

Allocate portion of year two budget to Western Bay park

-$50,000

$0 (Nil)

 

+$400,000

2.1.3    Ohau Wall issues

Following the hearing of submitters on this matter, staff recommend forming a technical working group of engineers who can then assess the options for addressing the issues with the Ohau wall, prior to Council investing in the longer term solution.

In the meantime it is recommended we keep the funding repairs budget in year 2 of the Long Term Plan, noting this can be brought forward if needed.

2.1.4    Wairoa River Catchment Management Plan

TCC requested in their submission that council include funding from year one of the LTP to support the development and future monitoring of a whole of Wairoa River specific Catchment Management Plan as part of the broader development of the Freshwater Management Unit for the Tauranga Moana Harbour. 

This request has been considered by staff and the request by TCC is not supported based on the following:

·      The Wairoa River Strategy would need to be updated first, as noted by TCC at the LTP hearing.  Both TCC and WBOPDC deferred this update to occur following the BOPRC notifying the Essential Freshwater Policy Programme (EFPP) changes to the RPS and RNRP in 2025/26.

·      A comprehensive and coordinated approach must be taken to monitoring water quality across the region and Tauranga Moana FMU including its sub-catchments.

·      A monitoring plan will be developed as part of the EFPP, which is still in train.

·      Decisions on reprioritising catchment specific works, and monitoring and implementation specific to water quality purposes should be informed by the EFPP and corresponding RPS and RNRP provisions.

·      Water quality is only a subset of the focus of the operative Wairoa River Strategy which is primarily concerned about the effects of land use change and development, particularly urbanisation

·      Tauranga City Council should lead the development and implementation of a Cultural Health Baseline Index (CHBI) as part of the Tauriko West Comprehensive Stormwater Consent (CSC) as its genesis is directly associated with tangata whenua concerns with the urbanisation of the Tauriko West urban growth area

·      BOPRC staff can offer water quality expertise to provide feedback and guidance to TCC and tangata whenua in developing a CHBI for water quality monitoring associated with the Tauriko West CSC

·      BOPRC is likely to be able to support iwi and hapū with CBHI initiatives upstream and downstream of the Tauriko West CSC monitoring boundaries over time within existing budgets.

·      BOPRCs current fiscal situation and the likely known and unknown costs of committing to resourcing a whole of Wairoa River Catchment Management Plan means making a commitment at this time is high risk.

 

2.2      Regulatory Services

2.2.2    Maritime Operations

In September 2023, council reviewed all activities and discussed the calling of the Whakatāne bar.

The Harbourmaster identified that the “calling of the bar” was an unsafe practice and caused skippers to rely on the call to decide as to whether it was safe to cross the bar. The condition of the bar varies throughout the day and crucial factors like the size and capacity of the boat as well as the experience of the skipper were ignored when the bar was “called”.

Ultimately it is the skipper’s responsibility to determine whether it is safe to cross the bar with their particular craft, hence the Harbourmaster team is looking to ensure more suitable tools are available to assist skippers to make this decision.

The Harbourmaster team is working closely with the Whakatane Coastguard to upgrade the current bar camera with the intention to install two cameras both of which are more accurate and clearer to provide a clear visual perspective of the bar condition. In addition, educational campaigns targeting bar crossing safety like bar crossing safety seminars will be provided.

The decision to stop calling the bar in Whakatāne is a decision for the Harbourmaster and it is in line with advice from Maritime NZ[1].

3.        Considerations

3.1      Risks and Mitigations

Key risks: explain what is unknown and possible financial, health and safety, reputational or environmental impacts could be. Include proposed mitigations. Cover the full range of risks. Consider: Health and Safety, Stakeholder, Legal, Financial, Trade-offs, Timing, and Communications. See Guideline material for details.

Identify the risks that will occur if the above decision is agreed upon vs the risks involved if the above decision is not agreed.

Identify how these risks will be mitigated or minimised.

If unsure or there is any doubt regarding the level of risk, please discuss with your GM.

Please refer to the relevant analysis in the options paper attached for the Regional Parks.  The Western Bay property requires immediate work to address some health and safety and environmental issues, consistent with the purpose to develop it as a Regional Park.

In response to the cancellation of the Harbour Call the current bar cam is being upgraded to install two cameras to provide a clear visual perspective of the bar condition and targeted educational programmes will be organised.

 

3.2      Climate Change

The aim of this section is to ensure your thinking and assumptions around climate change are explicit and to provide visibility as to how our work relates to climate change. Consider:

·   Is the initiative sensitive to climate (e.g. changes in rainfall, temperature, wind, sea-level)? If so, what are the likely impacts and how have they been accounted for?

·   In what way does the initiative relate to climate change (use the building block below to illustrate)?

·   Which of the guiding principles does the initiative encompass in relation to climate change (see the detailed guidance for information on these principles)? Provide more detail where appropriate.

Use the building block below when considering Climate Change implications.

Crtl + click for guideline material.

Please refer to the relevant analysis in the options paper attached.  The intention to retire farmland and plant native forests at both regional parks would reduce emissions, increase carbon sequestration and improve local resilience to extreme weather events. These benefits were considered in further detail in previous papers on this topic in December 2023 and May 2024.

The decision not to bring forward the review of the Wairoa River Strategy and not to fund the Whakatāne Harbour Call is of a procedural nature and doesn’t impact climate change

 

3.3      Implications for Māori

Council has responsibilities to Māori under the LGA and the RMA. We are required to meet those responsibilities and identify any potential implications for Māori.  Please consider including this section for reports going to all committees.  The following questions will aid your analysis:

·    Are there any positive or negative effects on Māori (social, cultural or economic)?

·    What consultation/engagement has been undertaken with Māori and what form did it take? How did Māori contribute to this decision?

·    Does the issue require consideration of: iwi planning documents, Treaty settlement legislation or any other document expressing matters of importance to Māori?

Crtl + click for Guideline material.

Due to the commercial sensitivity of acquiring the land for regional parks, full consultation with Māori has not occurred.  Once acquired the development and management of these areas would ideally be done in partnership with local iwi/hapu..

Council maintains communications with Māori in regard to the freshwater monitoring and this will continue.

There was no consultation with Māori in regard to the Whakatāne Harbour Call however opportunities to engage with the education programmes will be available.

3.4      Community Engagement

What level of engagement is council commited to? What actions will be taken

Consider identifying in the report:

• Council’s knowledge of community views on the subject.

• What aspect of the community is involved.

• How the views of the community were obtained.

• How the views were recorded and reported.

Adobe Systems

CONSULT

Whakauiuia

To obtain input or feedback from affected communities about our analysis, alternatives, and /or proposed decisions.

The question should we investigate new opportunities for regional parks was included in the consultation document and consulted from 8 March to 9 April 2024. See the attached issues and options paper for further detail on this.

 

3.5      Financial Implications

If the recommendation is adopted by Council, will it result in:

-   Unbudgeted work during the current financial year?

-   Unbudgeted work for any of the years remaining in the current Long Term Plan?

If the answer is ‘no’ to both questions please select the dropdown option 1 and complete appropriately.

If the answer is ‘yes’ to either question please select “Budget Implications” in the building block below and liaise with your Management Accountant in order to complete the Financial Impact table.

Full financial information for the Regional Parks are contained in section 2.1.1 of this report and the issues and options paper (Attachment 1)

The removal of the Whakatāne Harbour Call, and the Wairoa River Strategy do not require any changes to the consultation budget.

4.        Next Steps

Next Steps: What next? What resources are needed? Further analysis? Timeframes ahead. Any consultation planned. Remind Council of the process ahead. Next update to Council?

Conclusion: Short concluding remarks. Referring back to recommendations. No new content.

At the conclusion of deliberations, staff will incorporate all direction in the draft Long Term Plan 2024-2034.  The draft Long Term Plan 2024-2034 will then undergo a final audit stage with Audit New Zealand prior to it being presented to Council for adoption on 26 June 2024.

Attachments

Attachment 1 - Issues and Options - Regional Parks  

 


Regional Council                                                                                                          28 May 2024

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Report To:

Regional Council

Meeting Date:

28 May 2024

Report Writer:

Mark Townsend, Engineering Manager and Olive McVicker, Corporate Performance Team Lead

Report Authoriser:

Chris Ingle, General Manager, Integrated Catchments

Purpose:

To gain Council direction on key issues and options relating to Future Ready Communities for the Long Term Plan 2024-2034

 

 

Future Ready Communities -  Rivers and Drainage Schemes

 

Executive Summary

Several LTP submissions were made on the affordability of rates rises resulting from flood protection upgrades across the Bay of Plenty Regional Council’s river schemes. These upgrades are driven by climate change impacting sea and river levels during forecasted flood peaks.

The ‘Before the Deluge 2.0’ business case to government is expected to assist Council by sharing the costs of river scheme upgrades, whereas these costs are currently being borne largely by targeted ratepayers in these schemes (80% targeted and 20% general rate funded).

Crown co-investment in river schemes is now accepted as the most efficient and equitable way forward, under a changing climate. The Crown contributions can be built into LTP budgets once the relevant announcements are made by the government. Once an announcement has been made this will result in significantly lower rates.

Direction is also sought from Council on the related topic in this paper:

·           Waioeka-Otara Rivers Scheme – Three additional rain gauges

This initiative is in response to a submission received from Opotiki District Council.  An issues and options paper has been prepared for Council’s deliberation (refer Attachment 1).

 

 

Recommendations

That the Regional Council:

1        Receives the report, Future Ready Communities - Rivers and Drainage Schemes;

2        Notes the government is currently considering funding the ‘before the deluge 2.0’ business case which anticipates Crown co-funding of flood protection for our communities, in adapting to a changing climate;

3        Approves the addition of the three rainfall gauges in the Waioeka Otara River catchments from Year 1 and 2 of the 2024-2034 LTP;

4        Confirms the decision has a medium level of significance as determined by the Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy. Council has identified and assessed different options and considered community views as part of making the decision, in proportion to the level of significance.

