Regional Council Agenda

NOTICE IS GIVEN that the next meeting of the Regional Council will be held in Bay of Plenty Regional Council Chambers, 1 Elizabeth Street, Tauranga and via Zoom (Audio Visual meeting) on:

Thursday 29 September 2022 COMMENCING AT 9.30 am

This meeting will be livestreamed and recorded.

The Public section of this meeting will be livestreamed and recorded and uploaded to Bay of Plenty Regional Council’s website.  Further details on this can be found after the Terms of Reference within the Agenda. Bay of Plenty Regional Council - YouTube

 

Fiona McTavish

Chief Executive, Bay of Plenty Regional Council Toi Moana

21 September 2022

 


 

Council

Membership

Chairperson

Chairman Doug Leeder

Deputy Chairperson

Cr Jane Nees

Members

All Councillors

Quorum

Seven members, consisting of half the number of members

Meeting frequency

Six weekly or as required for Annual Plan, Long Term Plan and other relevant legislative requirements

Purpose

·                Enable democratic local decision-making and action by, and on behalf of, Bay of Plenty communities.

·                Meet the current and future needs of communities for good-quality local infrastructure, local public services, and performance of regulatory functions in a way that is most cost-effective for households and businesses.

·                Set the overarching strategic direction for Bay of Plenty Regional Council as an organisation.

·                Hold ultimate responsibility for allocating financial resources across the Council.

Role

·                Address Local Electoral Act matters and Local Government Rating Act matters.

·                Oversee all matters relating to identifying and contributing to community outcomes.

·                Consider and agree on matters relating to significant new activities or areas of involvement such as infrastructure which are not the responsibility of a specific committee.

·                Provide regional leadership on key issues that require a collaborative approach between a number of parties.

·                Review and decide the Council’s electoral and representation arrangements.

·                Consider issues of regional significance which are not the responsibility of any specific standing committee or that are of such regional significance/high public interest that the full Council needs to decide on them.

·                Adopt Council’s Policy on Significance and Engagement Policy.

·                Develop, adopt and implement the Triennial Agreement, Code of Conduct and Standing Orders.

·                Consider and agree on matters relating to elected members’ remuneration.

·                Appoint the Chief Executive, and review their contract, performance and remuneration at least annually.

·                Approve all delegations to the Chief Executive, including the authority for further delegation to staff.

·                Oversee the work of all committees and subcommittees.

·                Receive and consider recommendations and matters referred to it by its committees, joint committees, subcommittees and working parties.

·                Approve membership to external bodies and organisations, including Council Controlled Organisations.

·                Develop, adopt and review policies for, and monitor the performance of, Council Controlled Organisations.

·                Monitor and review the achievement of outcomes for the Bay of Plenty Community.

·                Review and approve strategic matters relating to the sale, acquisition and development of property for the purposes of meeting Council’s organisational requirements and implement Regional Council policy.

·                Address strategic corporate matters including property and accommodation.

·                Consider and agree on the process to develop the Long Term Plan, Annual Plan and Annual Report.

·                Adopt the Long Term Plan, Annual Plan and budgets variations, and Annual Report.

·                Adopt Council policies as required by statute (for example Regional Policy Statement and Regional Land Transport Strategy) to be decided by Council or outside of committee delegations (for example infrastructure policy).

·                Develop, review and approve Council’s Financial Strategy and funding and financial policies and frameworks.

·                Institute any proceedings in the High Court that are not injunctive proceedings.

·                Exercise the powers and duties conferred or imposed on Council by the Public Works Act 1981.

Delegations from Council to committees

·                Council has a role to monitor the functioning of all committees.

·                Council will consider matters not within the delegation of any one Council committee.

·                Council may at any time, revoke or modify a delegation to a Council committee, either permanently, for a specified time or to address a specific matter, if it considers there is good reason to do so.

·                The delegations provided to committees may be further delegated to subcommittees unless the power of further delegation is restricted by Council or by statute.

·                It is accepted in making these delegations that:

·                The committees, in performing their delegated functions, powers or duties, may, without confirmation by the Council, exercise or perform them in a like manner and with the same effect as the Council itself could have exercised or performed them.

·                The delegated powers given shall at all times be subject to their current policies and principles or directions, as given by the Council from time to time.

·                The chairperson of each committee shall have the authority to exercise their discretion, as to whether or not the delegated authority of the committee be used where, in the opinion of the chairperson, circumstances warrant it.

Powers that cannot be delegated

Under Clause 32 Schedule 7 of the Local Government Act 2002, Council must make the following decisions:

·                Make a rate.

·                Make a bylaw.

·                Borrow money or purchase or dispose of assets, other than in accordance with the long-term plan.

·                Adopt the long-term plan, annual plan, or annual report.

·                Appoint a chief executive.

·                Adopt policies required to be adopted and consulted on under the Local Government Act 2002 in association with the long-term plan or developed for the purpose of the local governance statement.

·                Adopt a remuneration and employment policy.


 

Livestreaming and Recording of Meetings

Please note the Public section of this meeting is being recorded and streamed live on Bay of Plenty Regional Council’s website in accordance with Council's Live Streaming and Recording of Meetings Protocols which can be viewed on Council’s website. The recording will be archived and made publicly available on Council's website within two working days after the meeting on www.boprc.govt.nz for a period of three years (or as otherwise agreed to by Council).

All care is taken to maintain your privacy; however, as a visitor in the public gallery or as a participant at the meeting, your presence may be recorded. By remaining in the public gallery, it is understood your consent is given if your image is inadvertently broadcast.

Opinions expressed or statements made by individual persons during a meeting are not the opinions or statements of the Bay of Plenty Regional Council. Council accepts no liability for any opinions or statements made during a meeting.

 


Bay of Plenty Regional Council - Toi Moana

Governance Commitment

mō te taiao, mō ngā tāngata - our environment and our people go hand-in-hand.

 

 

We provide excellent governance when, individually and collectively, we:

·        Trust and respect each other

·        Stay strategic and focused

·        Are courageous and challenge the status quo in all we do

·        Listen to our stakeholders and value their input

·        Listen to each other to understand various perspectives

·        Act as a team who can challenge, change and add value

·        Continually evaluate what we do

 

 

TREAD LIGHTLY, THINK DEEPLY,
ACT WISELY, SPEAK KINDLY.


Regional Council                                                                                                     29 September 2022

Recommendations in reports are not to be construed as Council policy until adopted by Council.

Agenda

E te Atua nui tonu, ko mātau ēnei e inoi atu nei ki a koe, kia tau mai te māramatanga ki a mātau whakarite mō tēnei rā, arahina hoki mātau, e eke ai te ōranga tonu ki ngā āhuatanga katoa a ngā tangata ki tō mātau rohe whānui tonu. Āmine.

 

 

“Almighty God we ask that you give us wisdom in the decisions we make here today and give us guidance in working with our regional communities to promote their social, economic, environmental and cultural well-being.  Amen”.

1.       Opening Karakia

2.       Apologies

3.       Public Forum

4.       Items not on the Agenda

5.       Order of Business

6.       Declaration of Conflicts of Interest

7.       Public Excluded Business to be Transferred into the Open

8.       Minutes

Minutes to be Confirmed

8.1      Regional Council Minutes - 11 August 2022                                          4

8.2      Inactive Heading

Minutes to be Received

8.3      Te Maru o Kaituna River Authority Minutes - 20 May 2022                  4

8.4      Te Uepu Pāpāmoa Hills Cultural Heritage Regional Park Minutes - 31 May 2022                                                                                                   4

8.5      Rangitāiki River Forum Minutes - 3 June 2022                                      4

8.6      Tauranga Moana Advisory Group Minutes - 17 June 2022                   4

8.7      Regional Transport Committee Minutes - 19 May 2022                       4

8.8      Ōhiwa Harbour Implementation Forum Minutes - 26 April 2022         4

Minutes to be Confirmed – Continued

8.9      Council Minutes (Public) - 13 September 2022                                     4

9.       Reports

9.1      Chairperson's Report                                                                               4

Decisions Required

9.2      Adoption of the Bay of Plenty Regional Public Transport Plan 2022-2032

This item will be distributed under a separate cover.

9.3      Public Transport Services and Infrastructure Business Case - Delegated Authority Update                                                                                     4

9.4      10.00am Fixed Time: Quayside Group and Toi Moana Trust Annual Reports for the year ended 30 June 2022                                              4

Attachment 1 - QHL Financials - replace with full AR when available                          4

Attachment 2 - Recommendation on Quayside Director Fees                                       4

Attachment 3 - Toi Moana Trust draft Annual Report for year ended 30 June 2022  4

Supporting Document 1 - Aqua Curo draft Annual Report for year ended 30 June 2022

Supporting Document 2 - Quayside Barnett Place draft Annual Report for year ended 30 June 2022

Supporting Document 3 - Quayside Investment Trust draft Annual Report for year ended 30 June 2022

Supporting Document 4 - Quayside Mystery Valley draft Annual Report for year ended 30 June 2022

Supporting Document 5 - Quayside Portside Drive draft Annual Report for year ended 30 June 2022

Supporting Document 6 - Quayside Properties draft Annual Report for year ended 30 June 2022

Supporting Document 7 - Quayside Tauriko draft Annual Report for year ended 30 June 2022

Supporting Document 8 - Quayside Te Papa Tipu draft Annual Report for year ended 30 June 2022

Supporting Document 9 - Quayside The Vault draft Annual Report for year ended 30 June 2022

Supporting Document 10 - Quayside Unit Trust draft Annual Report for year ended 30 June 2022

Supporting Document 11 - Huakiwi Developments draft Annual Report for year ended 30 June 2022

Supporting Document 12 - Huakiwi Services draft Annual Report for year ended 30 June 2022

Supporting Document 13 - Lakes Commercial Developments draft Annual report for year ended 30 June 2022

Supporting Document 14 - Tauranga Commercial Developments draft Annual Report for year ended 30 June 2022

9.5      Toi Moana Trust Statement of Intent                                                     4

Attachment 1 - Toi Moana Trust Statement of Intent 2022/23                                      4

9.6      Community Participation Annual Report                                               4

9.7      Delegations Manual                                                                                  4

Attachment 1 - Recommended Delegation to the CE                                                     4

Supporting Document 1 - Delegations Manual

9.8      Rangitāiki Flood Protection Scheme - Stage 6                                     4

9.9      Procurement Plan for Rivers and Drainage Capital Works 2022/23   4

Attachment 1 - Procurement Plan for 2022-23 Capital Works (R&D)                           4

9.10    Infrastructure Insurance Renewal                                                           4

9.11    Te Uepu Papamoa Hills Cultural Heritage Regional Park Terms of Reference                                                                                                  4

Attachment 1 - Te Uepu Papamoa Hills Cultural Heritage Regional Park Advisory Group Terms of Reference                                                                                                  4

9.12    End of Triennium Matters                                                                        4

Information Only

9.13    Local Government Funding Agency Limited Annual Report for the year ended 30 June 2022                                                                                 4

Attachment 1 - LGFA Annual Report covering letter to shareholders                          4

Attachment 2 - LGFA Annual Report 2021/2022                                                             4

10.     Public Excluded Section

Resolution to exclude the public

Excludes the public from the following parts of the proceedings of this meeting as set out below:

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution are as follows:

Item No.

Subject of each matter to be considered

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Grounds under Section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

When the item can be released into the public

10.1

Public Excluded Regional Council Minutes - 11 August 2022

As noted in the relevant Minutes.

As noted in the relevant Minutes.

To remain in public excluded.

10.2

Public Excluded Te Uepu Pāpāmoa Hills Cultural Heritage Regional Park Minutes - 31 May 2022

As noted in the relevant Minutes.

As noted in the relevant Minutes.

To remain in public excluded.

10.3

Regional House and Whakatane Office Capital Works Procurement Plan and Exemption Request

Withholding the information is necessary to enable any local authority holding the information to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities.

48(1)(a)(i) Section 7 (2)(h).

On the Chief Executive's approval.

10.4

Public Transport Service Levels

Withholding the information is necessary to protect information where the making available of the information would be likely to unreasonably prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied or who is the subject of the information; Withholding the information is necessary to enable any local authority holding the information to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities; Withholding the information is necessary to enable any local authority holding the information to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations).

48(1)(a)(i) Section 7 (2)(b)(ii); 48(1)(a)(i) Section 7 (2)(h); 48(1)(a)(i) Section 7 (2)(i).

To remain in public excluded.

 

Minutes to be Confirmed

10.1    Public Excluded Regional Council Minutes - 11 August 2022

Minutes to be Received

10.2    Public Excluded Te Uepu Pāpāmoa Hills Cultural Heritage Regional Park Minutes - 31 May 2022

Decisions Required

10.3    Regional House and Whakatane Office Capital Works Procurement Plan and Exemption Request

Attachment 1 - CON000725 - Procurement Plan and Exemption Request - Q Construction

10.4    Public Transport Service Levels

This item will be distributed under a separate cover.