 

1.        Introduction

Several LTP submissions were made on the affordability of rates rises resulting from flood protection upgrades across the Bay of Plenty Regional Council’s river schemes. These upgrades are driven by climate change impacting sea and river levels during forecasted flood peaks.

Staff have been working with Government officials, through the Regional Council River Mangers group (part of Te Uru Kahika) to reduce the burden on ratepayers of necessary climate resilience work on Bay of Plenty river schemes.

The ‘Before the Deluge 2.0’ business case to government is expected to assist Council by sharing the costs of river scheme upgrades, whereas these costs are currently being borne largely by targeted ratepayers in these schemes (80% targeted and 20% general rate funded).

Crown co-investment in river schemes is now accepted as the most efficient and equitable way forward, under a changing climate. The Crown contributions can be built into LTP budgets once the relevant announcements are made by the government. Once an announcement has been made this will result in significantly lower rates.

Additionally, a submission received from Ōpōtiki District Council supports the installation of three additional rain gauges for the Waioeka-Otara Rivers Scheme.  It is proposed that two gauges are required in the Otara River Catchment and one in the Waioeka River Catchment.

A full explanation and cost analysis is obtained in the Issues and Options paper in Attachment 1.

1.1      Legislative Framework

Council is required to have a Long Term Plan under section 93 of the Local Government Act 2002 (LGA).  Schedule 10 of the LGA also requires Council to provide financial forecast statements.

1.2      Alignment with Strategic Framework

 

A Healthy Environment

 

Freshwater for Life

 

Safe and Resilient Communities

We support community safety through flood protection and navigation safety.

A Vibrant Region

 

The Way We Work

 

Council has reviewed and proposed a new strategic framework/direction including new community outcomes for the next Long Term Plan 2024-2034. If Council adopts the new strategic direction, this will replace the current Community Outcomes from 1 July 2024.

The paper in Attachment 1 aligns the project to the new draft strategic framework.

1.2.1    Community Well-beings Assessment

Dominant Well-Beings Affected

þ Environmental

 

þ Cultural

 

þ Social

 

þ Economic

 

 

 

1.3      Significance

The recommended proposal/decision has been assessed against the criteria and thresholds in Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy, and can be considered:

Medium

The decision is not within existing budgets and does not implement the current long term plan or annual plan.

 

2.        Key Decisions

2.1      Waioeka-Otara Rivers Scheme - Rain Gauges

To monitor rainfall this rivers scheme is reliant on a rain radar station located in the Mamaku Plateau.  This is a significant distance from the Waioeka-Otara Rivers Scheme.  This means that some of the rain falling in these two river catchments cannot be detected by the rain radar.

The installation of the rain gauges will enable monitoring of the rain that is actually falling in the area.  This can result in more timely responses in emergency flooding events.

Full details are provided in the Issues and Options paper, Attachment 1.

3.        Considerations

3.1      Risks and Mitigations

The installation of these rain gauges will improve flood forecasting for Ōpōtiki and will increase the time available to undertake emergency responses.

 

3.2      Climate Change

The aim of this section is to ensure your thinking and assumptions around climate change are explicit and to provide visibility as to how our work relates to climate change. Consider:

·   Is the initiative sensitive to climate (e.g. changes in rainfall, temperature, wind, sea-level)? If so, what are the likely impacts and how have they been accounted for?

·   In what way does the initiative relate to climate change (use the building block below to illustrate)?

·   Which of the guiding principles does the initiative encompass in relation to climate change (see the detailed guidance for information on these principles)? Provide more detail where appropriate.

Use the building block below when considering Climate Change implications.

Crtl + click for guideline material.

 

Mitigation

Adaptation

Reduce GHG emissions

Produce GHG emissions

Sequester carbon

Anticipate climate change impacts

Respond to climate change impacts

The installation of these gauges will enable a more timely emergency response in significant rainfall events which have been increasing in recent years

3.3      Implications for Māori

There are significant iwi land holdings in this area.  The installation of the rain gauges will provide an early warning for any significant rainfall events.  This provides time for those communities potentially impacted by flooding to respond to the situation.

 

3.4      Community Engagement

 

Adobe Systems

INFORM

Whakamōhio

To provide affected communities with balanced and objective information to assist them in understanding the problems, alternatives and/or solutions.

Please refer to the Issues and Options Paper attached.

 

3.5      Financial Implications

If the recommendation is adopted by Council, will it result in:

-   Unbudgeted work during the current financial year?

-   Unbudgeted work for any of the years remaining in the current Long Term Plan?

If the answer is ‘no’ to both questions please select the dropdown option 1 and complete appropriately.

If the answer is ‘yes’ to either question please select “Budget Implications” in the building block below and liaise with your Management Accountant in order to complete the Financial Impact table.

The capital cost of purchasing and installing the gauges, can be funded from existing capital budgets for the river scheme (20% general, 80% targeted rate funded)

In year two of the LTP, additional operating costs of $65,000pa are requested for maintenance of the new sites, and will be funded from general rates.

Please refer to the financial tables in the Issues and Options paper attached for more information.

 

4.        Next Steps

Next Steps: What next? What resources are needed? Further analysis? Timeframes ahead. Any consultation planned. Remind Council of the process ahead. Next update to Council?

Conclusion: Short concluding remarks. Referring back to recommendations. No new content.

At the conclusion of deliberations, staff will incorporate direction received into the Long Term Plan 2024-2034, prior to it being presented to Council for adoption on 26 June on 2024.

Attachments

Attachment 1 - Issues and Options - Rainfall Gauges Waioeka and Otara Rivers PDF  

 


Regional Council                                                                                                          28 May 2024

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Report To:

Regional Council

Meeting Date:

28 May 2024

Report Writer:

Michael Seabourne, Director, Public Transport

Report Authoriser:

Mat Taylor, General Manager, Corporate

Purpose:

To gain Council direction on key issues and options relating to Transportation activities for the Long Term Plan 2024-2034

 

 

Connected Communities - Transport

 

Executive Summary

To gain Council decisions on the following key topics:

·      Community Connect Funding;

·      Tertiary Services; and

·      Increasing School Bus Services. 

 

Recommendations

That the Regional Council:

1        Receives the report, Connected Communities – Transport;

2        Directs one of the following options relating to Community Connect Funding for incorporation into the draft LTP for adoption:

(a)  Option 1: Council maintains the current fare structure; or

(b)  Option 2 (Public Transport Committee recommendation): Council reverts to the pre-June 2023 fare structure; or

(c)  Option 3: Council implements full fare structure.

3        Directs one of the following options relating to Tertiary Services for incorporation into the draft LTP for adoption:

(a)  Option 1: Council retains Tertiary Services with existing free fares; or

(b)  Option 2: (staff recommendation) Council retains Tertiary Services and introduces tertiary student fares.

4        Directs one of the following options relating to increasing School Bus Services for incorporation into the draft LTP for adoption:

(a)  Option 1: Council does not provide additional dedicated school services where increased demand exceeds existing capacity; or

(b)  Option 2 (staff recommendation): Council allocates funding to provide an additional 11 daily dedicated school bus trips, serving nine schools.

5        Confirms the decision has a medium level of significance as determined by the Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy. Council has identified and assessed different options and considered community views as part of making the decision, in proportion to the level of significance.

 

1.        Introduction

This paper focusses on three key decisions, related to the following topics:

1.   Community Connect Funding;

2.   Tertiary Services; and

3.   Increasing School Bus Services.

This paper provides the following to support Council’s decision making:

·      Brief background and operating context;

·      Consideration of strategic context and the significance of the decisions; and

·      An overview of each of the topics, options, and associated financial implications.

Each of option includes a supporting Issues and Options paper as an attachment, which provides additional supporting details. These can be found as Attachments 1 to 5. 

1.1      National Context

Our region is facing significant challenges in securing Waka Kotahi funding to co-invest in a transport network people can rely on, that supports future growth and reduces impediments to the movement of people and goods. Transport and infrastructure funding, New Zealand wide, is significantly constrained.

The coalition government released its Government Policy Statement on Land Transport 2024 (GPS 2024) in March. The GPS 2024 reintroduces a ‘value for money’ narrative with a focus on increasing economic growth and productivity.

This reorientation focuses spending on the delivery and maintenance of local roads and state highways, including the delivery of Roads of Regional and National Significance (RORS & RONS)[2] and outcomes to support resilience and safety.

1.2      Regional Context

The Long-Term Plan is being developed, concurrently, alongside the region’s RLTP 2024-34. The RLTP will shortly be adopted by the Regional Transport Committee (RTC).

The RLTP is a funding bid developed on behalf of the RTC, for the region. It sets the strategic vision for transport outcomes across the region and includes a proposed 10-year programme of work. The programme includes a number of Regional Council activities and importantly, costs associated with the delivery of public transport service delivery. 

Once submitted to government, specifically Waka Kotahi New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA), the RLTP will be tested against the priorities laid out in the GPS 2024. Funding will then be allocated to the region, and some of the projects including in the RLTP, based on this assessment. For the Bay of Plenty region, activities included in the RLTP can claim funding support of up to 51% for activities, including public transport service delivery. The remaining 49% is required to come from local share i.e., Council revenue.

In consideration of the GPS 2024, funding allocations for public transport service delivery activities are likely to be limited. Uncertainty will remain until NZTA release the National Land Transport Plan (NLTP) in September which will detail where funding support has been allocated.

1.2.1    Implications for Council

There is likely to be tighter requirements linked to national funding for the delivery of Council’s public transport function.

There will be a much greater emphasis on public transport user pays (fare recovery) and there may even be some future requirements around this to secure national funding contributions.

The Government’s position on bus decarbonisation is still unclear; the mandated introduction of a zero missions public transport fleet from 2025 may be revisited in the revised Emissions Reduction Plan (ERP2).

The future of some (or all) of the Sustainable Public Transport Framework (SPFT) embedded in legislation by the previous Government is also unclear.

Council may wish to consider the level of alignment between the national direction in the draft GPS and Council’s position on key matters such as:

•    Public transport funding and delivery

•    Transport emissions reduction

•    Road safety

•    The funding balance across activity classes

•    Transport revenue and funding models

Council should continue to take a proactive approach to forming city/regional deals and engaging with the Ministry of Transport and NZTA on these as a potential means of securing future funding.

1.3      Legislative Framework

BOPRC is responsible for funding and contracting public transport services under Part 5 of the Land Transport Management Act 2003 (LTMA).

The overall purpose of the LTMA is to contribute to an effective, efficient, and safe land transport system in the public interest.  Section 115 of the LTMA includes a set of principles that are intended to guide the actions of regional councils in undertaking their public transport functions.

1.4      Alignment with Strategic Framework

A Healthy Environment

We develop and implement regional plans and policy to protect our natural environment.

Safe and Resilient Communities

We work with communities and others to consider long term views of natural hazard risks through our regional plans and policies.

A Vibrant Region

We lead regional transport strategy and system planning, working with others to deliver a safe and reliable public transport system.

The Way We Work

We deliver value to our ratepayers and our customers.

The items outlined in this paper align with the proposed Connected Communities outcome under the proposed framework for the Long Term Plan 2024-34.

Local communities across the region rely on the bus for providing safe and secure access to jobs, schools, essential services, whānau and leisure opportunities.

Bus services and facilities need to be designed around the needs of our customers and communities.

1.4.1    Community Well-beings Assessment

Dominant Well-Beings Affected

¨ Environmental

Low - Positive

¨ Cultural

Low - Positive

þ Social

High - Positive

þ Economic

Low - Positive

Public transport contributes to positive:

a)   Environmental outcomes through reduced transport emissions when people choose to take public transport instead of private vehicle trips. These environmental outcomes are further enhanced when the public transport trip is in a zero-emission vehicle.

b)  Cultural outcomes (refer to the Implications for Māori section of this report).

c)   Social and economic outcomes for our communities. Well planned and effective public transport enables people of all ages and abilities to access a wide range of social and economic activities.

 

 

1.5      Significance

The recommended proposal/decision has been assessed against the criteria and thresholds in Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy, and can be considered:

Medium

The decision is not within existing budgets and does not implement the current long term plan or annual plan.

 

2.        Current transport challenges

2.1.1    Patronage

In November 2023 staff highlighted the green shoots of growth from patronage and we are pleased to report that this growth has continued at 26.1% increase compared to the last financial year to March. It remains true that the perceived increase in private motoring costs (fuel and parking), free / discounted PT fares has raised the profile of our services and their popularity.

Our farebox recovery has increased by 5.2% to 16.7% and whilst improving, is still less than other regions and well short of the 50% fare box recovery ratio applied before 2018. As an example, pre Covid fare box recovery in Auckland, Wellington and Christchurch was between 41% and 55%.

As can been seen by the table below the school services and urban services have contributed the most to the increased demand with approximately 40,000 more commuter trips and 23,000 more school trips per month compared to last year.

Table 1 – Arotake Summary Table

2.1.2    Transport delivery programme

The policy settings indicate the focus on climate change and multimodal outcomes have been de-prioritised. The government now expects fare-box recovery and third-party revenue to be lifted by local government, to fund passenger Transport shortfalls.

The flow on effect from this change is that both central and local government is reviewing its programmes to better reflect these priorities and changes are expected. At a local level this means some projects will be rescoped, PT infrastructure projects may be delayed, and funding for new or expanded services will be highly scrutinised.

In the same way, Regional Council may need to adjust its programme and update Council through the annual plan process on the ramification of these changes. The transport team have identified six key work stratems:

1.   Regional Planning – Preparation of statutory documents Regional Land Transport Plan (RLTP) and Regional Passenger Transport Plan (RPTP) under the Land Transport Management Act (LTMA) 2003.

Aligned

2.   Commercial and Contract Management – A series of activities to review and update procurement approaches, Contract terms and types in preparation for all our PT services contracts expiring over the 4 years.

Aligned

3.   Revenue, funding and Investment planning – Projects that include a review of the fares and pricing of our PT services, Total Mobility and government policy.

Aligned

4.   Service improvement programme – A programme of network “refreshes” across the region prioritised to input into the contract expiry dates, mentioned above.

Will be reviewed for alignment

5.   Business improvement programme – Projects to improve the way we operate targeting time and cost savings, improving the customer experience and improving our performance monitoring and technology updates.

Aligned

6.   New services and product s ­– Council approved projects to introduce new services like On Demand and or products like Travel choice programmes targeting increasing patronage and the Community Transport Forum.

Will be reviewed for alignment

These workstreams were developed and proposed through both the RLTP and LTP process. Whilst there may be some changes the work identified and planned for is well aligned.

Critical path projects

The critical objective for the Transport team in the next 3 years is to successfully manage the contract renewals for our PT services  and establish these services by 2028. Apart from the statutorily required RLTP and RPTP processes these contract renewals are urgently required and no longer be delayed.

Contract renewals present an opportunity to deliver greatest change at the best price, due to competitive tendering and inversely, contract renewals represent an opportunity to de-scope operations, if required.

It also creates an opportunity to reflect any type of policy, customer and or operations change to be included in the request for tender. There are 5 key steps in delivering this workstream:

1.   Understand customers’ needs

2.   Design network based on demand and assess benefits and costs

3.   Establish commercial model to reflect network design

4.   Procure service

5.   Transition into new service arrangement

This programme therefore is dependent on other key interdependent projects outlined in the Transport programme for 2023 – 2024. These have been included the LTP and or RLTP process reflect their priority.

Critical Path projects to complete by 2028:

1.   Customer segmentation work – Underway

2.   Network planning review – Initiated

3.   Regional fares review – not started

4.   Region wide “Network refreshes” including schools – various status

5.   Commercial review of PT contract form – not started

6.   Delivery of the National Ticketing System – under way

7.   PT Service procurement and implementation (7 contract currently)

Influential Projects

1.   Bus decarbonisation study – feasibility complete

2.   Asset Ownership study – not started

3.   Transport Performance Management System – started

Critical to this work stream and influential for the papers in this report are the Regional Fares review and the planned network refreshes.

Fares review

The 2019 Bay of Plenty Regional Public Transport Plan (RPTP) identified the need for a bus fare review. This was further reiterated in the 2021-2031 Bay of Plenty Regional Land Transport Plan (RPTP).

This work was originally programmed to be completed in 2020. Work on this review has not previously been progressed due to:

•    Shifting priorities both during and post the COVID-19 pandemic;

•    Poor quality public transport data due to decreased ridership; and

•    Internal resource availability to deliver the work.

The scope for this review is as follows:

•    Production of a current state summary

•    Identification of potential fare structures/models to support the future vision of the PT network

•    Consideration of how different structures/products/concessions might:

§ Influence travel behaviour, ridership and modal shift to PT

§ Impact farebox recovery/subsidy requirements

•    Consider what changes could be implemented with BOPRC’s current ticketing technology vs the need for new/enhanced functionality

Whilst the ultimate output of this work would be a technical report and a recommendation to Council, it is envisaged that early engagement would be undertaken through Councillor workshops and a community consultation phase.

Network refreshes/planning

Network refreshes provide opportunity for development, expansion and finetuning of the networks. Included in the LTP Funds will provide planning, business cases and implementation for Tauranga, Rotorua, Western and Eastern Bay of Plenty and provide the design basis for the network and consequently the service required for the reviewed.

Risks and uncertainties

However in the Public Transport and Infrastructure (PTS&I) business case the timing for any infrastructure recommendations may be delayed and need to be assessed against new funding criteria. The project team is currently looking at the recommendations and aligning them to the new GPS.

In addition for the Western Bay of Plenty, staff have been working through the Transport system plan (TSP) and Urban Form and Transport Initiative (UFTI)  frameworks to deliver a step change in level of service from a hub and spoke model to a through routing service. This has been further underpinned by the work completed in the PTS&I.

In the new GPS context its increasingly uncertain the business case would attract funding for the step change and other infrastructure improvements in the next 3 years. step-change. This will have implications for the operation of the service and potentially the new network design will not be included as part of the upcoming PT contract renewals.

As the RLTP and Business cases progress staff will monitor and report this work back to Council.

2.1.3    Increasing costs of operating

As Council will be aware operational expenses have increased and this is expected to continue. Councillors will recall, two of most expensive elements of running a bus operation are labour and fuel, both of which have seen substantial inflation. The Waka Kotahi PT cost index indicates almost a 20% increase since September 2018 as can be seen by the chart below. Our current Public Transport Operating Model (PTOM) contracts have an inflation element, requiring us to cover these increases.

As staff prepare to renew the contract there is a significant risk that the tender box prices will reflect a ‘reset’ on operation costs and be in general more expensive. It is difficult to predict the scale of this increase and Staff through the process will keep Council informed as we know more.

Table 2: Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency diesel bus public transport indexes to Dec23

3.        Key Decisions

3.1      Community Connect Funding

3.1.1    Summary

Full analysis of this item is contained in the attached Transportation – Fares and Revenue – Government withdrawal of Community Connect funding Issues and Options paper attached to this report.