11.     Public Excluded Business to be Transferred into the Open

12.     Readmit the Public

13.     Consideration of Items not on the Agenda

14.     Closing Karakia


 Regional Council Minutes

11 August 2022

 

Regional Council

Open Minutes

Commencing:             Thursday 11 August 2022, 9.30 am

Venue:                         Council Chambers, Regional House, 1 Elizabeth Street, Tauranga and via Zoom (Audio Visual Meeting)

Chairperson:               Chairman Doug Leeder

Deputy Chairperson:  Deputy Chairperson Jane Nees

Members:                    Cr Bill Clark

Cr Stuart Crosby

Cr David Love

Cr Matemoana McDonald

Cr Stacey Rose (via Zoom)

Cr Paula Thompson

Cr Lyall Thurston

Cr Andrew von Dadelszen

Cr Te Taru White

Cr Kevin Winters

In Attendance:            Bay of Plenty Regional Council: Fiona McTavish – Chief Executive; Mat Taylor – General Manager Corporate; Chris Ingle – General Manager Integrated Catchments; Reuben Fraser – Consents Manager; Lorraine Cheyne - Transport & Urban Planning Manager; Kumaren Perumal – Chief Financial Officer; Mark Le Comte – Principal Advisor Finance; Yvonne Tatton – Governance Manager; Stephen Lamb – Environmental Strategy Manager (via Zoom); Toni Briggs - Senior Project Manager, Environmental Strategy (via Zoom); Matt Hunt – Communications Team Leader; Greg Corbett - Biosecurity Manager; Davor Bejakovich - Wallaby Programme Leader; Amber Rowe – Commercial Advisor; Debbie Tate – Commercial Advisor; Merinda Pansegrouw – Committee Advisor.

                                    External: Nick Tait - Lead Advisor Solutions and Development, Dairy NZ – via Zoom (Public Forum); Roger Lincoln - Principal Policy Advisor, Dairy NZ – via Zoom (Public Forum); Mark Butcher – Chief Executive Local Government Funding Agency – via Zoom (item 9.4)

Apologies:                  Cr Norm Bruning

 

Absent:                                   Cr Toi Kai Rākau Iti

1.     Chairman’s Opening Statement

Chairman Leeder advised those present in Chambers and via Zoom that the meeting was being livestreamed and recorded and that the recording would be made available on the Bay of Plenty Regional Council website following the meeting. Council Meeting - 11 August - YouTube.

2.     Opening Karakia

A karakia was provided by Cr Te Taru White.

3.     Apologies

Resolved

That the Regional Council:

1        Accepts the apologies from Cr Bruning and Cr Rose (early departure) tendered at the meeting.

Leeder/White

CARRIED

 

4.     Public Forum

4.1

Dairy NZ - He Waka Eke Noa Programme

Presentation Dairy NZ HWEN 11 August 2022: Objective ID A4174551   

 

Presented by: Dairy NZ Lead Advisor - Solutions and Development, Nick Tait and Principal Policy Advisor, Roger Lincoln.

Key Points – Presentation:

·    He Waka Eke Noa (Primary Sector Climate Action Partnership) was a world-first collaboration between government, the primary sector and Māori agribusiness to create a plan that would reduce agricultural emissions while enabling sustainable food and fibre production for future generations and competitiveness in international markets

·    Developed a practical framework to support farmers to measure, manage and reduce agricultural emissions; recognise, maintain, or increase integrated sequestration on farms and adapt to a changing climate

·    Recommended a practical, credible, and effective farm-level pricing system

·    Summary of key He Waka Eke Noa recommendations were provided to Ministers of the Crown (recommendations were informed by consultation/supported by technical information)

·    Recommended that the Government introduce a farm-level split-gas levy on agricultural emissions with built-in incentives to reduce emissions and sequester carbon

·    As the next step, Government would consider the Partnership’s advice alongside advice from the Climate Change Commission, before making decisions later this year on how agricultural emissions were to be priced from 2025.

Key Points - Members:

·    Acknowledged that it was a complex science driven debate

·    Interface with regional councils as regulators was critical

·    Emphasised the importance of continued engagement across communities/ongoing communications.

Next Steps:

·    Continued conversation as the programme developed

·    Dairy NZ provided further information with regard to Farm Case Studies and price implications available on their website: FINAL-He-Waka-Eke-Noa-Recommendations-Report.pdf (hewakaekenoa.nz)

 

5.     Declaration of Conflicts of Interest

·    Cr Stuart Crosby – Item 9.6: Quayside Group Statements of Intent

·    Cr Te Taru White - Item 9.6: Quayside Group Statements of Intent.

6.     Minutes

Minutes to be Confirmed

6.1

Regional Council Minutes - 23 June 2022

 

Resolved

That the Regional Council:

1        Confirms the Regional Council Minutes - 23 June 2022 as a true and correct record, subject to the following amendment:

·       Page 16 , item 7.3: fourth bullet: the typographical error “0.9%” to be corrected to “5.9%”.

Love/von Dadelszen

CARRIED

 

7.     Reports

7.1

Chairperson's Report

Key Points:

·    Elaborated on the itinerary of the Regional Sector Tour in Palmerston North 18 – 20 July 2022; key places of interest visited/discussion points addressed: Taupō-nui-a-tia, Tūwharetoa Māori Trust Board, Tongariro Power Scheme, Whanganui River claims Settlement Te Awa Tupua and locations that highlighted the importance of green hydrogen, primary industries, tourism and rail to regional prosperity

·    Written summary of the itinerary of the Regional Sector Tour in Palmerston North 18 – 20 July 2022 to be provided to Councillors.

 

Resolved

That the Regional Council:

1        Receives the report, Chairperson's Report.

Leeder/Thurston

CARRIED

 

Decisions Required

7.2

Recommendations from Public Transport Committee

Presented by: Lorraine Cheyne - Transport & Urban Planning Manager.

Key Point - Staff:

·    Staff would continue to work with New Zealand Transport Agency and Waikato Regional Council staff to determine if there was a possibility of a co-funding arrangement being reached.

 

Resolved

That the Regional Council:

1        Receives the report, Recommendations from Public Transport Committee.

2        Adopts the recommendations from the Public Transport Committee meeting held on 23 June 2022 specific to the report, Contract Renewal of 85 Connector Bus Service to:

(a) Endorse the continuation of Waihi Beach passenger transport service as a permanent two day a week service for a further 12 months; and

(b) Notes that associated funding has been included in the 2022-2023 Annual Plan.

Thompson/Thurston

CARRIED

 

7.3

Recommendations from Bay of Plenty Regional Navigation Safety Bylaws Review Subcommittee

 

Resolved

That the Regional Council:

1        Receives the report, Recommendations from Bay of Plenty Regional Navigation Safety Bylaws Review Subcommittee;

2        Approves changing and adopting the Navigation Safety Bylaws Review Subcommittee as a committee of Council and for the purpose of intent retrospectively applies all previous references to ‘subcommittee’ to mean ‘committee’.

3        Notes that Councillor Toi Iti was voted as Deputy Chair for the Navigation Safety Bylaws Review Committee;

4        Adopts the recommendations from the Bay of Plenty Regional Navigation Safety Bylaws Review Committee meeting held on 26 July 2022 specific to the report, Terms of Reference for the Navigation Safety Bylaws Review Committee to:

(a)  Recommends to Regional Council, adoption of the final Navigation Safety Bylaws Committee Terms of Reference.

Thompson/Crosby

CARRIED

 

7.4

Local Government Funding Agency Statement of Intent

Presentation LGFA Mark Butcher 11 August 2022: Objective ID A4177580   

Presented by: Mark Butcher Chief Executive, Local Government Funding Agency (LGFA), supported by Kumaren Perumal – Chief Financial Officer and Mark Le Comte – Principal Advisor Finance.

Key Points - Presentation:

·    Recent developments for the period 2021 – 2022

·    LGFA Historic Financial Ratios

·    LGFA Financial Statements for the period 6 Months to December 2021

·    Performance targets

·    Future Director Programme

·    Approach to sustainability

·    Lending Framework – borrowing categories

·    Three Waters Reforms - LGFA committed to assisting Central Government and councils with Three Waters Reform Programme.

Key Points - Members:

·    Congratulated LGFA on their sustainability initiatives, particularly the objectives/measures included in the Statement of Intent (SOI).

10:35am - Cr Rose withdrew from the meeting.

 

Resolved

That the Regional Council:

1        Receives the report, Local Government Funding Agency Statement of Intent.

2        Agrees that no formal feedback is required on the Local Government Funding-Agency Statement of Intent 2022-2025.

Winters/Nees

CARRIED

 

7.5

Bay of Plenty Local Authority Shared Services Statement of Intent

Presented by: Kumaren Perumal – Chief Financial Officer and Mark Le Comte – Principal Advisor Finance.

Key Points:

·    Provided a statement on behalf of Stephen Boyle, Chief Executive Bay of Plenty Local Authority Shared Services (BOPLASS) on the proposed Statement of Intent (SOI):

o Since Council’s consideration of the draft BOPLASS SOI in April 2022, the final proposed SOI had no material changes from the draft

o BOPLASS’s focus to remain on the improvement of procedures for procurement/other shared services initiatives, taking advantage of inter-regional collaboration to benefit on economies of scale

o BOPLASS to keep a watching brief on local government changes; workshops to follow in September 2022 to facilitate taking advantage of any collaborative/shared services initiates that might arise from imminent changes.

Key Points - Members:

·    Highlighted the abundance of opportunities available to BOPLASS to pursue; would be a function of the governance group of BOPLASS to provide further direction in this regard

·    Suggested BOPLASS reflect on the outcomes/changes effected by the recently rebranded Waikato LASS, now called Co-Lab

·    Would require a proactive attitude to embrace opportunities that future changes could bring.

Key Points - Staff:

·    In terms of climate change projects/opportunities, BOPLASS was currently considering projects relating to the improvement of waste management systems/processes/improving the efficiency of waste management

·    BOPLASS staff had recently been relocated to Bay of Plenty Regional Council Toi Moana’s Regional House to optimise/reduce costs

·    Update on progress with establishing the Regional Local Authority Shared Services: the Legal Team was currently considering the various shareholder agreements to ensure due diligence/compliance.  Once this process had been completed the relevant Statement of Intent would be provided to Council.

 

Item for Staff Follow Up:

·    Future report to Council on the initiatives/projects BOPLASS was considering regarding the improvement and efficiency of waste management systems and processes.

 

Resolved

That the Regional Council:

1        Receives the report, Bay of Plenty Local Authority Shared Services Statement of Intent;

2        Agrees that no formal feedback is required on the BOPLASS Statement of Intent 2021-2024; and

3        Requests a presentation on the strategic direction of BOPLASS to be provided at the next Council meeting.

Leeder/Crosby

CARRIED

 

10:50am - The meeting  adjourned.

11:15am - The meeting  reconvened.

11:15am - Cr McDonald withdrew from the meeting.

 

7.6

Quayside Group Statements of Intent

Cr Crosby and Cr White declared an interest in this item and abstained from voting.

Presented by: Kumaren Perumal – Chief Financial Officer and Mark Le Comte – Principal Advisor Finance.

Key Points - Members:

·    Acknowledged that the new approach followed in the Quayside Group  Statement of Intent (SOI) documents were more informative

·    Provided the following comments for consideration by staff/Quayside Group Directors:

o Explanations on the distribution policy was complex/hard to follow

o Requested clarification on the following statement as well as the practical implications thereof: “The value of the Port of Tauranga Shareholding is adjusted to normalise returns with the NZX50”

o Encouraged Quayside Group to consider the sustainability initiatives/objectives/measures included in the Local Government Funding Agency (LGFA) Statement of Intent (SOI)

·    Noted that in terms of governance responsibility/accountability regarding Statements of Intent, the requirement for Council was to receive Statements of Intent.

 

Items for Staff Follow Up:

·    Advise Councillors of the total number of canopy hectares of kiwi fruit covered by the eight kiwi orchards

·    Advise Councillors of the size of the forestry block on Mystery Valley Road

·    Provide an information session with any Councillors interested in obtaining further information/clarification on the Quayside Group Statement of Intent (SOI) documents and provide practical scenarios as examples.

11:22am - Cr McDonald entered the meeting.

 

Resolved

That the Regional Council:

1        Receives the report, Quayside Group Statements of Intent.

2        Agrees that no further formal feedback is required on the Quayside Group Statements of Intent.

Leeder/von Dadelszen

CARRIED

 

 

Information Only

7.7

Summary of Elected Members' Expenditure July 2021 - June 2022

Tabled Document 1 - Summary of Elected Members Expenditure July 2021- June 2022 BOPRC Councillor Expenditure Updated: Objective ID A4175015   

Presented by: Yvonne Tatton, Governance Manager.

Key Points - Staff:

·    Saving of $52,000 travel expenses for the 2021/2022 year was due to COVID restrictions and the large number of meetings attended via Zoom while the Epidemic Preparedness (COVID-19) Notice 2020 Renewal Notice 2022 was in effect.

Key Points - Members:

·    Encouraged Elected Members to prioritise professional development in their governance role and seize opportunities available

·    Suggested that emphasis be placed on professional development opportunities during the induction process at the commencement of the new triennium.

 

Resolved

That the Regional Council:

1.     Receives the report, Summary of Elected Members' Expenditure July 2021 - June 2022.

Winters/Leeder

CARRIED

 

8.     Public Excluded Section

Resolved

Resolution to exclude the public

1        Excludes the public from the following parts of the proceedings of this meeting as set out below:

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution are as follows:

Item No.

Subject of each matter to be considered

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Grounds under Section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

When the item can be released into the public

8.1

Public Excluded Regional Council Minutes - 23 June 2022

As noted in the relevant Minutes.

As noted in the relevant Minutes.

To remain in public excluded.

8.2

Whakarewarewa wallaby containment fence project

Withholding the information is necessary to enable any local authority holding the information to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities; Withholding the information is necessary to enable any local authority holding the information to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations).

48(1)(a)(i) Section 7 (2)(h); 48(1)(a)(i) Section 7 (2)(i).

On the Chief Executive's approval.

Leeder/Nees

CARRIED

 

9.     Closing Karakia

A karakia was provided by Cr Te Taru White.

11:52am – the meeting closed.

 

 

Confirmed                                                                                                                                          

                                                                                                                         Chairman Doug Leeder

Chairperson, Regional Council


 Te Maru o Kaituna River Authority Minutes

20 May 2022

 

Te Maru o Kaituna River Authority

Ngā Meneti

Open Minutes

Commencing:             Friday 20 May 2022, 9.30 am

Venue:                         Council Chambers, Ground Floor, Regional House, 1 Elizabeth Street, Tauranga, and via Zoom (Audio Visual Meeting)

Heamana

Chairperson:               Dean Flavell (Tapuika Iwi Authority Trust)

Heamana Tuarua

Deputy Chairperson:  Cr Matemoana McDonald (Bay of Plenty Regional Council)

Ngā Kopounga

Members:                    Bay of Plenty Regional Council

                                    Cr Jane Nees (Alternate)

Tapuika Iwi Authority

Geoff Rice (Alternate)

Te Pumautanga o Te Arawa

Rawiri Kingi (Alternate)

Rotorua Lakes Council

Nick Chater (Lakes Community Board)

Cr Tania Tapsell (Rotorua Lakes Council)

Western Bay of Plenty District Council

Cr Grant Dally

Deputy Mayor John Scrimgeour (Alternate)

Informal Members:     Te Komiti Nui o Ngāti Whakaue

Maru Tapsell

Manu Pene (Alternate)

Bay of Plenty Regional Council

Cr Te Taru White

 

Te Hunga i Tae Ake

In Attendance:            Bay of Plenty Regional Council: Cr Andrew von Dadelszen; Chris Ingle – General Manager Integrated Catchments; Pim De Monchy – Coastal Catchments Manager; Jo Watts – Senior Planner (Water Policy); Reuben Gardner – Senior Planner (Water Policy); Gemma Moleta - Senior Planner (Water Policy); James Dare – Environmental Scientist – Water Quality; Kirsty Brown – River and Drainage Assets Manager; Rawiri Bhana – Māori Policy Advisor; Riki-Lee Ainsworth - Planner; Jenny Teeuwen – Committee Advisor; Claudia Cameron – Committee Advisor

Western Bay of Plenty District Council: Matthew Leighton – Senior Policy Analyst

External: Mokoera Te Amo – Tapuika Iwi Authority and Te Kapu o Waitaha; Jane Walden - Co-Governance Secretariat; Elva Conroy and Hemi O’Callaghan - Pataka Kai Project

 

Ngā Hōnea

Apologies:                  Commissioner Shadrach Rolleston (Tauranga City Council), Commissioner Bill Wasley (Tauranga City Council), Erin Thompson (Te Tahuhu o Tawakeheimoa Trust) for absence, Deputy Mayor John Scrimgeour (Western Bay of Plenty District Council) for lateness and Cr Tania Tapsell (Rotorua Lakes Council) for early departure from the meeting.

 

 

1.     Chair’s Opening Statement

Chair Dean Flavell formally opened the hui and advised that the hui was being recorded and that the recording would be uploaded to the Bay of Plenty Regional Council website and could be accessed via this link: Te Maru o Kaituna - Zoom Video Recording - 20 May 2022 - YouTube

 

 

2.     Karakia Whakatuwhera
Opening Karakia

A karakia was provided by Mr Manu Pene.

 

3.     Ngā Hōnea
Apologies

Resolved

That Te Maru o Kaituna River Authority:

1        Accepts the apologies from Commissioner Shad Rolleston, Commissioner Bill Wasley and Erin Thompson (for absence), Deputy Mayor John Scrimgeour (for lateness) and Cr Tania Tapsell (for early departure from the meeting), tendered at the meeting.

Tapsell/Flavell

CARRIED

 

 

4.     Whakapuakanga o Ngā Take Whai Taha-Rua
Declaration of Conflicts of Interest

None declared.

 

5.     Ngā Meneti
Minutes

Kia Whakaūngia Ngā Meneti
Minutes to be Confirmed

5.1

Te Maru o Kaituna River Authority Minutes - 25 February 2022

 

Resolved

That Te Maru o Kaituna River Authority:

1        Confirms the Te Maru o Kaituna River Authority Minutes - 25 February 2022 as a true and correct record.

Nees/McDonald

CARRIED

 

 

6.     Whakaaturanga
Presentations

6.1

Pataka Kai Project Update

Presentation:    Pataka Kai Update: Objective ID A4101453   

Presented by:   Elva Conroy and Hemi O’Callaghan (Pataka Kai Project – Tapuika)

 

Key Points

·       The purpose of the project was to enhance habitats for kai awa, and to enable hapū and iwi to demonstrate, in a practical way, kaitiakitanga of ngā awa me ngā taonga of the Kaituna River.

·       Work completed to date included desktop research and the formation of a Working Group.

·       The focus for the next twelve months was to develop and implement a fisheries monitoring plan and connect whānau, hapū and iwi to the project.

·       The monitoring and management programmes would be line with the natural cycles of the tuna (eels), inanga (whitebait), kōura (crayfish), kākahi (freshwater mussels) and watercress.

·       Working collaboratively with Tapuika and Waitaha.

·       Looking at specific sites to take priority over the next year.  One area in particular was the Parawhenuamea Stream.

·       Invaluable advice and support had been received from Raponi Wilson (Department of Conservation) and Dr Kura Paul-Burke.

 

9.56am - Cr Tapsell withdrew from the meeting.

 

 

In Response to Questions

·       The Parawhenuamea Stream was only one of a half dozen options and was chosen as a starting point for the project because of the nature of the stream and the importance of it culturally.  What effect, if any, the old Te Puke landfill site had on the stream, was yet to be determined.

·       Connecting to other research programmes in the region had not happened to date, but would happen when the project was more established.

·       Delays with the Te Wai Māori contract had now been resolved.

Key Points - Members

·       Thanks were expressed for the excellent update and getting the project to this point.

·       The forum was reminded that Te Maru o Kaituna had a budget and funding from the budget could be made available to assist this project.  The forum would be included in any budget decisions.

·       It was suggested that the seven hectares of available land belonging to Tapuika and Whakaue just downstream of the Tauranga Eastern Link bridge across the Kaituna river, on the eastern side, would make a suitable area for a research station and would be a great place for learning.

 

 

7.     Whakahoutanga Kōrero
Verbal Updates

7.1

Chairperson's Report - Verbal Update

Presented by: Chair Dean Flavell

 

Key Points

·       The Chair welcomed Jane Waldon who had been appointed to the newly formed Te Maru o Kaituna River Authority and Rangitāiki River Forum Co-governance Secretariat position.

·       AFFCO had advised that they were working through the issues raised at the first resource consent pre-hearing as well as working on draft conditions.  These would be presented and discussed with submitters at a second pre-hearing meeting to be held on 24 May 2022.

·       Regional Policy Statement (RPS) Change 5 (Kaituna River) hearing dates had been set for 11 – 13 October 2022.

·       Last week, NZ Landcare Trust had facilitated an online discussion for the North Island on building meaningful catchment partnerships and hearing from Māori-led catchment groups about their mahi and insights.  The Chair had been invited to sit on the panel for this discussion.

·       An invitation to attend the DairyNZ and TAML Farm Wetland Environment Field Day at Maketū on 26 May 2022 from 11am to 1pm was extended.

·       The work that Te Maru o Kaituna was doing would be promoted at the Te Kete o Matariki event at Te Puke on Thursday 23 June (education day with local schools), and Friday 24 June (community celebration day).

The following verbal updates were also provided

 

·       Mr Nick Chater – Lakes Community Board

-     Rotorua Zipline project - involved working with local mana whenua on the restoration of the land bordering the Kaituna River with a long term aim of turning three hectares in to twelve hectares of reserve.  Projects to date including putting in 750 metres of stock fencing, removal of feral goats, and the planting of around 10,000 plants.  The zipline was officially opened on 5 May 2022.  Feedback to date, particularly from local iwi, was positive.

·       Cr Te Taru White – Bay of Plenty Regional Council

-      Following the signing of the Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) between Quayside Holdings Ltd and Tapuika, work was forging ahead with the expressway connection to the Rangiuru Industrial Park.

-      Provided a brief update on the Waihī Estuary restoration project.

10.36am – Deputy Mayor John Scrimgeour entered the meeting.

·       Cr Grant Dally – Western Bay of Plenty District Council (WBOPDC)

-      WBOPDC had progressed well with the marae wastewater project.  Work needed to be completed by 30 June 2022.

-      Te Puke/Maketu Reserve Management Plan was due to be adopted by WBOPDC on 14 June 2022.

-      The Te Puke History and Cultural Heritage Signs project was looking to provide new signage around Te Puke as part of a heritage trail.

·       Mr Geoff Rice – Tapuika Iwi Authority Trust

-      A riparian project was underway on Otukawa farm.  The farm bordered the Kaituna in parts on the northern side of Pah Road.  The project included refencing and replanting with the aim to improve the waterways in the area.

·       Cr Jane Nees – Bay of Plenty Regional Council

-      Regional Council’s Environmental Enhancement Fund was open for applications. $300,000 would be available in the new financial year.

 

 

8.     Ngā Pūrongo
Reports

Hei Pānui Anake
Information Only

8.1

Te Maru o Kaituna Action Plan March - May 2022 Status Report

Presentation:    Te Tini a Tuna March - May Quarterly Report: Objective ID A4101299   

Presented by:   Pim de Monchy, Coastal Catchments Manager

Key Points

·       An overall status update of projects showed that 10 of the 18 projects were on track, six projects had some slippage and two projects were yet to start.

·       Updates were provided for Project 1 (Output 1B) – Upgraded pump station at Ford Road, Project 4 – Waitepuia Focus Catchment, Project 7 (Output 7A) – Te Pā Ika Wetland, and Project 11A – Kaituna River access.

 

 

 

·       Operations Update:

-      The Bay of Plenty Regional Council (Regional Council) Maritime team had been working with Kaituna River locals and landowners to install “Slow Down for Swimmers” signage at identified swimming ‘hot spots’.

-      Regional Council had made an offer to Western Bay of Plenty District Council of $250,000 to undertake hardscape/landscaping at the Kaituna Mole with initial conversations indicating a new public toilet, carpark resurfacing and general landscaping in the carpark area being considered.

 

 

Resolved

That Te Maru o Kaituna River Authority:

1        Receives the report, Te Maru o Kaituna Action Plan March - May 2022 Status Report.

Dally/Flavell

CARRIED

 

 

8.2

Essential Freshwater Policy Programme Update

Presented by:   Jo Watts, Senior Planner (Water Policy)

Key Points

·       Regional Council’s online engagement tools Participate and WET (Water Ecology Tool) were demonstrated.

In Response to Questions

·       All submissions entered via the Participate tool were considered and evaluated.  The tool was an opportunity for anyone to have their say.

·       Trend analysis for WET attributes included ten years of data.  If ten years of data was not available, this was noted on the attribute.

·       Most Territorial Authorities (TA) in New Zealand were reporting trends on a ten yearly basis.  This provided trend information that was still relevant, but went beyond the variability that could occur over short terms.

·       There were four sites within the Kaituna Freshwater Management Unit (FMU).

·       Data collected from WET would also be available via the Land, Air, Water Aotearoa (LAWA) platform so the Ministry for the Environment (MfE) could also access the data through LAWA.

·       The WET tool was in its second iteration.  It was expected that the tool would go through a number of further iterations in the future so that as much feedback as possible could be obtained.

Key Points - Members

·       It was suggested that staff consider providing demonstrations of the online engagement tools at the Te Kete o Matariki event at Te Puke (23 – 24 June 2022).

 

 

 

Resolved

That Te Maru o Kaituna River Authority:

1        Receives the report, Essential Freshwater Policy Programme Update.

Flavell/Dally

CARRIED

 

 

8.3

Kaituna Catchment Control Scheme Advisory Group Update

Presented by:    Kirsty Brown – Rivers and Drainage Assets Manager

Key Points

·       The purpose of the report was to facilitate better communication flow between the Kaituna Catchment Control Scheme Advisory Group and Te Maru o Kaituna River Authority.

·       The report provided an overview of key topics discussed at the advisory group’s recent meeting on 4 April 2022.

In Response to Questions

·       Capacity review modelling for the Te Puke Stormwater project had been completed.  The project was now moving into the next stage looking at possible mitigation options or solutions to offset any adverse effects on the scheme from development in Te Puke.

·       Riparian planting provided a number of benefits for flood protection and maintenance of drains, and staff continued to support and work in this area.

·       Staff were working closely with the Rangiuru Industrial Park as part of their resource consent application and the park’s drainage issues would be included in this.

Key Points - Members

·       Concern was expressed regarding the further delay in the Ford Road Pump Station project with the cultural assessment.  The project was longstanding and with many delays and every delay was costing the ratepayers more money.