Launched in 2023, Community Connect was the previous government’s programme aimed to provide transport equity for low-income earners and beneficiaries through a public transport fare concession, New Zealand wide.

On 9 June 2023, Council extended its own free fare policy to align with this announcement. Government has now withdrawn the Community Connect subsidies in alignment with its GPS 2024 strategy. The deadline for funding withdrawal is 30 April 2024.

3.1.2    Options

The Public Transport Committee (PTC) have considered the implications of the government funding withdrawal. Subsequently, the PTC resolved to recommended Option 2. The three proposed fare structures are outlined in the table 1, below.

Table 1: Fare structure options

Group 

Option 1  

Option 2 (Recommended)

Option 3

Age 0 - 5 

Free 

Free 

Free

Age 6 – 12 

Free (at all times) 

Free (at peak) 

Full Price

Age 13 – 18 

Free (at all times)

Free (at peak) 

Full Price

Age 19 - 24 

Half Price (at all times) 

Full Price 

Full Price

Age 25+

Full Price

Full Price

Full Price

Age 65+

Discount (free off-peak)

Discount (free off-peak)

Discount (free off-peak)

Super Gold Card Holder

Free after 9am

Free after 9am

Free after 9am

Annual financial impact 

$1.9m

$0.8m

($0.9m)

3.2      Tertiary Services

3.2.1    Summary

Full analysis of this item is contained in the attached Transportation – Regional Tertiary Commuter services Issues and Options paper attached to this report.

Since 2020, Bay of Plenty Regional Council (BOPRC) has operated fare free tertiary commuter services for tertiary students. The commencement of these services was prompted by a submission received from Murupara Area School as part of the Bay of Plenty Regional Council’s 2019/2020 Annual Plan consultation. They were set up to provide increased accessibility for students attending institutes to remove barriers to tertiary learning. The five tertiary commuter services currently in operation include:

1.   Whakatāne to Tauranga (Route 101);

2.   Rotorua to Tauranga (Route 102);

3.   Katikati to Tauranga (Route 103);

4.   Murupara to Rotorua (Route 104); and

5.   Tauranga to Rotorua (Route 105).

The services currently operate under an agreed funding model between Council and two tertiary institutions, Toi Ohomai Institute of Technology (Toi Ohomai) and The University of Waikato (UoW).

UoW have proposed a change to the agreed funding model. They are seeking consistency with the Waikato region’s approach that has tertiary students paying subsidised fares (50%).  This would see the introduction of fares for tertiary students in the Bay of Plenty to be consistent with the current BOPRC urban networks i.e., 60% of the adult fare. Toi Ohomai is not seeking a change to the co-funding model but acknowledge that it may be appropriate that students contribut e towards their fares.

If implemented, the proposed change would increase the services’ fare box recovery ratio and reduce the net amount that BOPRC, Toi Ohomai and UoW presently contribute under the existing funding model. However, the introduction of fares for tertiary students would represent a shift from the original intent of providing a free and direct service.

3.2.2    Options

Staff have identified two options in response to the identified issues.

Option 1:

·      Retain services with existing free fares.

·      This option is currently budgeted in the draft LTP 2024-34; there is no additional financial impact for Council.

Option 2 (recommended):

·      Retain services and introduce tertiary student fares.

·      The tertiary student fare would be consistent with that on the current BOPRC urban networks i.e., 60% of the adult fare.

·      The adult one-way fare is $5 for Routes 101, 102, 104 and 105. The outlier is the Katikati-Tauranga service (Route 103) with a one-way fare at $8.20. The proposed 60% of adult fare equates to a $3 one-way fare for all routes, except the Katikati-Tauranga service which becomes $4.92 per one-way fare.

Below is an estimate of the additional revenue from the service if fares are introduced for tertiary students at 60% of present adult fare. It also shows how the additional revenue would be apportioned, reducing the funding contributions from Council and tertiary providers.

·      BOPRC share                $12k

·      UOW share                   $ 4k

·      Toi Ohomai share        $ 8k

     Total          $24k

3.3      Increase to School Services

3.3.1    Summary

Full analysis of this item is contained in the attached Transportation – Tauranga School Bus Services funding Issues and Options paper attached to this report.

Bay of Plenty Regional Council contracts bus operators to run dedicated school bus services across Tauranga. These services are stand-alone, separate to the urban network.

With the commencement of the 2024 school year the Transport team have seen a significant increase in demand for extra dedicated school bus services across Tauranga.

In particular, school buses that service nine schools are regularly full, leading to students unable to board. Buses being filled to the extent that loading is unsafe. This has also been directly observed by staff.

Following an investigation, staff believe that an extra 11 dedicated school trips are required, to support nine schools. The cost for these services is $446k per annum and is currently unbudgeted.

Approval is sought to secure extra services to meet the demand.

3.3.2    Options

Option 1:

·      Do nothing. Council does not provide additional dedicated school services where increased demand exceeds existing capacity.

·      There is no financial impact for Council from this option.

Option 2 (recommended):

·      That Council allocates funding to provide an additional 11 daily dedicated school bus trips, servicing nine schools. 

·      The costs for procuring extra dedicated school services are currently not budgeted in the draft LTP 2024-2034. Current reserve balances are insufficient to fund the financial implications associated with this decision.

·      it is proposed that the extra services would begin at the commencement of the new financial year (1st July) and would have a net cost to council of $423k in the 2024/25 financial year being $446k increase in operating costs less $23k subsidy revenue.

·      School patronage demand generally reduces during the year and staff anticipate the possibility of reducing the use of the additional buses. This may reduce costs outlined above.

4.        Considerations

4.1      Risks and Mitigations

The financial implications of introducing any of the options have been noted above and are detailed further in the three attached Issues and Options papers. The papers also include consideration of advantages and disadvantages to support understanding risk and associated mitigations.

Please refer to the relevant analysis in the options paper attached.

4.2      Climate Change

The provision of public transport services is inherently supportive of climate change mitigation. However, a level of risk remains with the options provided in the attached Issues and Options papers particularly with respect to increasing fare prices which may decrease patronage. This poses a risk from a climate change perspective as it may de-incentivise the use of public transport and make alternative modes such as private vehicles – that are generally higher emitting – more attractive. 

To the contrary, the proposals to allocate further funding support for School Bus Services in Tauranga is largely positive shift in the face of climate change. Additional school buses support the movement of education aged children in an efficient manner while promoting positive behavioural patterns for users.

Mitigation

Adaptation

Reduce GHG emissions

Produce GHG emissions

Sequester carbon

Anticipate climate change impacts

Respond to climate change impacts

 

4.3      Implications for Māori

Increasing fare pricing, as recommended for in the Community Connect and Tertiary Service papers, may negatively impact accessibility issues for Māori. In contrast, increasing the provision of public transport services via additional School Services, will provide better opportunities for Māori to access education in certain areas within Tauranga.

4.4      Community Engagement

Adobe Systems

CONSULT

Whakauiuia

To obtain input or feedback from affected communities about our analysis, alternatives, and /or proposed decisions.

 

Community engagement, through the Long Term Plan consultation process included a focus on public transport fares, however, this did not cover specific items outlined in the attached Options and Issues Papers. Each is considered as follows:

·      Community Connect Funding: full consultation is likely to progress when the Regional Fares Review policy development is undertaken – likely to be late 2024. The changes recommended in the Community Connect paper would be incorporated into the consultation process.

·      Tertiary Services: as above – any changes to fare structures for tertiary services would be encompassed within the Regional Fares Review work.

·      Increasing School Bus Services: consultation has largely occurred on this matter, schools and communities affected by the lack of services have been lobbying Regional Council to increase support, as outlined by the recommended option.

4.5      Financial Implications

 

The financial implications of each of the proposals, and their options, are laid out in the three Issues and Options Papers, attached.

5.        Next Steps

At the conclusion of deliberations, staff will incorporate all direction in the draft Long Term Plan 2024-2034. The draft Long Term Plan 2024-2034 will then undergo a final audit stage with Audit New Zealand prior to it being presented to Council for adoption on 26 June on 2024.

Attachments

Attachment 1 - Community Connect - Additional Information

Attachment 2 - Tauranga School Bus Services - Additional Informaiton

Attachment 3 - Tertiary Commuter Services - Additional Information  

 


Regional Council                                                                                                          28 May 2024

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Report To:

Regional Council

Meeting Date:

28 May 2024

Report Writer:

Dean Howie, Programme Manager - Regional Economic Development and Olive McVicker, Corporate Performance Team Lead

Report Authoriser:

Namouta Poutasi, General Manager, Strategy and Science

Purpose:

To obtain Council’s direction for the review of the Waste Management Strategy

 

 

Sustainable Development - Waste Management

 

Executive Summary

Waste management and enabling a circular economy received five submissions to the LTP.  Four submissions were from Territorial Authorities (TAs) and one submission from an individual.  The TAs requested Council play a more active role in leading and coordinating activities across the region – including allocating funding to review the Regional Waste Strategy and establishing a regional waste management coordination role.

These requests have been evaluated through the Issues and Options paper in Attachment 1.

 

Recommendations

That the Regional Council:

1        Receives the report, Sustainable Development - Waste Management;

2        That Council directs that $50, 000 pa ($500,000 over 10 years) is budgeted in the Long Term Plan 2024 and that council take a lead role in the refresh and implementation of the regional waste strategy, subject to funding received from TLA’s;

3        Notes that a two year fixed term role will be established to coordinate the delivery of the strategy at a cost of $288,000 subject to external funding cost recovery;

4        Confirms the decision has a medium level of significance as determined by the Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy. Council has identified and assessed different options and considered community views as part of making the decision, in proportion to the level of significance.

 

1.        Introduction

1.1      Background

Council has various roles in Waste Management over the years. 

In relation to regional coordination, education, facilitation, collaboration and support services activities - Council led the development of the Bay of Plenty Waste and Resource Efficiency Strategy 2013 – 2023.  This strategy established the Waste Resource Advisory Group (WRAG) which administered $50,000 per annum contestable waste minimisation fund. 

In response to the pandemic in 2020 Council decided to focus more on core business and let Territorial Authorities (TA’s) focus on waste minimisation.  The WRAG fund was no longer distributed, and the Regional Waste Strategy has been dormant since this time.  Council has remained an active participant in the Central North Island Waste Liaison Group (CNIWLG)

The Mayoral Forum resolved in June 2022 that BOPRC would join with the regions TAs to develop a new Regional Waste Strategy.  This work was initiated by Tauranga City Council (TCC) but was put on hold while TCC led a review of BOP waste infrastructure.  This report is not yet completed.

In April 2024 CNIWLG has proposed that a uniform Waste Strategy could be developed to cover the central North Island.  This project would be jointly led by Waikato Regional Council and BOPRC, within input from all TAs in the area.  TCC would be the lead TA for the Bay of Plenty.

Work still continues on the following Regional waste activities:

·      Compliance - 24 hour pollution hotline.  Monitoring and enforcement of plan and consent conditions.  Industrial site audits and pollution prevention programmes

·      Consent processing – authorising discharges to water/land/air from fill operations in accordance with provisions in Regional Plans and the RMA.

1.2      Legislative Framework

The Waste Minimisation Act 2008 puts responsibility on local government (TAs) to promote effective and efficient waste management and minimisation within their districts.  This act does not assign a specific role to regional councils in waste management, so it is not a required Regional Council function under this Act.  Most regional councils accept having a role based on responsibilities under the Local Government Act 2002, the New Zealand Waste Strategy 2023 and under s30 of the RMA (Functions of Regional Councils):

-     To achieve integrated management of the region’s natural and physical resources and

-     To regulate discharge of contaminants into the environment.

1.3      Alignment with Strategic Framework

 

A Healthy Environment

 

Freshwater for Life

 

Safe and Resilient Communities

 

A Vibrant Region

We invest appropriately in infrastructure to support sustainable development.

The Way We Work

 

 

1.3.1    Community Well-beings Assessment

Dominant Well-Beings Affected

þ Environmental

 

¨ Cultural

 

¨ Social

 

¨ Economic

 

 

 

1.4      Significance

The recommended proposal/decision has been assessed against the criteria and thresholds in Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy, and can be considered:

Medium

The decision is not within existing budgets and does not implement the current long term plan or annual plan.

The financial costs and implications of the decision are not yet known or provided for.

 

2.        Waste Management

Four TAs within the region have requested that Council allocates funding to review the Regional Waste Strategy.  The submissions also requested Council include provision for a contribution to regional waste infrastructure (covered in a separate paper).

These requests have been evaluated through the Issues and Options paper in Attachment 1.

·      Option 1 –Council provides an additional $50k per annum funding and dedicated staff resource (with full cost recovery) to take a lead role in the refresh and implementation of the regional waste strategy, subject to funding received from Territorial Authorities.

·      Option 2 – Council maintains the status quo and supports regional waste minimisation through existing activity budgets (no funding impact) and staff time, where capacity allows and initiatives are aligned to core activities.

 

3.        Considerations

3.1      Risks and Mitigations

There are no significant risks associated with this matter/subject/project/initiative.

3.2      Climate Change

The matters addressed in this report are of a procedural nature and there is no need to consider climate change impacts.

3.3      Implications for Māori

Consultation was completed for the Council’s Long Term Plan 2024-2034.  The review of the current Waste Management Strategy will provide the opportunity for input from Maori.

3.4      Community Engagement

Please refer to the relevant analysis in the options paper attached.

3.5      Financial Implications

It is estimated a total of an additional $50,000 per annum is required over the 10 years of the LTP which would be funded by a 0.1% increase in General rates. 

There are no cost implications for the two year fixed term role to coordinate delivery.  The estimated cost over two years is $288,000 with external funding full cost recovery.

Full details are provided in the attached issues and options paper.

4.        Next Steps

The LTP will be updated to reflect the direction received from Council.

Attachments

Attachment 1 - Issues and Options_Waste minimisation and enabling a circular economy_v5  

 


Regional Council                                                                                                          28 May 2024

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Report To:

Regional Council

Meeting Date:

28 May 2024

Report Writer:

Herewini Simpson, Kaihautu (Te Amorangi Lead) and Olive McVicker, Corporate Performance Team Lead

Report Authoriser:

Kataraina O'Brien, General Manager, Strategic Engagement

Purpose:

To obtain Council direction for the implementation of the Te Ara Poutama outcome as a result of community consultation

 

 

Community Outcome - Te Ara Poutama, The Pursuit of Excellence

 

Executive Summary

The Te Ara Poutama, Pursuit of Excellence is a new outcome in the strategic framework for the Long Term Plan 2024-2034 (LTP).  There was strong support expressed for Te Ara Poutama via LTP consultation, through written submissions and oral presentations. 

The submitters emphasised the need to build relationships and work in partnership to achieve the desired outcomes for our environment.  Requests for support were wide and varied and included financial support, continuation of existing services and in-kind contributions.

We recognise the current fiscal constraints and have based recommendations on implementing essential core mahi.

This report is seeking:

·      The establishment of a Māori Initiatives Fund to accommodate the spectrum of requests that align with LTP Outcomes;

·      A Co-Governance budget to enable excellence in achieving mutually beneficial outcomes via established co-governance and/or co-management forums;

·      An increase to the existing Hapū-Iwi Management Plan Fund, accommodating the next generation of plans to inform Council operations, planning and policy;

·      Development of organisational policies for:

a)   Māori Initiatives Fund

b)  Regional Co-governance Secretariat Fund

c)   Treaty of Waitangi/Te Tiriti

d)  Social Procurement

 

Recommendations

That the Regional Council:

1        Receives the report, Community Outcome - Te Ara Poutama, The Pursuit of Excellence;

2        Approves the establishment of a Māori Initiatives Fund (MIF) and allocates funding of $200,000 per annum for years 1-3 of the 2024/2034 LTP; 

3        Approves the development of a MIF Policy in year 1 of the 2024-2034 LTP; the MIF Policy is to be reviewed in year 3 of the 2024/2034 LTP;

4        Approves a Regional Co-Governance Secretariat Fund (RCSF) and allocates $200,000 per annum for years 1-3 of the 2024/2034 LTP; the RCSF is reviewable in year 3 of the 2024/2034 LTP;

5        Approves the development of a RCSF Policy reviewable in year 3 of the 2024/2034 LTP;

6        Approves an increase to the Iwi/Hapū Management Plan budget from $70,000 to $140,000 per annum;

7        Approves the development of a Treaty of Waitangi/Te Tiriti Policy;

8        Approves the development of a Social Procurement Policy;

9        Confirms the decision has a medium level of significance as determined by the Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy. Council has identified and assessed different options and considered community views as part of making the decision, in proportion to the level of significance.

 

1.        Introduction

There were a total of 79 submissions from Maori (either individuals or representing an organisation).

The key themes being articulated in the submissions were support for:

·      Te Ara Poutama and its associated goals (goals 15, 16, 17 & 18)

·      Capacity and Capability (Taiao hubs, secondments, shared services et)

·      Relationship protocols (including Mana Whakahono a Rohe agreements)

·      Partnerships

·      Treaty of Waitangi position statement

·      Te Reo Māori in Council documents

·      Incorporation of Mātauranga Māori

·      Procurement opportunities

·      Continuation of existing funding streams

The majority of submitters support the work we do, the way we work and the strategic goals that focus on mutually beneficial outcomes for the community and the Taiao.  Submitters who presented at the recent LTP hearings, were engaged, professional and passionate.

There was overwhelming support for Te Ara Poutama and its associated goals.  The goals capture the important mahi we are doing, while allowing scope to grow, enhance and innovate. 

Te Ara Poutama goals are:

·      Goal 15 : Supporting enhanced Māori participation in operational activities, and progressing new opportunities where they arise within existing operations;

·      Goal 16: Supporting Māori capacity and capability building to empower proactive relationships;

·      Goal 17: Ensuring an equitable approach to the four wellbeing’s and deliver of community outcomes;

·      Goal 18: Partner with Māori to enhance delivery and share decision-making;

1.1      Legislative Framework

Council is required to have a Long Term Plan under section 93 of the Local Government Act 2002 (LGA).  Schedule 10 of the LGA also requires Council to provide financial forecast statements.

Specific provisions for Māori in the Local Government Act include: 

·      Establishing and maintaining processes to provide opportunities for Māori to contribute to decision-making processes (section 81(1)(a));

 

·      Considering ways in which it may foster the development of Māori capacity to contribute to the decision-making processes (section 81(1)(b);

 

·      Providing relevant information to Māori (section 81(1)(c);

 

·      Taking into account the relationship of Māori and their culture and traditions with their ancestral land, water, sites, wāhi tapu, valued flora and fauna and other taonga (section 77(1)(c); and

 

1.2      Alignment with Strategic Framework

 

A Healthy Environment

 

Freshwater for Life

 

Safe and Resilient Communities

 

A Vibrant Region

We work with and connect the right people to create a prosperous region and economy.

The Way We Work

 

 

Council has reviewed and proposed a new strategic framework/direction including new community outcomes for the LTP.  If council adopts the new strategic direction, this will replace the current Community Outcomes from 1 July 2024.