 

 

Resolved

That Te Maru o Kaituna River Authority:

1        Receives the report, Kaituna Catchment Control Scheme Advisory Group Update.

Flavell/Kingi

CARRIED

 

9.     Karakia Kati
Closing Karakia

A karakia was provided by Mr Geoff Rice.

 

12.00 pm – the meeting closed.

 

 

Confirmed 19 August 2022                                                                                                           

                                                                                                                                            Dean Flavell

Chairperson, Te Maru o Kaituna River Authority


Te Uepu Pāpāmoa Hills Cultural Heritage Regional Park Minutes

31 May 2022

 

Te Uepu Pāpāmoa Hills Cultural Heritage Regional Park

Ngā Meneti

Open Minutes

Commencing:             Tuesday 31 May 2022, 9:30 am

Venue:                         Council Chambers, Regional House, 1 Elizabeth Street, Tauranga and Via Zoom (Audio Visual Meeting)

Heamana

Chairperson:               Pim de Monchy (Coastal Catchments Manager)

Ngā Kopounga

Members:                    Cr Norm Bruning (Bay of Plenty Regional Council)

Cr Jane Nees (Bay of Plenty Regional Council)

Aroha Ririnui (Ngāti He)

Maru Tapsell (Alternate, Te Kapū o Waitaha)

Via Zoom:

Cr Matemoana McDonald (Bay of Plenty Regional Council)

Lara Burkhardt (Ngā Pōtiki a Tamapahore Trust)

Mokoera Te Amo (Te Kapu o Waitaha)

Sam Mikaere (Ngāti Pūkenga)

Te Hunga i Tae Ake

In Attendance:            Hayden Schick – Land Management Officer, Matthew Stulen – Consultant Planner, Shari Kameta – Committee Advisor

                                    Via Zoom

                                                      Bay of Plenty Regional Council: Cr Andrew von Dadelszen, Cr Te Taru White, Yvonne Tatton (Governance Manager)

Ngā Hōnea

Apologies:                  Cr Stuart Crosby (for absence), Cr Jane Nees (for early departure)

 

1.     Karakia Whakatuwhera
Opening Karakia

A karakia was provided by Mokoera Te Amo.

2.     Ngā Pūrongo
Reports

Ngā Whakatau e Hiahiatia Ana
Decisions Required

2.1

Te Uepu Chairperson(s) Appointments

Presented by:  Pim de Monchy (Coastal Catchments Manager)

                          Yvonne Tatton (Governance Manager)

Key Points:

·    Confirmed the mandated members as listed in the minute attendances.

·    Explained the options for a Chair structure and voting process for appointing the chair positions.

9.49am - Sam Mikaere entered the meeting.

·    Recommended a three year appointment term to align with the local authority election cycle, noting that this did not preclude a Co-Chair from standing down and for Te Uepu to appoint a new Chair.

Key Points - Members:

·    Consensus from the group supported a Co-Chair structure that would build the mana, capacity and experience of members and support working together within the local government operating environment.

 

Resolved

That Te Uepu Pāpāmoa Hills Cultural Heritage Regional Park:

1        Receives the report, Te Uepu Chairperson(s) Appointments.

2        Adopts a Co-Chair structure for Te Uepu with one Chair being a Regional Council member and one Chair being a Tangata Whenua member;

3        Agrees the appointments are to be for a 3 year term and to align with the local government elections cycle.

4        Selects System B as the voting system for the election of Co-Chairs or a Chairperson and Deputy Chairperson.

Nees/McDonald

CARRIED

Cr Bruning nominated Cr McDonald as the Regional Council Co-Chair, which was seconded by Cr Nees.

Maru Tapsell nominated himself as the Tangata Whenua Co-Chair, which was seconded by Aroha Ririnui. Mokoera Te Amo supported the nomination and advised he would amend his representation to that of Alternate Member with Maru as Te Kapū o Waitaha’s primary member to enable his appointment to the Co-Chair position.

 

It was clarified that the mandate to amend representation sat with the governing entity, therefore the nomination to appoint Maru Tapsell as Te Kapū o Waitaha’s primary member to enable him to be appointed as Co-Chair would be subject to confirmation from Te Kapū o Waitaha.

 

Maru advised that his appointment to Co-Chair would ensure appropriate direction and understanding of the park’s history, including wāhi tapu and surrounding whenua, which was important for Te Uepu to understand when making decisions.

5        Elects Cr Matemoana McDonald as the Regional Council Co-Chair of Te Uepu Pāpāmoa Hills Cultural Heritage Regional Park.

Bruning/Nees

CARRIED

6        Accepts the nomination of Maru Tapsell as the Tangata Whenua Co-Chair, subject to confirmation from Te Kapū o Waitaha that he be appointed as Te Kapū o Waitaha’s primary member and Mokoera Te Amo be appointed as the Alternate Member.

Te Amo/Ririnui

CARRIED

 

Co-Chair Cr McDonald requested that Pim de Monchy continue chairing the meeting for its duration.

 

3.   Ngā Hōnea
Apologies

Resolved

That the Te Uepu Pāpāmoa Hills Cultural Heritage Regional Park:

1        Accepts the apology from Cr Stuart Crosby (for absence) and Cr Jane Nees (for early departure at 11.30 am) tendered at the meeting.

Bruning/McDonald

CARRIED

4.   Ngā Take Tōmuri
Items not on the Agenda

4.1

Public Excluded Item 11.2 - Papamoa Hills Park Ranger role

 

Resolved

That the Te Uepu Pāpāmoa Hills Cultural Heritage Regional Park:

1     Receives the report, Pāpāmoa Hills Park Ranger role and accepts it as an Item not on the Agenda. Notes the reason why this item was not on the Agenda is that work on the procurement process had not progressed sufficiently when the agenda was drafted, and the reason why it cannot be delayed is that
Te Uepu meets very infrequently.

Nees/McDonald

CARRIED

 

5.     Whakapuakanga o Ngā Take Whai Taha-Rua
Declaration of Conflicts of Interest

None declared.

6.     Ngā Meneti
Minutes

Ngā Meneti a Ngā Komiti
Minutes to be Confirmed

6.1

Te Uepu Papamoa Hills Cultural Heritage Regional Park Meeting Minutes - 9 December 2021

Matters arising

1.     Signage content (agenda page 7) - Aroha Ririnui provided an explanation of the whakatauki that had been chosen for the park signage – “E kore au e ngaro, he kākano i ruia mai i Rangiātea” related to the physical and metaphysical in relation to achieving and attaining higher learning and envisioning your horizons. The whakatauki had been used at the original entrance way and some of the explanation could be found on wikipedia.

2.     Pāpāmoa Hills upgrade project (agenda page 8) – Three Waters funding had been sought but was unsuccessful however, it was noted that other avenues would be pursued where available, including seeking funding opportunities from Te Papa Atawhai/Department of Conservation.

3.     All other actions from the 9 December 2021 meeting had been completed.

 

Resolved

That Te Uepu Pāpāmoa Hills Cultural Heritage Regional Park:

1        Confirms the Te Uepu Papamoa Hills Cultural Heritage Regional Park Meeting Minutes - 9 December 2021 as a true and correct record.

Nees/McDonald

CARRIED

7.     Ngā Whakamārama a Ngā Rōpū
Update from Partners

Maru Tapsell – Te Kapu o Waitaha

·    Noted the importance of social capital/responsibility in triple bottom lines within park management.

No further updates were provided.

8.     Ngā Pūrongo
Reports (Continued)

Ngā Whakatau e Hiahiatia Ana
Decisions Required

8.1

Te Uepu Pāpāmoa Hills Cultural Heritage Regional Park Draft Terms of Reference Discussion

Presented by:  Yvonne Tatton (Governance Manager)

Key Points:

·     Noted that the agenda format for the meeting aligned with Local Government Act requirements for Council meetings, which would be reviewed and amended for Te Uepu hui that don’t have the same requirements.

·     The Terms of Reference (TOR) would formalise Te Uepu’s partnership between iwi/hapū and Toi Moana and retain the group’s purpose as established through the Memorandum of Understanding.

·     Explained the options for decision-making alongside additional advisory, financial and monitoring functions, some of which had been identified as requiring clarification within the TOR.

·     Welcomed feedback to assist the development of a draft TOR, which would be presented back to Te Uepu, before being provided to the partner organisations for approval.

In Response to Questions:

·     Decision making by consensus was the current method used by Te Uepu.

·     There had only been one previous decision where a resolution could not be agreed to by Te Uepu’s tangata whenua members in relation to the naming of the park. In this instance, a tikanga process had been followed and as a consequence of members not being able to come to a resolution, the park’s original name was retained.

·     The intent for matters to be referred to the Regional Council for decision, where consensus could not be reached, was in relation to significant matters regarding  park management only. Direction on decisions that related to cultural matters would be sought from tiwi/hapu members.

·     It was understood and accepted that iwi/hapu members may caucus on matters prior to Te Uepu hui.

·     The casting vote would only sit with the Co-Chair who was chairing the meeting (rather than both Co-Chairs having a casting vote).

·     Quorum requirements would be brought back for discussion with the Terms of Reference however it was intended that the quorum provide for an equal number of tangata whenua and council members.

Key Points - Members:

·    Members supported decision-making by consensus as the preferred way forward.

·    Considered that Co-Chairs would have a responsibility to discuss and work issues through together.

·    Noted that staff would provide financial and budget advice and options for consideration.

 

Items for Staff Follow Up:

·    Requested options be provided on quorum requirements for meetings and  that caucusing be validated and provided for in the Terms of Reference.

 

Resolved

That Te Uepu Pāpāmoa Hills Cultural Heritage Regional Park:

1        Receives the report, Te Uepu Pāpāmoa Hills Cultural Heritage Regional Park Draft Terms of Reference Discussion.

2        Agree that a draft Terms of Reference be developed based on the direction provided at this meeting.

3        Agree that the draft Terms of Reference be reported back to Te Uepu to review prior to being recommended for adoption to the partner organisations.

McDonald/Te Amo

CARRIED

11:05 am – Cr von Dadelszen and Cr White withdrew from the meeting.

Hei Pānui Anake
Information Only

8.2

Park Operations Update

Presented by:  Pim de Monchy (Coastal Catchments Manager)

Key Points:

·    Visitor numbers were lower than the previous year, which was likely due to the Te Puke highway being severely affected by roadworks. As a result of this, Council’s KPI was unlikely to be met.

 

Resolved

That Te Uepu Pāpāmoa Hills Cultural Heritage Regional Park:

1        Receives the report, Park Operations Update.

Bruning/Ririnui

CARRIED

 

8.3

Te Whakarauoratanga o Te Rae o Pāpāmoa | Car Park and Entry Upgrade Project Update

Presentation - Pāpāmoa Hills upgrade project: Objective ID A4113286   

Presented by: Matt Stulen, Consultant Planner

Key Points:

·    Provided an overview of Stage 1 construction preload work that had been completed by successful tenderer HEB Contractors.

·    Outlined the timeline for construction.

·    Stage 2 Request for Tenders would commence in early 2023.

·    Thanked Aroha for her work and cultural monitoring on site.

In Response to Questions:

·    Temporary stream diversion was to stabilise the banks to prevent erosion.

Key Points - Members:

·    Highlighted the cultural significance and origin of the stream, which was wāhi tapu and that stream diversion needed to be carefully managed.

·    Cultural monitoring took into consideration all environmental aspects relating to water, land and air.

·    Encouraged other cultural monitors to be involved where interested.

·    Emphasised the importance of protecting the mauri of the whenua.

 

Resolved

That Te Uepu Pāpāmoa Hills Cultural Heritage Regional Park:

1        Receives the report, Te Whakarauoratanga o Te Rae o Pāpāmoa | Car Park and Entry Upgrade Project Update.

Nees/Bruning

CARRIED

 

11:28 am – Cr Nees withdrew from the meeting.

9.     Wāhanga Tūmataiti
Public Excluded Section

Resolution to exclude the public

Excludes the public from the following parts of the proceedings of this meeting as set out below:

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution are as follows:

Item No.

Subject of each matter to be considered

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Grounds under Section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

When the item can be released into the public

11.1

Pāpāmoa Hills Upgrade Project - proposed land swap for pedestrian access

Withholding the information is necessary to: protect the privacy of natural persons, including that of deceased natural persons; protect information where the making available of the information would be likely to unreasonably prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied or who is the subject of the information; enable any local authority holding the information to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities.

Section 48(1)(a)(i) section 7(2)(a); section 48(1)(a)(i) section 7(2)(b)(ii); section 48 (a)(a)(i) section 7(2)(h)

On the Chief Executive’s approval.

11.2

Pāpāmoa Hills  Park Ranger role

Withholding the information is necessary to enable any local authority holding the information to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities.

Section 48 (a)(a)(i) section 7(2)(h)

On the Chief Executive’s approval.

McDonald/Ririnui

CARRIED

10.   Rā Hui Whai Ake: 8 Hakihea  2022

        Next Meeting Date: 8 December 2022

Pim de Monchy advised that Te Uepu were now unable to meet on 8 December due to the unavailability of Council’s elected members following the local authority elections. Staff would follow-up with members in due course to provide alternative dates in either September or early 2023.

11.   Karakia Kati
Closing Karakia

A karakia was provided by Mokoera Te Amo.

12:06 pm – the meeting closed.

Confirmed 26 August 2022                                                                                                           

                                       Pim de Monchy – Coastal Catchments Manager BOPRC (Acting Chair)
Te Uepu Pāpāmoa Hills Cultural Heritage Regional Park


 Rangitāiki River Forum Minutes

3 June 2022

 

Rangitāiki River Forum

Ngā Meneti

Open Minutes

Commencing:             Friday 3 June 2022, 10:00am

Venue:                         Via Zoom (Audio Visual Meeting)

Heamana

Chairperson:               Bronco Carson (Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Whare)

Heamana Tuarua

Deputy Chairperson:  Terewai Kalman (Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Manawa)

Ngā Kopounga

Members:                    Bay of Plenty Regional Council

                                    Crs Bill Clark, Toi Kai Rākau Iti and Kevin Winters

Hineuru Iwi Trust

                                                      Mei Winitana

Taupō District Council

                                                      Cr John Williamson

                                                      Te Rūnanga o Ngati Awa

                                                      Miro Araroa and Tuwhakairiora O'Brien (Alternate)

Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Manawa

Karito Paul (Alternate)

Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Whare

Jane Nicholas (Alternate)

Tūhoe Te Uru Taumatua

                                                      Ngapera Rangiaho

                                                      Ngāti Tūwharetoa (Bay of Plenty) Settlement Trust

                                                      Shaneen Simpson-Almond

Whakatāne District Council

                                                      Crs Alison Silcock and Wilson James (Alternate)

Te Hunga i Tae Ake

In Attendance:            Jane Waldon – Co-Governance Secretariat;

                                    Bay of Plenty Regional Council: Chris Ingle - General Manager Integrated Catchments, Mieke Kapa – Land Management Officer, Michelle Lee – Planner (Water Policy), Nassah Rolleston-Steed – Policy & Planning Manager, Julie Bevan – Acting General Manager Strategy & Science, Shari Kameta (Committee Advisor);

                                                      Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Manawa: Maxeen Newton – Pou Taiao; Whakatāne District Council: Cr Lesley Immink, Astrid Hutchinson - Infrastructure Compliance Specialist

Ngā Hōnea

Apologies:                  Cr Tangonui Kingi (for absence)

                                    Brenda Lewis (for absence)

                                                      Whakaeke Ritete (for late arrival/absence)

 

1.     Karakia Whakatuwhera
Opening Karakia

A karakia was provided by Miro Araroa, followed by a mihi to welcome Shaneen Simpson-Almond onto the Forum.

2.     Ngā Hōnea
Apologies

Resolved

That the Rangitāiki River Forum:

1        Accepts the apologies from Cr Tangonui Kingi, Brenda Lewis and Whakaeke Ritete for late arrival/absence tendered at the meeting.

Rangiaho/Araroa

CARRIED

3.     Raupapa o Ngā Take
Order of Business

Agenda item 9.3 - Manawa Energy Update on the Matahina Dam Downstream Trap and Transfer Programme was withdrawn from the agenda by Ryan Piddington, Manawa Energy to enable a discussion to take place first with Ngāti Awa before an update is provided to the Forum.

Resolved

That the Rangitāiki River Forum:

1      Accepts the withdrawal of Agenda item 9.3 Manawa Energy Update on the Matahina Dam Downstream Trap and Transfer Programme from the agenda.

Araroa/Simpson-Almond

CARRIED

4.     Whakapuakanga o Ngā Take Whai Taha-Rua
Declaration of Conflicts of Interest

None declared.

5.     Ngā Meneti
Minutes

Kia Whakaūngia Ngā Meneti
Minutes to be Confirmed

5.1

Rangitāiki River Forum Minutes - 4 March 2022

Matters Arising

1.       In relation to Minute Item 5.2 – regarding the Wheao reconsent update – Ngāti Manawa would be engaging a consultant to undertake a Cultural Impact Assessment.

2.       In relation to Minute Item 6.2 – the funding application made to the Lions Foundation to help fund a self-contained toilet on the eastern bank of the Thornton river mouth had been approved. It was noted that the application was amongst other funding sources being pursued.

 

Resolved

That the Rangitāiki River Forum:

1        Confirms the Rangitāiki River Forum Minutes - 4 March 2022 as a true and correct record, subject to the following amendments:

 

·    Minute item 6.2 ‘November 2021-February 2022 Rangitāiki Catchment Programme Dashboard Report’ (agenda page 13) - Key Points members: last bullet point: "An application to Regional Councils Environmental Enhancement Fund had been unsuccessful..." should read: “An application to the Trustpower - Rangitaiki River Environmental Fund Trust was unsuccessful...”

Rangiaho/Winitana

CARRIED

6.     Whakaaturanga
Presentations

6.1

Old Rangitāiki River Channel Projects

Presentation - Old Rangitaiki River Channel Projects: Objective ID A4119306   

Presented by: Mieke Kapa, Land Management Officer

 

Mieke Kapa provided a presentation on two projects that were taking place along the old Rangitāiki River channel.

Key Points:

Smith Road Crossing Culvert Upgrade

·    Bay of Plenty Regional Council (BOPRC) and Whakatāne District Council (WDC) were working collaboratively together to upgrade the culverts underneath the Smith Road crossing, which go over the old Rangitāiki river channel.

·    WDC had investigated the two culverts and flushed the 1800mm culvert that was partially blocked, however the 1200mm culvert was blocked and found to be collapsing the road, therefore there was a level of urgency to have the culvert replaced.

·    Photos taken in May 2021 showed the blockage impacts within the channel.

·    Proposed options were being considered to upgrade the 1200mm culvert to 1800mm, or to replace both culverts with a single box culvert to create additional tidal flow and improve habitat on the eastward side. A decision on what the best option for the site is was yet to be determined.

Old Rangitāiki River Channel Pond

·    The river channel pond and island was situated on Department of Conservation (DoC) administered land to the left of Thornton Road.

·    BOPRC had a community agreement with DoC for the site.

·    Photos taken in early May 2022 showed water quality degradation in the pond.

·    The culvert had now been replaced, a causeway constructed and the island mulched and sprayed in preparation for planting.

·    The proposed plan was to plant the entire island with native plants over the coming years, with the first lot of planting taking place during the week by  Tāne Mahuta Aotearoa Ltd.

In Response to Questions:

·    The project was financially funded by the BOPRC with agreement and collaboration from DoC.

·    Plant species that were being used included upoko-tangata, karamu, totara, harakeke, kauka, kiekie and Thornton kanuka.

·    The specific harakeke species were unknown; however, all of the plants were grown locally by Coastlands nursery who would be open to sourcing species to collect and grow.

·    Teresa McCauley and Pete Livingston were the DoC staff who were involved with the project and community agreement.

·    The river channel pond was a site used by whitebait inanga spawning, but did not have any evidence of this at the Smith Road crossing; however, future invertebrate surveys may be able to provide further information.

Key Points – Members:

·    Planting of locally sourced harakeke and kiekie would be beneficial for local iwi/hapū to gather for traditional resources to assist with local marae revitalisation projects.

·    DoC administered land allowed mana whenua to have guaranteed access to the area for cultural material plans, therefore the respective iwi/hapū could contact the relevant DoC community ranger to enquire and discuss.

Items for Staff Follow Up:

·    Follow-up with Mei Winitana regarding the sourcing of local plant species.

 

Resolved

That the Rangitāiki River Forum:

1        Receives the presentation, Old Rangitāiki River Channel Projects.

Clark/Simpson-Almond

CARRIED

7.     Whakahoutanga Kōrero
Verbal Updates

The following Agenda item 9.2 was received before Agenda item 9.1, Forum Members Verbal Updates.

 

7.1

Update on the Bill Kerrison Memorial Sculpture at Aniwhenua Reserve

Presentation - Bill Kerrison Memorial - Concept sketches, design and themes: Objective ID A4119308   

Presented by: Karito Paul (Alternate member, Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Manawa)

 

Key Points:

·    Karito and Cr Silcock had worked together with artist Himiona Nuku on the overall design concept for Bill Kerrison’s memorial.

·    The design was textual, large in scale and based on the model of a hinaki that would incorporate a shelter, carved waharoa, tuna motifs, tuna life cycle information and a monument board dedicated to Bill’s life mahi.

·    The design concept had been shared with Bill’s whānau and wife Ruby who were impressed with the concept and the continuation/recognition of Bill and his mahi.

·    Personalised commemorations on the monument board would be shared with Bill’s whānau before they were finalised.

·    The monument’s orientation would face north to reflect the tuna migration with its location yet to be determined.

10:30 am – Cr Silcock entered the meeting.

In Response to Questions:

·    A funding application would be submitted to BOPRC’s Environmental Enhancement Fund which opened in July 2022 and other funding avenues could be pursued if needed.

·    Did not consider funding to construct the memorial would be an issue due to Bill’s status and mana which a number of people, community groups and agencies held in high regard.

·    General maintenance and upkeep would need to be a consideration however, noted that Holly’s Playground was well maintained by the community.

·    Envisioned that the kaitiaki/maintenance of the memorial would be held by the students of Bill; however, still needed to be discussed.

Key Points - Members:

·    Commended the fantastic design concept that would keep the continuation of Bill’s mahi alive; and seeking endorsement of it from Bill’s whānau.

·    Incorporating recognition of Trustpower and Mangu Clark from Uiraroa Marae to acknowledge their support of Bill’s work and the establishment and operation of the Kokopu Trust was noted and acknowledged.

·    Noted that the responsibility of maintenance and upkeep of the memorial needed further consideration. Initial thoughts envisioned the upkeep as a shared responsibility by Kokopu Trust students, tuna kaimahi and local hapū/whānau/community.

·    Construction and maintenance needed to consider health and safety.

·    Considered that the Regional Council may be able to support the shared maintenance of the memorial.

 

Resolved

That the Rangitāiki River Forum:

1        Receives the Verbal Update on the Bill Kerrison Memorial Sculpture at Aniwhenua Reserve.

Rangiaho/Araroa

CARRIED

 

7.2

Forum Members' Verbal Updates

 

Cr Bill Clark – Bay of Plenty Regional Council

·    Referred to a published article about an irrigation scheme in the South Island that had installed fish passage at a cost of $18M, which would be beneficial to investigate.

Ngapera Rangiaho – Tūhoe Te Uru Taumatua

·    Provided an update on activities from Waiohau:

o   Civil defence emergency management workshop training was held with Justin Douglas and local Haumaru team at Waiohau Marae.

o   Willow clearance had been completed in the Waikokopu stream and was looking great.

o   Resource consent activity - roadworks, culvert replacement and restoration work was progressing well by Wilson Farm.

o   Quarry owner Jessica Wisemen consented activity was progressing well with regular engagement from local Kaumātua Tom Tupe and Tunihia Tupe regarding cultural assessment and safety management to ensure community safety is maintained.

·    Update on Kokopu Trust activity:

o   Had visited Manawa Energy to observe Stage 2 of the elver elevator in-river installation trial. The first attempt had been unsuccessful and feedback/consideration given to the use of more natural materials that were being used by the current transfer operation.

o   Expressed thanks to Manawa Energy for providing a two-day boat and navigation training to Kokopū Trust representatives, which had been greatly received and appreciated. Further training opportunities was to be offered to other local iwi/hapū representatives.

Mei Winitana – Ngāti Hineuru

·    An invitation would be extended to Forum members towards early 2023 for a rescheduled visit and pōwhiri to Te Haroto marae, Lake Pouarua and other sites.

·    Noted that litigation with Hawke’s Bay Regional Council was pending in relation to a Mohaka river tributary and resource consent process for aggregate river takes.

·    Geothermal feasibility studies were being undertaken for the Tarawera Hot Springs (located on Taupō-Napier Highway).

Shaneen Simpson-Almond – Ngāti Tūwharetoa (BOP) Settlement Trust

·    Noted that Tūwharetoa mai Kawerau ki te Tai had a geothermal team which Ngāti Hineuru’s Board may wish to seek advice from.

8.     Ngā Pūrongo
Reports

Ngā Whakatau e Hiahiatia Ana
Decisions Required

8.1

Change in Membership

 

Resolved

That the Rangitāiki River Forum:

1        Receives the report, Change in Membership.

2        Confirms the appointment of Shaneen Simpson-Almond as the appointed member for Ngāti Tūwharetoa (Bay of Plenty) Settlement Trust, replacing Clifford Te Riini (Appointed Member) and Paora Hunia (Alternate member).

Winitana/Araroa

CARRIED

Hei Pānui Anake
Information Only

8.2

Rangitaiki Catchment Programme Dashboard - March-May 2022

Presented by:  Chris Ingle (General Manager Integrated Catchments)

Key Points:

·    Noted there was a significant amount of work taking place and the majority of projects were progressing well.

In Response to Questions:

·    Peter Mulvihill (Consultant for Southern Generation Partnership Limited) and Charles Harley (Team Leader Eastern Catchments) were investigating methods for lake weed control at Lake Aniwaniwa. Some discussions had been held with Ngāti Manawa and potential engagement of NIWA being pursued and to be confirmed.

·    River scheme maintenance programme (action under Objective 7) included native plant restoration and clearing that was currently taking place around the Te Teko bridge.

Items for Staff Follow Up:

·    Actions 5.5 and 8.6 - provide an update on progress made with engaging NIWA to review weed control methodology at Lake Aniwaniwa.