1.2.1    Community Well-beings Assessment

Dominant Well-Beings Affected

þ Environmental

 

þ Cultural

 

þ Social

 

¨ Economic

 

 

 

1.3      Significance

The recommended proposal/decision has been assessed against the criteria and thresholds in Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy, and can be considered:

Medium

The decision is not within existing budgets and does not implement the current long term plan or annual plan.

The financial costs and implications of the decision are not yet known or provided for.

 

2.        Te Ara Poutama, The Pursuit of Excellence

Through consultation, submissions and presentations, there was strong support for this new outcome and supporting goals.  Opportunities were identified during the consultation period to embed this outcome.  This included various arrangements to build capacity and capability.

A summary of funding requests is included in the table below:

Description

Requested 

Recommended

Capability & Capacity Initiatives (estimate)

400,000

200,000

Iwi Management Plans

70,000

70,000

Co-Governance Support

224,000

200,000

Specified LTP Requests

467,000

0

TOTAL

1,161,000

470,000

less existing budget from other activity areas

 

-200,000

New budget required

 

270,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Currently the activity Te Pae Tawhiti (Maori capability and capacity building) has no budget allocation to accommodate the requests received. 

 

Te Ara Poutama would require a strategy/implementation plan, including a process to monitor and report progress.

 

An approach as to how council can respond to these requests and continue to build relationships is identified below.

2.1      Proposed Māori Initiatives Fund (MIF)

There were a number of submissions requesting support to build partnerships via formal and informal agreements, enhance and sustainably grow capacity, improve technical capability and enable proactive working relationships with Council.  The feedback was wide and varied, but not unexpected given the unique dynamic of the region.

It is proposed to establish a Māori Initiatives Fund (MIF) where proposals can be assessed on a case-by-case basis with the final decision on budget allocation being endorsed by Komiti Māori.  The MIF similar to the Community Initiatives Fund (CIF) and the Volunteers Fund, would have a policy to ensure clarity of its purpose and rigour in funding decisions to ensure an equitable approach.

Staff recommend:

a)   a budget allocation of $200,000 per annum (quantum to align with the CIF) reviewable in year 3 of the 2024/2034 LTP

b)  development of a MIF Policy to guide funding allocations

2.2      Regional Co-Governance Secretariat Fund (RCSF)

We received submissions from the leaders of three established co-governance forums (Te Maru o Kaituna, Rangitāiki River Forum and the Tarawera Awa Restoration Group) seeking funding to continue the secretariat services that Council funded through its last LTP.  Council currently administers several forums, with two more Treaty settlements expected (Te Whakatōhea and Te Whānau a Apanui) to be legislated within 12 months.

Co-governance arrangements are one of the key mechanisms which seek to recognise the relationship of tangata whenua with the natural environment.  These arrangements can emerge from redress mechanisms as part of Treaty of Waitangi settlements, although others do exist.  Council is party to four (five from mid 2025) Treaty settlement based statutory partnership arrangements, and separately, two non-statutory arrangements.

At the last LTP Council agreed to a Co-Governance secretariat to enable improved Iwi contributions. Māori capacity and capability is extremely limited for Iwi Authorities, impacting on respective members ability to equally participate in Forum business.  Iwi have expressed their appreciation for this arrangement and see immense value in its continuation.

Staff propose that the funding pool is a shared resource for Co-Governance Forums and allocated on a case by case basis.  We note that some Treaty Co-Governance Forums receive financial contributions from the Crown for specific purposes.  The financial contributions are held by the administering authority. 

A RSF policy would be developed to guide funding allocations.

Staff recommend:

a)   A budget allocation of $200,000 per annum, reviewable in year 3 of the 2024/2034 LTP

b)  Development of a RSF Policy to guide funding allocations

2.3      Iwi/Hapū Management Plans

At the hearings it was recognised that a number of iwi/hapū management plans need to be reviewed.  These plans provide a mechanism by which tangata whenua interests can be considered and incorporated into Council operations and decision making processes.  Council is legally required to take these plans into account, and they are regularly used to inform Councils functions and operations.  The national reforms and increasing environmental issues have seen continued growth in the demand for Iwi Management Plan support.

This current budget is $70,000 and it is proposed that this budget is increased to $140,000.  The increase is to recognise the opportunity to evolve existing and new plans, accommodating emerging issues and providing scope for innovation. These plans can potentially be conduits for relationship agreements and connecting into partnership spaces.

The Iwi/Hapū Plan annual budget increased from $30,000 to $50,000 in 2009.  In 2012 Council improved an additional budget of $20,000 increasing the budget to $70,000 per annum.  No additional budget has been requested since 2012.

 

Staff recommend:

a)   An increase of $70,000 to the existing Hapū/Iwi Resource Management Plan Fund, taking the fund to $140,000 per annum

2.4      Treaty of Waitangi Policy/Statement

A number of submitters felt strongly that Council should confirm its commitment to the Treaty of Waitangi through a Treaty/Te Tiriti statement. A policy prepared by staff and approved by Komiti Māori and Council, would enhance relationships and help to build trust and confidence thereby enabling enduring and enhanced working relationships. 

Staff recommend:

a)   The development of a Treaty of Waitangi Policy/Statement

2.5      Social Procurement

Several submitters sought confirmation that Council services provided equitable procurement opportunities for suppliers and support agencies.  The development of a Procurement Policy provides an opportunity to review, develop and enhance existing processes and procedures.

Staff recommend:

a)   The development of a social procurement policy

2.6      Other Specified LTP Requests

The table below outlines further funding requests received within this activity area.

Specified Requests - Te Pae Tawhiti Activity Area

Description

Yr1

Yr2

Yr3

Te Tokotoru a Manawakotokoto - Ngati Pikiao, Ngati Rongomai, Ngati Makino

Enviro Hub

260,000

260,000

260,000

Pirirākau Incorporated Society

Relationship Accord

100,000

100,000

100,000

Ngāitai Iwi Authority

Secondment

107,000

 

 

 TOTAL

 

467,000

360,000

360,000

Staff have carried out an initial assessment of the funding requests to identify alignment with key outcomes/activity areas and opportunities to address specific requests within existing budgets.  It is recommended these matters be further explored through existing operations.

Te Tokotoru a Manawakotokoto

Seeking $260k per year to establish an iwi Enviro Hub. Enviro Hubs are an initiative Councils have recently piloted and are continuing to explore. Councils Te Ara Poutama framework / implementation plan will be developed in Year 1, and provide a co-ordinated approach to Taiao Hubs and like initiatives.

Proposal requires further scoping and development across a number of areas before any specific commitment can be recommended. Staff will continue to work alongside this iwi collective on this, with a view to potential support via allocated operational funding (see above) at a later-stage.

Pirirakau Incorporated Society

Seeking $100k per year to develop a Relationship Accord, focussed on priority areas including Hapu Management Plan, Climate Change, Emergency Mgmt, Shared Capability, Procurement. 

Relationship agreements and partnership opportunities in existing areas of operation are a key goal within Te Ara Poutama. Development of a relationship agreement can be accommodated within existing operations. The extent of support for any component matters, requires further assessment by the relevant Activity area. 

Ngaitai Iwi Authority

Requested BOPRC second a staff member (for up to one year) to Ngāitai to coordinate and develop a relationship plan between the iwi and relevant council teams (Rivers & Drainage, consents, planning, and science).  We have estimated an approximate figure of $107k as the one off cost of this initiative.

          Council has recently developed a matrix to aid the assessment of secondment opportunities, pursuant to which there are a range of options to support these initiatives. We consider this proposed secondment should be further explored through that process.

3.        Considerations

3.1      Risks and Mitigations

The fiscal limitations of Council are a key consideration when prioritising funding decisions.  Council will not be able to fund all requests for financial support which poses a risk to relationships.  Mitigating and managing expectations will need to carefully navigated. Staff will seek ways to provide support in-kind, work within existing budgets and actively seek co-funding opportunities.

Climate Change

The matters addressed in this report are of a procedural nature and there is no need to consider climate change impacts.

 

3.2      Implications for Māori

The matters raised in this paper are in response to the significant consultation that was undertaken with Māori as part of the LTP process.  The feedback received through the submissions and the hearings identified key themes which are being addressed through this paper.

It was evident in the submissions and hearings process the desire of iwi/hapu groups to build relationships with council and to work in partnership.  The landscape is changing as previous investment in iwi initiatives has been positive and they are keen to build on this. 

The care of the environment was a priority for many and a number of groups were keen to work with council to restore the taiao.

Iwi-Māori are proactively seeking to be involved in Council business at different levels.  While some are seeking specific funding, others are asking for support in kind, retaining BAU and enhancing relationships through formal and informal arrangements. 

Relevant staff will be continually looking for opportunities to strengthen working relationships with tangata whenua and will need to prioritise mahi across the region to achieve impactful outcomes.

3.3      Community Engagement

Significant engagement was completed across the region as part of the LTP consultation process.  This paper is to identify Councils response to the community engagement that was undertaken.

 

3.4      Financial Implications

This paper is requesting a further $270,000 of which $200,000 allocated to the proposed Māori Initiatives Fund and a $70,000 increase to the current budget for the Iwi/Hapū Management Plans.  Secretariat funding of $200,000 per annum to come from existing activity budgets.

4.        Next Steps

The draft LTP budget and work programmes will be updated to reflect decisions made by Council.

Attachments

Attachment 1 - Issues Options Paper  Te Pae Tawhiti PDF  

 


Regional Council                                                                                                          28 May 2024

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Report To:

Regional Council

Meeting Date:

28 May 2024

Report Writer:

Graeme Howard, Corporate Planning Lead; Mark Le Comte, Principal Advisor, Finance; Kerry Gosling, Senior Community Engagement Advisor and Anna Dawson, Land Management Officer

Report Authoriser:

Kataraina O'Brien, General Manager, Strategic Engagement

Purpose:

To gain Council direction on external funding requests that have been received through the Long Term Plan.