·    Action 2.3 Upper Rangitāiki wilding conifer programme work – Miro Araroa queried if local rangatahi were or could be involved in this mahi.

·    Requested a timeframe indicator within the Dashboard report to identify where programmed works were at in terms of their completion.

 

Resolved

That the Rangitāiki River Forum:

1        Receives the report, Rangitaiki Catchment Programme Dashboard - March-May 2022.

Silcock/Winters

CARRIED

 

8.3

Essential Freshwater Policy Programme Update

Presentation - EFPP Update and Visions: Objective ID A4119307 

Presentation - Rangitaiki Freshwater Update Online Tools Demo: Objective ID A4119311   

Presented by:  Michelle Lee (Planner (Water Policy))

Key Points:

·    Essential Freshwater Policy Programme (EFPP) work was currently on schedule for the Rangitāiki.

·    Current focus was engaging with iwi/hapū who were willing to engage.

·    Expressed thanks for the feedback that had been shared by Iwi members in the last few months on incorporating perspectives of Mātauranga Māori.

·    Demonstrated the interactive tools (i.e. WET) that was now available online at www.participate.boprc.govt.nz/vision-and-outcomes/rangitaiki-feedback for people to express thoughts on Rangitāiki freshwater values that would help inform long term visions alongside tangata whenua input.

·    Feedback could be submitted online by 29 June and would be eligible to enter a draw for $200 gift vouchers.

·    Baseline indicators related to the bands within the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management (NPS-FM).

·    Encouraged members to use the WET tool to provide feedback.

 

Resolved

That the Rangitāiki River Forum:

1        Receives the report, Essential Freshwater Policy Programme Update.

Rangiaho/Clark

CARRIED

 

8.4

Update from the Rangitaiki-Tarawera Rivers Scheme Advisory Group

Presented by:  Chris Ingle (General Manager Integrated Catchments)

Key Points:

·    The aim of the report was to provide a better level of understanding and communication of what was being discussed by the River Scheme Advisory Group and to determine if Forum members wished to become involved or seek further information.

·    Noted that Councillors Bill Clark and Toi Iti were members of the advisory group and provided a good link between the two groups.

Key Points - Members:

·    Ngapera noted that Tūhoe’s Tribal Authority Chair Patrick McGarvey had shown an interest to attend the Whakatāne River Scheme Advisory Group hui, which was good to see.

 

Resolved

That the Rangitāiki River Forum:

1        Receives the report, Update from the Rangitaiki-Tarawera Rivers Scheme Advisory Group.

Silcock/Simpson-Almond

CARRIED

 

9.     Karakia Kati
Closing Karakia

A karakia was provided by Miro Araroa.

11:30 am – the meeting closed.

 

 

Confirmed 2 September 2022                                                                                                      

                                                                                                                                       Bronco Carson

Chairperson, Rangitāiki River Forum


 Tauranga Moana Advisory Group Minutes

17 June 2022

 

Tauranga Moana Advisory Group

Ngā Meneti

Open Minutes

Commencing:             Friday 17 June 2022, 09:30 am

Venue:                         Council Chambers, Regional House, 1 Elizabeth Street, Tauranga and via Zoom (Audio Visual Meeting)

Heamana

Chairperson:               Cr Matemoana McDonald (Bay of Plenty Regional Council Toi Moana)

Heamana Tuarua

Deputy Chairperson:  Charlie Tawhiao (Ngāi Te Rangi)

Ngā Kopounga

Members:                    BOPRC Toi Moana: Cr Norm Bruning; Cr Jane Nees (via Zoom); Cr Paula Thompson (via Zoom)

Ngāti Pūkenga: Keepa Smallman

Western Bay of Plenty District Council (WBOPDC): Cr Mark Dean

Tauranga City Council (TCC): Commissioner Shadrach Rolleston (via Zoom); Commissioner Bill Wasley (via Zoom)

Observer – Department of Conservation (DOC): Jeff Milham – Pou Matarautaki/District Manager Te Papa.

 

In Attendance:            BOPRC Toi Moana: Chris Ingle – General Manager, Integrated Catchments; Pim De Monchy – Coastal Catchments Manager; Kataraina O'Brien - Director of Strategic Engagement (via Zoom); James Low – Team Leader Policy (Freshwater); James Dare - Environmental Scientist (Water Quality); Josie Crawshaw – Environmental Scientist (via Zoom); Mereana Toroa (via Zoom), Rawiri Bhana (via Zoom); Reuben Gardiner – Senior Planner (Water Policy) (via Zoom);; Claudia Cameron – Committee Advisor

WBOPDC: Peter Watson – Reserves and Facilities Manager

TCC: Radleigh Cairns – Environmental Programme Leader Infrastructure; Wally Potts – Acting Director of City Waters (via Zoom).

External:                                Presenters: Louise Saunders – CEO Manaaki Kaimai-Mamaku Trust; Kia Maia Ellis – Project Manager Tauranga Moana Iwi Customary Fisheries Trust (via Zoom); Elva Conroy – Consultant Planner (via Zoom); Chris Battershill – Toihuarewa, Takutai Chair in Coastal Sciences; Raul Galimidi – Senior Planning Engineer, Waters (TCC).

Ngā Hōnea

Apologies:                  Pia Bennett (Ngāi Te Rangi); Cr Grant Dally (WBOPDC); Te Pio Kawe (Ngāti Ranginui); Rehua Smallman (Ngāti Pūkenga).

For early departure: Cr Jane Nees (BOPRC), Commissioner Shadrach Rolleston(TCC); Commissioner Bill Wasley (TCC).

 

1.     Karakia Whakatuwhera
Opening Prayer

A karakia was provided by Charlie Tawhiao.

2.     Ngā Hōnea
Apologies

Resolved

That the Tauranga Moana Advisory Group:

1        Accepts the apologies from Pia Bennett, Cr Grant Dally, Te Pio Kawe and Rehua Smallman for absence; and from Cr Nees, Commissioner Rolleston and Commissioner Wasley for early departure tendered at the meeting.

McDonald/Dean

CARRIED

 

3.     Raupapa o Ngā Take
Order of Business

Members agreed to the reordering of items to accommodate an external presenter for item 9.3 “Waikato University Update: Changes in seagrass beds and modelling the impact of urban growth in Tauranga Moana catchments on the health of the harbour”.

4.     Whakapuakanga o Ngā Take Whai Taha-Rua
Declaration of Conflicts of Interest

·      Cr Norm Bruning: Item 10.1 Manaaki Kaimai-Mamaku Trust Kaupapa; declared an interest in his capacity as Co-Chair of the Kaimai Mamaku Trust

·      Cr Matemoana McDonald: Item 10.2 New Care Plan for Mauao and Strategy for Mauao Trust / Mauao Kaitiaki Group Update; declared an interest in her capacity as Chair of the Mauao Trust.

5.     Ngā Meneti
Minutes

Kia Whakaūngia Ngā Meneti
Minutes to be Confirmed

5.1

Tauranga Moana Advisory Group Minutes - 25 March 2022

 

Resolved

That the Tauranga Moana Advisory Group:

1.         Confirms the Tauranga Moana Advisory Group Minutes - 25 March 2022 as a true and correct record.

McDonald/Dean

CARRIED

 

6.     Ngā Whakamārama a Ngā Rōpu
Update from Partners

6.1    Ngāi Te Rangi

Ngāi Te Rangi Representative Charlie Tawhiao provided a verbal update:

Key Points:

·    Recognised delay in formalising this committee was a result of the delay in finalising the treaty settlement, but acknowledged progress on two fronts:

o At the Crown level - through Pia Bennett and Ngāi Te Rangi’s engagement with the Hauraki Iwi Collective and the Minister; and

o At an individual iwi level - through positive discussion with the constituent iwis of the Hauraki Iwi Collective

·    Some concern raised by hapū over proposed extension to the Port of Tauranga, with discussions taking place regarding the environmental impact. Pia Bennett was compiling evidence if required to present to court, although hoping for a mediative outcome.

Members comments:

·    Acknowledged the successful introduction and use of the tikanga process by the iwi of Tauranga Moana into the treaty process.

 

6.2    Ngāti Ranginui

Following an apology received from Ngāti Ranginui Representative Te Pio Kawe, update deferred to the next meeting.

 

6.3    Ngāti Pūkenga

Ngāti Pūkenga Representative Keepa Smallman provided a verbal update:

Key Points:

·    Ngāpeke land block development progress (Welcome Bay):

o Phase two of the weed suppression was underway and planting to commence in June, which was supported by BOPRC

o Archaeological investigations completed

o Soil testing was underway and an organic seaweed fertiliser plan being investigated

·    Awaiting sign off for proposed planting of vines.

 

6.4    Western Bay of Plenty District Council

WBOPDC Councillor Mark Dean provided a verbal update:

Key Points:

·    Progress was underway for desludging the Katikati waste water column; sludge has been pumped into geobags in a sealed wastewater pond with effluent pumped back into the treatment process. Once the sludge had dried sufficiently, it would be tested for suitability for composting

·    Ōmokoroa boat ramp repairs completed

·    Crown infrastructure partner funded project: the Rerewhakaaitu wastewater articulation project and connection to lower houses had been completed

·    Marae On Site Effluent Treatment (OSET) upgrade was near completion, with all Marae that requested an upgrade having received one, and Poututerangi Marae’s upgrade was currently underway

·    Water Sports and Recreation Facility Plan – asset list assessment was in progress

·    Ōmokoroa Cycle bridge was completed, but on-going works on the path meant it was currently closed.

Key Points - Members:

·    Complimented the design of the new Ōmokoroa playground

·    Acknowledged mahi of WBOPDC for their collaborative efforts to achieve the OSET upgrade projects.

 

6.5    Tauranga City Council

TCC Representative Radleigh Cairns provided a verbal update:

Key Points:

·    Waste water management – de-sludging to begin next month, increased monitoring of seepages during the process to ensure continued compliance with resource consents

·    Environmental Mitigation Enhancement Fund to open soon, applications to be  assessed by an independent panel

·    Upgrades underway at Te Manga wastewater treatment to manage continued growth

·    Noted the continued issue with wet wipes entering the wastewater network and highlighted the new flushability standard to be introduced. Voluntary scheme to provide clarity on testing required to establish product flushability, and a flushable symbol for packaging. TCC to engage with larger retailers and relaunch the ‘save our pipes from wipes’ campaign to raise awareness of new standard

·    Continued work to improve stormwater discharge into waterways and harbour through a monitoring and investigation programme, including stormwater treatment in new CBD roading upgrades, to reduce contaminant loads and monitor effectiveness of treatments

·    Kopurererua stream – southern stream realignment completed and southern wetland area was progressing. Excavation of the northern stream realignment was to begin later this year

·    Gordon Carmichael Reserve story board was currently with local hapū for consultation.

Key Points - Members:

·    Acknowledged the Canadian geese population growth in the Gordon Carmichael Reserve, and noted the success of the addling project from the previous year to control the geese population

·    Questioned public engagement options for storyboard project for the Gordon Carmichael Reserve

·    Pukehinahina Charitable Trust tree planting event was taking place in June 2022.

 

6.6    Bay of Plenty Regional Council

Toi Moana General Manager, Integrated Catchments Chris Ingle provided a verbal update:

Key Points:

·    Collaboration with TCC to investigate increased demand for private bores from homeowners in the Mount Maunganui/Pāpāmoa area. Increases in compliant new bores were less than 20/year in 2018, but this has increased to almost 100/year in 2022. This raised concern over the cumulative impact on the water take

·    There had been a recent prosecution of container storage facility (CRS Tauranga Ltd) for discharge of contaminated stormwater into Tauranga Moana. CRS Tauranga Ltd have offered to provide $50,000 of environmental enhancement work

·    Dairy effluent monitoring programme inspected 400 dairy farms, with non-compliance slightly higher this year. 2.5% were serious non-compliance issues requiring formal action, which had been taken. Follow up action to address the impact would be undertaken

·    Recent stormy weather had required increased responses from the Maritime Team

·    Identified the ongoing Athenree saltmarsh partnership in collaboration with WBOPDC, DOC, Waka Kotahi and local Tangata Whenua and the restoration and future management project of Tahataharoa in collaboration with WBOPDC, Pirirakau and consultants.

Key Points - Members:

·    Questioned the level of public maritime safety education, following a recent incident between a yacht and a ship.

Items for Staff Follow Up:

·      Maritime Team to provide a report to a future meeting of the Tauranga Moana Advisory Group on the following matters:

Responses to the recent stormy weather and vessel salvage

Maritime safety education report

 

7.     Ngā Whakamārama Te Papa Atawhai
Conservation Update

7.1    Department of Conservation

Presented by Jeff Milham, Pou Matarautaki/District Manager Te Papa.

Key Points:

·    Assistance was provided to Ngāi Te Rangi to identify potential impacts on marine mammals from the proposed Port of Tauranga development

·    Funding support was available for iwi and hapū kaupapa, including the Jobs for Nature Fund

·    Training was provided for hapū in partnership with other organisations, including Resource Management Act (RMA) training in conjunction with BOPRC

·    Noted the recent change in the political landscape with the appointment of a new Minister of Conservation, Hon Poto Williams

·    As a follow up from the previous meeting, as  many interested parties were wanting to conduct research on Great White sharks, a hui would take place to co-ordinate

·    Provided clarification over the relationship between DOC and Fish and Game, noted their legislative relationship but independence with separate structures and roles.

Key Points - Members:

·    Concern raised over potential lack of alignment of Fish and Game with Iwi partners in relationship to the use of the environment.

10:15 am The meeting adjourned.

10:30 am The meeting reconvened.

 

8.

 

Whakahoutanga Kōrero
Verbal Updates

8.1

Port of Tauranga Update

Item deferred to next meeting.

 

9.     Ngā Pūrongo
Reports

Hei Pānui Anake
Information Only

9.1

Essential Freshwater Policy Programme Update

Presented by James Low, BOPRC Team Leader Policy (Freshwater), and James Dare, BOPRC Environmental Scientist (Water Quality).

Key Points:

·      Update provided on progress with the Essential Freshwater Policy Programme (EFPP)

·      Demonstrated tools to develop visions for freshwater - Essential Freshwater Visions and Outcomes | Participate BOPRC

·      Public feedback was sought via the online tool to provide quantitative results based on values - participants who provided feedback could enter a draw to win a $200 gift voucher

·      Demonstrated the interactive Water Ecology Tool (WET) which provided access to water quality information from monitoring of Bay of Plenty rivers, groundwater and lakes: WET - Bay of Plenty Regional Council (shinyapps.io)

·      Data could be refined by indicator, freshwater management unit or rohe to view baseline states, current states, and trends - with public access to data on a user-friendly platform, and the ability to view multi-layer information, including raw data via excel

·      Encouraged members to access WET and provide feedback

·      Videos to demonstrate how to use WET were being considered

·      Confirmed WET aligned with the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management (NPSFM) workstream

·      Endeavoured to capture differences in visions between Freshwater Management Units (FMUs), although there would be some commonalities between FMUs.

Key Points - Members:

·      Questioned how use of the tool by the public would be recorded

·      Suggested making the tool more accessible to the public by developing a game element, similar to the prototype Marae-opoly adaption planning game

In Response to Questions:

·      At this stage WET did not encompass Mahinga Kai

·      Regarding WET’s potential use for multiple-owned Māori land in terms of best use for future development, WET could potentially provide contextual information about the state of the environment in that area only.

 

 

 

Resolved

That the Tauranga Moana Advisory Group:

1.        Receives the report, Essential Freshwater Policy Programme Update.

Wasley/Dean

CARRIED

 

10.   Whakaaturanga
Presentations

10.1

Manaaki Kaimai-Mamaku Trust Kaupapa

Presentation 1 - Louise Saunders: Manaaki Kaimai-Mamaku Trust Presentation - 17 June 2022: Objective ID A4119701   

Presented by: Louise Saunders, CEO Manaaki Kaimai-Mamaku Trust.

 

Key Points:

·      The key message was the health of the forest directly impacted Tauranga Moana – “fish need forests”

·      An overview of the whakapapa, role and key achievements of the Manaaki Kaimai-Mamaku Trust was provided, including:

Created a vision and mission to guide the mahi

Formed the Joint Agency Committee (BOPRC, Waikato Regional Council, DOC and Representatives of the Manaaki Kaimai-Mamaku Trust)

Protected the wide variety of species in the Kaimai-Mamaku ranges

Developed the Pest Control Management Document to improve methods and co-ordination between agencies

Produced the State of the Environment Report

Created Ngā Iwi Tōpū as a rōpū for iwi and hapū with mana whenua interests in the Kaimai Mamaku area, and Māori with an interest in the kaupapa, to share ideas and opportunities

Noted the change from a Forum to a Trust was to establish a formal entity which was required for funding eligibility, and to formalise the co-governance structure

Management was taken over by the Trust from Te Papa Atawhai on the 1st April 2022 which was identified as a key milestone

Secured funding from the Covid Recovery Package and Jobs for Nature, with $19.4 million received for restoration principally on public conservation land and through iwi and hapū led projects

Changed the kaupapa from just pest control to a more holistic conservation and restoration role

·      Key areas of focus were identified:

Projects, monitoring, relationships and communication

Improved the website and increased communication through a regular newsletter

Increased project efficiency, coordination and reporting, with a focus on conservation and employment outcomes and milestones, with cultural health and social indicators to be reported

Shared knowledge and collective action through Geographic Information System (GIS) database to connect projects and groups

·      Emphasised the importance of people re-engaging with the whenua. This increased individual’s wellbeing and gave benefits from collaboration, which provided momentum to projects

·      Where to from here:

Establish Monitoring Working Group to provide better data visibility and transparency

Ensure pest control methods remained effective

Increase use of Mātauranga Māori and development of measurable cultural health indicators

Increase community engagement, especially on the Waikato side – online engagement platform

Jobs For Nature ends in June 2024 – sources of long term funding needed to be secured. Focussed on the measurability of outcomes to ‘sell’ to potential funders through the GIS dashboard and data transparency.

Key Points - Members:

·      Commended the comprehensive update, passion and mahi for the project.

 

 

11:30am - Commissioner Shadrach Rolleston and Cr Jane Nees withdrew from the meeting.

 

10.2

New Care Plan for Mauao and Strategy for Mauao Trust / Mauao Kaitiaki Group Update

Presentation 2 - Elva Conroy: New Care Plan for Mauao and Strategy for Mauao Trust - 17 June 2022: Objective ID A4121536 

Presented by: Elva Conroy, Consultant Planner.

Presentation 3 - Kia Maia Ellis: Mauao Kaitiaki Group Update - 17 June 2022: Objective ID A4121548   

Presented by: Kia Maia Ellis, Kairangahau Phd Student at the University of Waikato/Project Manager Tauranga Moana Iwi Customary Fisheries Trust.

 

Key Points – Elva Conroy:

·      Introduced the 10 year strategy developed for the Mauao Trust as a care plan for Mauao - He Korowai Ariki o Mauao

·      The plan is an adaption of Sir Mason Durie's Te Whare Tapa Whā model with the 15 actions grouped into 5 key wellbeing focus areas for Mauao:

Te Tinana – physical wellbeing

§ Included planting, restoration and the long term aspiration of being predator free

Te Hinengaro – emotional and mental wellbeing

§ Ensured historical and cultural context of Mauao was strong and heritage sites were maintained

Te Wairua – spiritual wellbeing

§ The use of cultural practices and Mātauranga Māori in restoration projects

§ Mauao allowed appropriate time to rest

Te Whānau – connection to iwi and hapū

§ Whānau were able to demonstrate their role as kaitiaki through engagement projects, events and conservation training

Hautūtanga – governance

§ Included an appropriate allocation of resources for administrational support and regular meetings of the Mauao Trust

§ Financial sustainability through funding being secured.

 

Key Points – Kia Maia Ellis:

·      The  first project from the Mauao care plan was focussed on Te Tinana and Te Whānau

·      Mauao physical health check discovered mertyl rust:

On Pohutukawa trees on Mauao since April 2022 - emphasised that Pohutukawa were the Taonga of Mauao as they protected other species

Infected plants removed where people walk, as walkers were the assumed carriers of spores. This aimed to prevent spread to larger trees

·      Kaitiakitanga encouraged for Mauao’s wellbeing

·      Te Ao Māori perspective used in conjunction with a mertyl rust expert

·      Rangitahi group has been utilised to ensure active succession planning, focussed on training, surveillance and commitment

·      Needed more members of the active kaitiaki group trained to do the mahi of checking plants.

Key Points - Members:

·      Questioned whether local native seedlings were being used for planting on Mauao. The Matakana Nursery was identified as a primary source of plants, with schools involved with cultivating seedlings from Mauao

·      Background information was provided regarding the co-management of Mauao by the three iwi making up the Mauao Trust (Ngāi Te Rangi, Ngāti Ranginui and Ngāti Pūkenga) and TCC through Ngā Poutiriao ō Mauao

·      Emphasised the collaborative nature of the relationship between the Mauao Trust, Ngā Poutiriao ō Mauao and the Kaitiaki group being formed.

 

 

11:50 am – Commissioner Bill Wasley withdrew from the meeting.

 

10.3

Waikato University Update: Changes in Seagrass Beds and Modelling the Impact of Urban Growth in Tauranga Moana Catchments on the Health of the Harbour

Presentation 4 - Professor Chris Battershill: Changes in Seagrass Beds and Modelling the Impact of Urban Growth in Tauranga Moana Catchments and the Health of the Harbour - 17 June 2022: Objective ID A4121551   

Presented by: Professor Chris Battershill, Toihuarewa – Takutai Chair in Coastal Sciences - University of Waikato.

 

Key Points:

·      Identified the significant reduction in seagrass in Tauranga Moana and the entire moana was due to a variety of factors:

Marine heatwaves stressing the habitat

Fast changing marine environment which included disease and increased competition

Increased populations of black swan and Canadian geese

§ Consumption of seagrass by the birds had almost overtaken seagrass regrowth rate. Research would be undertaken and a humane mitigation method to reduce bird numbers and maintain a balance of species investigated

§ Appeared nitrogen produced by the birds had a negligible effect compared to nitrogen and phosphorus from rivers, although the effect of coliform production through faecal matter was still unknown, with research to be conducted

Land use changes had increased pollutants

Boats anchored on seagrass beds had caused damage, but more likely brought invasive species from other areas of Aotearoa. Future attention was needed around mooring sites

The potential environmental impact of dredging from the port company would be assessed via hearings

 

·      Introduced the Oranga Taiao Oranga Tāngata - Integrated Spatial Planning Tool (ISPT) which has been developed as a modelling tool from previous hydrology research. This assessed the effect of land use, climate change and other actions which impacted the environment

·      Future planning for land around Tauranga Moana would be aided by the modelling tool

·      Research specific to Tauranga Moana would be conducted and a report provided once scenarios had been run through the modelling tool. The accuracy of the modelling tool would be tested during the development of the Ngāti Pūkenga Ngāpeke block.

Key Points - Members:

·      Expressed concern that culling of birdlife should only be done after sufficient research and through a strictly evidence based approach. Information regarding the working group looking into the Canadian geese and black swan numbers was requested

·      Addressed the rate of urban growth of Tauranga and its potential negative impact on kai moana, in particular the loss of titiko and tuangi.

In response to questions:

·      Noted that continued urban development must be matched by improved practices to mitigate harm to Tauranga Moana

·      Recognised that some improvements were being seen, but were not keeping pace with the rate of development

A positive change in practice included algal scrubbing which used seaweed to strip nutrients from sewerage. A fully operational plant was operating in Te Puke and additional plants would be developed

·      Acknowledged the health of Tauranga Moana was fairly good considering it held the busiest commercial port in the country

·      More research was required to understand why certain kai moana species were not returning.

 

10.4

Tauranga City Council: Freshwater Management Tool

Presentation 5 - Raul Galimidi: Tauranga City Council Freshwater Management Tool - 17 June 2022: Objective ID A4121558   

Presented by: Raul Galimidi - Senior Planning Engineer Waters.

 

Key Points:

·      A brief overview of the remit of the City Waters team was provided:

Undertaking assessments of streams and identified areas vulnerable to erosion and other factors

Comprehensive flood modelling tool to inform city planning was being developed

·      Outlined the current Freshwater Management Tool project:

Software model was being developed to improve the understanding of groundwater and surface water interactions, and urban contaminants within the Tauranga district area

Value for money investment opportunities would be identified

The previous 15 years of data would be used to simulate the hydrology and water quality of run off, to predict the future state

Different scenarios and potential management interventions would be tested

·      Identified the key driver of the project:

Assisted the review of consents for water take and predicted water availability

Tested proposed water quality targets set by BOPRC and informed future target setting

Improved water quality management and city planning

·      Focussed on Tauranga urban stormwater area, and included the catchments that drained into them - not intended to link to harbour contaminant model at this stage

·      Early engagement with some Tauranga hapū had been conducted, with more engagement proposed.

Key Points - Members:

·      Emphasised the scope and complexity of the water space

·      Highlighted the potential for public confusion and stressed TCC, WBOPDC and BOPRC needed to work collaboratively before seeking community engagement.

 

 

11.   Rā Hui Whai Ake
Next Meeting Date

Friday 16 September 2022 at 09.30 am

12.   Karakia Kati
Closing Prayer

A karakia was provided by Charlie Tawhiao.

 

12:40 – the meeting closed.

 

 

Confirmed 16 September 2022                                                                                                    

                                                                                                                     Cr Matemoana McDonald

Chairperson, Tauranga Moana Advisory Group


 Regional Transport Committee Minutes

19 May 2022

 

Regional Transport Committee

Open Minutes

Commencing:             Thursday 19 May 2022, 9.30 am

Venue:                         Bay of Plenty Regional House Chambers, 1 Elizabeth Street, Tauranga and via Zoom (Audio Visual Meeting)

Chairperson:               Cr Lyall Thurston (Bay of Plenty Regional Council)

Deputy Chairperson:  Cr Jane Nees (Bay of Plenty Regional Council)

Members:                    Mayor Malcolm Campbell - Kawerau District Council, Deputy Mayor Faylene Tunui – Alternate, Kawerau District Council, Mayor Lyn Riesterer - Ōpōtiki District Council, David Speirs - Waka Kotahi, Angus Hodgson – Alternate, KiwiRail (non-voting)

Members (via Zoom): Mayor Garry Webber - Western Bay of Plenty District Council, Commissioner Stephen Selwood – Alternate, Tauranga City Council (partial attendance), Mayor Steve Chadwick - Rotorua Lakes Council, Cr David Moore - Alternate, Ōpōtiki District Council, Deputy Mayor Andrew Iles – Alternate, Whakatāne District Council

External Advisors:      Dan Kneebone – Port of Tauranga, Glen Crowther – Environmental Sustainability Advisor, John Galbraith (via Zoom) – Freight Advisor

In Attendance:            Cr Andrew von Dadelszen (via Zoom), Namouta Poutasi – General Manager, Strategy and Science, Presenters – as listed in the minutes, Amanda Namana – Committee Advisor

Apologies:                  Mayor Judy Turner - Whakatāne District Council, Commissioner Anne Tolley – Tauranga City Council, Helen Rogers – KiwiRail, Brent Crowe – New Zealand Police, Commissioner Selwood (for late arrival/early departure)

 

1.     Apologies 

Resolved

That the Regional Transport Committee:

1        Accepts the apologies from Mayor Judy Turner, Commissioner Anne Tolley, Helen Rogers, Brent Crowe and Commissioner Selwood (for late arrival and early departure) tendered at the meeting.