 

 

Connected Communities - Community Funding

 

Executive Summary

Through the Long Term Plan staff have identified 41 requests from external organisations for operational funding and 7 requests for capital Funding. 

A number of funding requests align to individual activity areas and will be addressed through those activity areas, within exiting budgets.

Given the fiscal environment and the council focus on council core business, staff recommendations are to decline or scale back most requests for funding. 

Direction is sought from Council on allocating funding based on requests that relate to the following areas:

Operational Funding

·           Community Initiatives Fund Applications

·           Regional Safety and Rescue Services Funding

·           Volunteer Initiatives Fund – Environmental Volunteering Support

A summary of Capital/Infrastructure funding requests is also included in this report.

 

Recommendations

That the Regional Council:

1        Receives the report, Connected Communities - Community Funding;

2        Notes the staff recommendations in the table below for allocating funding to Community Initiatives Fund applications, which has budgeted funding of $200,000 per annum;

 

Community Initiatives Fund applications summary - LTP 2024

Submission #

Project Title

Funding requested ($)

Staff recommendation ($)

2024/25

2025/26

2026/27

2024/25

2025/26

2026/27

10713

Ngā Uri Māui Trust

50,588

40,000

40,000

50,000

40,000

40,000

10516

Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Whakaue ki Maketū*

162,650

162,650

162,650

50,000

50,000

50,000

Application

 attached

Youth SAR

8,000

8,000

8,000

8,000

8,000

8,000

Application

 attached

Tauranga Moana Biosecurity Capital (TMBC)

100,000

100,000

100,000

50,000

50,000

50,000

10349

Sustainable Bay of Plenty Charitable Trust

50,000

50,000

50,000

0

0

0

10571

Rotorua X

9,999

7,499

4,999

0

0

0

10165

Western Bay of Plenty Heritage Trust (Western Bay Museum)

32,500

40,000

25,000

0

0

0

10563

REKA Charitable Trust

70,000

0

0

0

0

0

9843

The Stand Tall Community Trust

25,000

25,000

25,000

0

0

0

10464

SPCA

28,794

28,794

28,794

0

0

0

10477

Aquatic Survival Skills Trust

30,000

40,000

50,000

0

0

0

10552

The Preserving Local History and Educational Trust (Te Pupuri I Nga Hitori o Te Rohe Trust)

7,000

7,000

7,000

0

0

0

 

Total

574,531

508,943

501,443

158,000

148,000

148,000

Currently Budgeted in draft LTP

200,000

200,000

200,000

200,000

200,000

200,000

Balance

-374,531

-308,943

-301,443

42,000

52,000

52,000

 

3        Notes that Council can decide to change the allocations set out in recommendation 2 above, including allocating the remaining CIF budget;

4        Directs staff to incorporate into the draft Long Term Plan for Adoption, Council direction on funding for the following Community Initiatives Fund applications, noting the total budgeted funding $200,000 per annum.

(a)  Ngā Uri Māui Trust

(b)  Rotorua X

(c)  Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Whakaue ki Maketu

(d)  Sustainable Bay of Plenty Charitable Trust

(e)  Youth SAR (transferred From RSRS Fund)

(f)   Tauranga Moana Biosecurity Capital (TMBC)

(g)  Western Bay of Plenty Heritage Trust (Western Bay Museum)

(h)  REKA Charitable Trust

(i)   The Stand Tall Community Trust

(j)   Royal New Zealand Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (SPCA)

(k)  Aquatic Survival Skills Trust

(l)   The Preserving Local History and Educational Trust (Te Pupuri I Nga Hitori o Te Rohe Trust)

5        Directs staff to implement one of the two following options relating to the level of funding allocated to Regional Safety and Rescue Services budget, funded by the Regional Safety and Rescue Services Targeted Rate, in the draft Long Term Plan budget:

(a)  Status Quo: No change to the current RSRS budget of $400,000 per annum as set out in the draft LTP 2024-2034 for consultation.

(b)  Increase the targeted rate funded RSRS budget by an amount directed by Council, noting that the budget increase will be referred to CDEMG for allocation, along with any guidance from Council.

6        Notes the staff recommendations in the table below for supporting environmental volunteering through the Volunteer Initiatives Fund, which has budgeted funding of $285,000 per annum. 

 

Volunteer Initiatives Fund (VIF) summary - LTP 2024

Submission #

Project Title

Funding requested ($)

Staff recommendation ($)

2024/25

2025/26

2026/27

2024/25

2025/26

2026/27

10198

Bay Conservation Alliance

85,000

120,000

120,000

85,000

120,000

120,000

9948

Envirohub

150,000

150,000

150,000

50,000

50,000

50,000

10282

Outflow Trust

151,616

151,616

151,616

30,000

30,000

30,000

10248

Sea Cleaners Trust

50,000

50,000

50,000

50,000

50,000

50,000

 

Care Group Coordinator - Contractor

60,000

60,000

60,000

60,000

60,000

60,000

Total

496,616

531,616

531,616

275,000

310,000

310,000

Currently Budgeted in draft LTP

285,000

285,000

285,000

285,000

285,000

285,000

Balance

-211,616

-246,616

-246,616

10,000

-25,000

-25,000

7        Directs staff to incorporate into the Draft Long Term Plan for Adoption, Council direction on funding for the following projects involving volunteers.

(a)  Bay Conservation Alliance

(b)  Envirohub

(c)  Sea Cleaners Trust

(d)  Outflow Trust

8        Directs staff to develop a Water Quality Funding Support Policy through the Strategy and Policy Committee to be approved by Council.

9        Decides that all new wastewater funding support is on hold until the Water Quality Funding Support Policy is approved by Council.

10      Confirms the annual budget of $250,000 for the Environmental Enhancement Fund.

11      Confirms the decision has a medium level of significance as determined by the Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy. Council has identified and assessed different options and considered community views as part of making the decision, in proportion to the level of significance.

 

1.        Introduction

Council received a large number of funding requests from Community Groups, Trusts, Māori organisations, councils and others through consultation on the draft Long Term Plan 2024-2034 (draft LTP). The total funding applied for considerably exceeds the funding available in the draft LTP budget. 

Operational funding requests have been reviewed to identify the appropriate activity area for funding and requests have been grouped into the following categories:

·      Community Initiatives Fund (CIF) – CIF has an annual budget of $200,000 per annum in the draft Long Term Plan 2024-2034.

·      Regional Safety and Recue Services – one funding request received specifically relates to this Target Rated fund. 

·      Environmental Volunteering Support – Funding within the Catchments Activity to support environmental volunteering.

·      Te Ara Poutama – Capability and Capacity and Secretariat support – funding requests relating to these themes identified through LTP submissions are considered through issues and options in the Te Ara Poutama paper included in this deliberations pack. 

·      Other – these are funding requests across a range of activity areas including; Catchments, Regional Development, Spatial Planning, Transport. These funding requests have been considered through relevant Council activity budgets.

A summary of all funding requests is included as Attachment 1.

Using these categories, the operational funding requests have been allocated as per the diagram below.

In addition, requests for Capital/Infrastructure funding are considered under section 2.5 of this report.

1.1      Legislative Framework

Council does not have any legislative requirements to provide funding to community groups, however services provided by those groups contribute to Council’s Community Outcomes and deliver work that aligns to Council activities such as catchment management and biosecurity.

1.2      Alignment with Strategic Framework

 

A Healthy Environment

 

Freshwater for Life

 

Safe and Resilient Communities

 

A Vibrant Region

 

The Way We Work

 

Providing funding to applicants outlined in this paper will support a range of Community Outcomes and Goals.

1.2.1    Community Well-beings Assessment

Dominant Well-Beings Affected

¨ Environmental

Medium - Positive

¨ Cultural

Medium - Positive

¨ Social

Medium - Positive

¨ Economic

Medium - Positive

 

Projects outlined in this paper support different aspects of all four Community Well beings. 

 

1.3      Significance

The recommended proposal/decision has been assessed against the criteria and thresholds in Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy, and can be considered:

Medium

The decision is not within existing budgets and does not implement the current long term plan or annual plan.

 

2.        Key Decisions

2.1      Community Initiatives Fund

The Community Initiatives Fund (CIF) has a draft budget of $600,000 over three years ($200,000 per annum) for community-identified projects in the draft Long Term Plan 2024-2034. In total, 12 funding applications with a total value of $1.6 million over 3 years have been considered via the CIF. The majority of the funding applications are included in the full set of submissions, any late or transferred funding applications are attached to this paper.

Each funding application has been reviewed by a small panel of Council staff to assess alignment to Council’s Community Outcomes and Goals, including the priority (Horizon one) goals identified by Council as a focus for the next three years, and project deliverability.  The criteria for assessing funding requests does not include the impact on reduced funding for applicants from 1 July 2024. 

Council direction is being sought on whether to provide funding for each of the 12 applications, and at what level, noting the total budgeted funding for CIF is $200,000 per annum.

The table below summarises the funding requests, including staff recommendations. Given the current fiscal environment and the Council focus on delivering core business, staff recommendations are to decline most requests for funding.

Community Initiatives Fund applications summary - LTP 2024

Submission #

Project Title

Funding requested ($)

Staff recommendation ($)

2024/25

2025/26

2026/27

2024/25

2025/26

2026/27

10713

Ngā Uri Māui Trust

50,588

40,000

40,000

50,000

40,000

40,000

10516

Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Whakaue ki Maketū*

162,650

162,650

162,650

50,000

50,000

50,000

Application

 attached

Youth SAR

8,000

8,000

8,000

8,000

8,000

8,000

Application

 attached

Tauranga Moana Biosecurity Capital (TMBC)

100,000

100,000

100,000

50,000

50,000

50,000

10349

Sustainable Bay of Plenty Charitable Trust

50,000

50,000

50,000

0

0

0

10571

Rotorua X

9,999

7,499

4,999

0

0

0

10165

Western Bay of Plenty Heritage Trust (Western Bay Museum)

32,500

40,000

25,000

0

0

0

10563

REKA Charitable Trust

70,000

0

0

0

0

0

9843

The Stand Tall Community Trust

25,000

25,000

25,000

0

0

0

10464

SPCA

28,794

28,794

28,794

0

0

0

10477

Aquatic Survival Skills Trust

30,000

40,000

50,000

0

0

0

10552

The Preserving Local History and Educational Trust (Te Pupuri I Nga Hitori o Te Rohe Trust)

7,000

7,000

7,000

0

0

0

 

Total

574,531

508,943

501,443

158,000

148,000

148,000

Currently Budgeted in draft LTP

200,000

200,000

200,000

200,000

200,000

200,000

Balance

-374,531

-308,943

-301,443

42,000

52,000

52,000

*In addition to any funding allocated via CIF, the Climate Change Activity is planning to contribute $20,000 from existing activity budget. 

Staff recommendations in the table above will result in the budget for CIF being under allocated by $42,000 in Year 1 and $52,000 in Year 2 and 3.

Council can decide to change the allocations in the table above, including allocating the remaining budgeted funding up to the budget of $200,000 per annum. If Council decide to allocate funding over the budgeted $200,000 per annum this would have an impact on General Rates.

2.1.1    Ngā Uri Māui Trust (10713)

Summary

Ngā Uri Māui Trust and Te Kura Taiao Collective have been working in partnership with Iwi, mana whenua, Department of Conservation, Rotorua Lakes Council and local schools with the aim to create a predator free conservation area for the restoration of at risk native species within the Puarenga catchment. Work is focused on the Sanitorium Reserve in Rotorua.

Funding would be used for specialist scientific expertise including an Anthropologist, Ecologist and Kaumātua, as well as funding for workshops, and monitoring and safety equipment. 

The applicants are seeking a total of $130,588, with $50,588 in year one, reducing to $40,000 in years two and three of the LTP.

This funding application was received late, a copy is attached to this report as it is not included in the full set of submissions.  

Assessment

This project has been evaluated as follows:

Alignment to Community Outcomes

Average Rating*

Goal Alignment

A Healthy Environment/He taiao ora

Good

1, 2, 3, 4

Future ready communities/He hapori mata-hī awatea

Low

7

Connected communities/He hapori tūhono

Good

8, 9, 10

Sustainable development/He whanaketanga mauri tū roa

Low

11

The Pursuit of Excellence/Te Ara Poutama

Good

16, 17

Deliverability

 

 

Feasibility

Achievable

 

Budget

Achievable

 

Cost

Low

 

*Key to Average Rating range:

·      Community Outcome: None, Low, Good, Excellent.

·      Goal Alignment: Priority ‘Horizon 1’ Goals (2,3,5,10,11,14,15) are underlined.

·      Confidence in Deliverability: N/A (Not enough information), Low, Achievable

Comments

·      Sanatorium Reserve is a Priority Biodiversity Site 1 and is a geothermal site so any work in this site to enhance its ecological values is warranted. The wider Puarenga Stream has varying degrees of ecological value however linking up what is there with restoration will benefit the wider health of the environment.

·      Additional monitoring data will be useful and extending the group’s focus throughout new specific areas of the Puarenga stream will help enhance the overall biodiversity of the catchment. 

·      An organisation with a track record of providing opportunities and training both within the education system and alongside.

·      Strong community involvement alongside other organisations while protecting and enhancing the environment. Note support from Rotorua Lakes Council.

·      This organisation received a small Environmental Enhancement Fund grant in 2022/23 of $3,000, most costs associated with this proposal are not eligible for EEF funding e.g. staffing costs.    

·      The budget is considerable, further scrutiny should be applied in some areas e.g. monitoring equipment if the application is successful.

2.1.2    Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Whakaue ki Maketū (10516)

Summary

Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Whakaue ki Maketū are seeking funding to employ an FTE to enable the delivery of their Community Climate Change strategy which includes 12 Priority Projects and requires the coordination of a large number of community groups and government agencies.

The applicants are seeking a total of $487,950 across three years or $162,650 per annum. The funding will be used to; employ and upskill a 0.5 Full Time Employee (FTE) to implement their climate strategy, employ and support a 0.5 FTE to engage, collaborate and uplift actions for taiao restoration.   Build and share knowledge and review and enhance the Rūnanga resource management systems. 

Assessment

This project has been evaluated as follows:

Alignment to Community Outcomes

Average Rating*

Goal Alignment

A Healthy Environment/He taiao ora

Excellent

1, 2, 3, 4

Future ready communities/He hapori mata-hī awatea

Excellent

5, 6, 7

Connected communities/He hapori tūhono

Good

9,10

Sustainable development/He whanaketanga mauri tū roa

Good

11, 12, 13,

The Pursuit of Excellence/Te Ara Poutama

Excellent

14, 15, 16, 17

Deliverability

 

 

Feasibility

Achievable

 

Budget

Achievable

 

Cost

Achievable

 

*Key to Average Rating range:

·      Community Outcomes: None, Low, Good, Excellent.

·      Goal Alignment: Priority ‘Horizon 1’ Goals (2,3,5,10,11,14,15) are underlined.

·      Confidence in Deliverability: N/A (Not enough information), Low, Achievable

Comments

·      The application is strongly aligned with our Community Outcomes and the work programmes for climate change adaptation and land management, focused on the lower Kaituna. Overall the unifying themes are Partnerships with Māori and Community Participation.   

·      The applicants are leaders in both the climate and environmental restoration spaces.   

·      From a climate change programme perspective, the Maketū project is already an exemplar in terms of planning to adapt, the application would support implementation. The building of local capacity and capability is an investment in the long term. 

·      In addition to any funding allocated via the Community Initiatives Fund, staff have identified $20,000 of funding from the Climate Change Activity to support this project.  

2.1.3    Youth Search and Rescue (YSAR)

Summary

YSAR are seeking are seeking $8,000 per annum for three years as a contribution to the costs for supporting the development of trained Search and Rescue (SAR) and Emergency Management volunteers. 

This funding applications has been transferred from the Regional Safety and Rescue Service (RSRS) Fund following a request from the Civil Defence Emergency Management Joint Committee, as the application only partially met RSRS fund criteria. The RSRS funding application is attached to this report. 

Assessment

This project has been evaluated as follows:

Alignment to Community Outcomes

Average Rating*

Goal Alignment

A Healthy Environment/He taiao ora

None

 

Future ready communities/He hapori mata-hī awatea

Good

5

Connected communities/He hapori tūhono

Good

10

Sustainable development/He whanaketanga mauri tū roa

Low

11

The Pursuit of Excellence/Te Ara Poutama

Good

14, 15

Deliverability

 

 

Feasibility

Achievable

 

Budget

Achievable

 

Cost

Achievable

 

*Key to Average Rating range:

·      Community Outcomes: None, Low, Good, Excellent.

·      Goal Alignment: Priority ‘Horizon 1’ Goals (2,3,5,10,11,14,15) are underlined.

·      Confidence in Deliverability: N/A (Not enough information), Low, Achievable

Comments

·      Supports the sustainability of Search and Rescue (SAR) and Emergency Management (EM) services by providing opportunities and training for young SAR members.

·      Supports region-wide all year-round EM/SAR services. Proposal appears realistic in terms of being able to deliver in the time and budget outlined.

·      Organisation has a track record of performing. Previously received funding of $4,000 per annum via the Regional Safety and Rescue Service Fund, organisational consistently met deliverables in the funding agreement.

2.1.4    Tauranga Moana Biosecurity Capital (TMBC) – Late funding application

Summary

TMBC will create awareness of biosecurity threats that could impact the environmental and economic resilience of our region. By connecting across our communities, which include children, hapū/iwi, community organisations, industry, business, central government and local government we educate the people in our region and show them how we can all get involved and make a difference. Goal is to help prevent the establishment of new pests into our region, including those that would require long-term management by Council.

TMBC was previously funded to $100,000 via a combination of the Biosecurity Activity ($60,000), and CIF ($40,000). Council decided to remove funding of TMBC from the Biosecurity budget at a LTP workshop in 2023.

This funding application was received late, a copy is attached to this report as it is not included in the full set of submissions.  

Assessment

This project has been evaluated as follows:

Alignment to Community Outcomes

Average Rating*

Goal Alignment

A Healthy Environment/He taiao ora

Good

1, 2, 3, 4

Future ready communities/He hapori mata-hī awatea

None

 

Connected communities/He hapori tūhono

Good

9, 10

Sustainable development/He whanaketanga mauri tū roa

None

 

The Pursuit of Excellence/Te Ara Poutama

Good

14, 15, 16, 17

Deliverability

 

 

Feasibility

Achievable

 

Budget

Low

 

Cost

Achievable

 

*Key to Average Rating range:

·      Community Outcomes: None, Low, Good, Excellent.

·      Goal Alignment: Priority ‘Horizon 1’ Goals (2,3,5,10,11,14,15) are underlined.

·      Confidence in Deliverability: N/A (Not enough information), Low, Achievable

Comments

·      TMBC is about promotion and raising the level of awareness, they look to expand their reach and engage new members regularly. Engagement with youth is very useful.

·      TMBC actively seek to engage with mana whenua and hapū and bring Māori perspectives to biosecurity.

·      TMBC is a proven forum that has delivered for a number of years. As their application states, it is difficult to gauge the true impact of the forum in raising awareness and what that means for protecting the environment. </