Thurston/Nees

CARRIED

2.     Public Forum

None

3.     Order of Business

Item 6.1 Chairperson’s report would be taken in two parts to accommodate the availability of Commissioner Selwood for Items 6.2 and 6.3.

4.     Declaration of Conflicts of Interest

None declared.

5.     Minutes

Minutes to be Confirmed

5.1

Regional Transport Committee Minutes - 15 March 2022

 

Resolved

That the Regional Transport Committee:

1        Confirms the Regional Transport Committee Minutes - 15 March 2022 as a true and correct record.

Chadwick/Nees

CARRIED

 

6.     Reports

 

6.1

Chairperson's Report

Tabled Document 1 - Emissions Reduction Plan - Key Transport Targets and Goals: Objective ID A4106209 

Presentation: Emissions Reduction Plan: Objective ID A4106212   

 

Team Leader – Transport and Urban Strategy Lorraine Cheyne presented this item (via Zoom), supported by General Manager, Strategy and Science, Namouta Poutasi.

Key Points:

·        Glen Crowther – Environmental Sustainability Advisor presented Tabled Document 1.  This document was compiled from the table of actions in the Emissions Reduction Plan (ERP), specific to matters of interest from a Regional Transport Committee (RTC) perspective, in a more chronological sequence than the ERP

·        The ERP was unique as this was the first time a whole of government approach to climate change had been reached and all core government  responsibilities were woven together throughout

·        The graph on ERP presentation slide four showed how each focus area had influence in the reduction of emissions over the various budgets, and demonstrated the increasing significance of the role of transport emissions reductions to the overall reduction of emissions across the three budgets.

Key Points - Members:

·        The ERP needed to be analysed to ensure targets were correct at a local level and to identify if anything had been missed from a regional approach

·        Expressed concern that the scrap-and-replace trial would still be beyond the means of many rural low income households and other options may need to be considered

·        The focus should be on emissions reduction, not reducing vehicle kilometres.

In Response to Questions:

·        As the ERP had only just become available, analysis was still underway on the document and its implications.  May need to ensure the reduction of Vehicle Kilometres Travelled (VKT) work was aligned and on track.  Further analysis on VKT reduction for the region and economic implications needed

·        The focus for lower income households would be on the scrap-and-replace trial  - it had not been specified whether this would include rural and urban households.

 

Item for Staff Follow Up:

·        Review the ERP and analyse the implications to the Regional Transport Committee, then report back, in the interim circulate a summary.

 

9.30 am - Commissioner Selwood entered the meeting.

 

6.2

Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency Quarterly Update - May 2022

Presentation: Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency Quarterly Update: Objective ID A4108362   

Director Regional Relationships David Speirs presented this item.

Key Points:

·        Provided an update on the new regulatory funding model and the 30-Year Plan: Baseline Network Version (the digital tool was now operative - launched 14 March 2022)

·        The Business Case Refresh was strongly informed by feedback from key stakeholders.  This was principles based for developing business cases, rather than regulatory based.  Urged members to view the proposed changes as input was still required and some of these needed to be tested with stakeholders

·        The employment initiative launched through the New Zealand Upgrade Programme (NZUP) was proving successful

·        Bilingual traffic and school signs were beginning to be rolled out across the country – the process had been made lengthy by detailed requirements of what signs can and cannot have

·        The Setting of Speed Limits 2022 rule took effect today and introduced the concept of a regional speed management plan on a three year cycle, this process would be coordinated by the RTC and a Regional Speed Management Plan must be set

·        Construction on the new Wairoa Road bridge would begin at the end of the month

·        A challenge with Takitimu North Stage 2 was the freshwater species present along the route, which impacted the schedule

·        Encouraged the public to take advantage of the Eastern Link Toll Road waiving tolls from 4-7 pm Monday to Friday for the next three weeks on westbound lanes.

Key Points - Members:

·        Expressed frustration around current business case processes and hoped that having the strategic alignments would add credibility, with the amendments expediting the process.

in Response to Questions:

·        For cost and practicality reasons, it was intended that bilingual signage would be rolled out nationally as new signs were required or needed replacing

·        The changes to driver licencing fees was to be implemented as soon as possible

·        Waka Kotahi were supportive of a circular economy and alternative resources, and were working with Tūhoe on trials for their green road concept

·        Legibility of the bilingual signs was important – to ensure this, the text remained the same size and the overall size of the sign was increased.

 

Resolved

That the Regional Transport Committee:

1        Receives the report, Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency Quarterly Update - May 2022.

Speirs/Thurston

CARRIED

Decisions Required

6.3

RLTP Variation - Western Corridor Growth Management – Tauriko West DBC [Enabling Works]

Senior Transport Planner Andrew Williams presented this item (via Zoom).

Key Points - Members:

·        Endorsed this variation and underlined the criticality from a provision of housing perspective

·        Considered that this was an unintended consequence of focusing on emissions instead of roading to meet communities housing requirements

·        Funding toward emissions reduction for public transport services would be contingent on having the services available from the beginning.

In Response to Questions:

·        The majority of funding for this activity would come from Waka Kotahi, which meant a reallocation of projects across the priority list in the National Land Transport Programme (NLTP), not specifically in the Bay of Plenty.

 

Resolved

That the Regional Transport Committee:

1        Receives the report, RLTP Variation - Western Corridor Growth Management – Tauriko West DBC [Enabling Works];

2        Notes that the proposed variation to the Bay of Plenty Regional Land Transport Plan 2021-31 to enable the inclusion of a property phase to the activity:  Western Corridor Growth Management – Tauriko West DBC [Enabling Works], triggers the Regional Land Transport Plan’s significance policy; and

3        Approves the proposed variation to the Bay of Plenty Regional Land Transport Plan 2021-31 to enable the inclusion of a property phase to the activity:  Western Corridor Growth Management – Tauriko West DBC [Enabling Works], and in doing so, exercises its right to determine that the variation is non-significant for the purposes of public consultation.

Webber/Nees

CARRIED

 

10.38 am – Commissioner Selwood withdrew from the meeting.

 

10.45 am – The meeting adjourned.

 

11:04 am – The meeting resumed.

 

6.4

Chairperson's Report (Continued)

Presentation: Western Bay of Plenty Operational Road Safety Group: Objective ID A4110578   

 

Key Points:

·        Provided an update of the status of Infrastructure Acceleration Fund (IAF) applications that the RTC endorsed in December 2021:

o   Ōpōtiki District Council – at a sensitive stage of negotiations, a public statement to be released soon

o   Tauranga City Council – of the four applications made, two had been approved in principle subject to no negotiation (Tauriko West and Te Papa)

o   Western Bay of Plenty District Council – application had progressed to the next stage for roading improvements at the State Highway (SH) 2/Ōmōkoroa intersection

o   Rotorua Lakes Council – the request for stormwater infrastructure to support transport infrastructure and enable housing intensification was through to the negotiation stage

·        Rotorua Lakes Council Safer Journeys Coordinator Helen van Beek provided an update (via Zoom) and video of practical driving programme initiative Driver Directions:

o   (204) Driver Directions - A free course to upskill young drivers - YouTube

o   This programme had evolved from a previously theory based programme, with funding from Waka Kotahi

o   There were seven one-day courses held per year during school holidays, with qualified driving instructors, volunteers from the Rotary Club and NZ Police.  Students attended with the caregiver teaching them to drive and the vehicle they were learning in.  Covered a wide range of skills including car maintenance, cyclists and truck experiences on the road, braking safely, reversing, parallel parking and safe following distances

·        Tauranga City Council Travel Safe Team Leader Sonia Lynds provided an update (via Zoom) on behalf of the Western Bay of Plenty Road Safety Group:

o   Collaboration with traffic safety engineers across councils and with Waka Kotahi, NZ Police and ACC was highly valued

o   Promotions were aimed toward all ages, with some focus on younger age groups, cyclists and vulnerable road/footpath users

o   Two-day young drivers workshops were held over school holidays covering topics such as heavy vehicle education and driver behaviour

o   Relationships with primary and secondary schools were important in keeping road safety top of mind

o   There was a strong focus on cycling safety and skills for all ages.

Key Points - Members:

·        Commended the work of the Drivers Direction course and the volunteers/service groups involved

·        The ‘boy racer’ issue was becoming increasingly dangerous, especially in rural areas

·        Expressed concern over vulnerable infrastructure and requested a submission be made by the RTC on the National Adaptation Plan.

 

In Response to Questions:

·        There were many elements that prioritised roads within the National Adaptation Plan and different interventions being worked through.

Resolved

That the Regional Transport Committee:

1        Receives the report, Chairperson's Report.

Thurston/Nees

CARRIED

 

 

6.5

Eastern Districts and Rotorua Lake District Travel Demand Management (TDM) Programme Scoping Studies

Transport and Urban Planning Manager James Llewellyn presented this item (via Zoom).

Key Points:

·        This started the process in understanding how people currently travel, particularly when they are using single occupancy cars and how this behaviour may be changed in the future

·        TDM aimed to understand people’s needs in a variety of contexts including geographic, social and cultural

·        TDM was also supportive of infrastructure investments and service delivery

·        Scoping studies for Rotorua and Eastern Bay of Plenty had been completed, Western Bay of Plenty scoping study would be complete by the end of July 2022.

In Response to Questions:

·        A prioritised implementation plan included costs and an action plan/timeframes will form next steps following the finalisation of the study

·        This work was strongly supportive of all work underway through the Transport System Plan (TSP), and was intended to underpin this, rather than replace it.

 

Resolved

That the Regional Transport Committee:

1        Receives the report, Eastern Districts and Rotorua Lake District Travel Demand Management Programme Scoping Studies;

2        Receives the draft Travel Demand Management Scoping Studies for the Eastern Districts and Rotorua Lakes District

(a)    Notes that a partner prioritised implementation plan will be prepared to   be considered through respective organisations decision making processes;   

(b) Notes that once the implementation plan is completed, further   consideration of implementation activities will occur through future annual plan and long term plan processes;

3        Notes that the Western Bay Scoping Study is underway; and

4        Agrees that the Travel Demand Management programme is within the scope of the Committee’s Terms of Reference.

Chadwick/Riesterer

CARRIED

 

 

 

6.6

New Zealand Freight and Supply Chain Issues Paper

Presentation: NZ Freight and Supply Chain Issues Paper: Objective ID A4106286   

Senior Transport Planner Matthew Kilpatrick presented this item (via Zoom).

Key Points:

·        The Port of Tauranga was the key driver of freight activity and goods movement, and the largest export port in New Zealand

·        Annual traffic volumes in Tauranga had increased by 8%, impacting the movement of freight and goods on key corridors.

Key Points - Members:

·        More updated information was available from the Port of Tauranga Annual Report June 2021.  Noted that coastal shipping was less restrictive than that stated on Page 212 of the agenda

·        An important part of reducing CO2 emissions for the Port was for the planned berth extension to occur, which would allow larger vessels and the implementation of electric cranes

·        Important to note that a central government decision around the future of the Ports of Auckland was due to be made in 2023

·        Freight movements in the region would continue to increase and understanding resilience on road and coastal shipping networks was fundamental

·        Raised the importance of the East Coast Main Trunk as a key issue for strategic investment that needed to be made sooner rather than later.

 

Items for Staff Follow Up:

·        Seek Port of Tauranga input into the submission prior to finalisation.

 

Resolved

That the Regional Transport Committee:

1        Receives the report, New Zealand Freight and Supply Chain Issues Paper;

2        Endorses the formal submission attached which outlines a general support on the paper, including the following amendments:

·       Emphasise the importance of the Port of Tauranga;

·       Link the Rail Network Investment Programme and rail opportunities including electrification;

·       Ensuring route security and the impact of road safety, and

·       Link to Ōpōtiki Harbour Transformation and Kawerau Inland Terminal;

3        Delegates authority to the Chair to sign off the final amended version of the submission.

Webber/Chadwick

CARRIED

 

Information Only

6.7

Draft Regional Public Transport Plan

Transport and Urban Planning Manager James Llewellyn presented this item.

In Response to Questions:

·        The Regional Public Transport Plan set the long term vision and policies for public transport across the region in the next ten years.  Various sub-regional partnerships (e.g. TSP) would then take this work and establish how the policies would be implemented - business cases, network refreshes etc

·        Any business case that came through the TSP would have a strategic case associated with it, which would be cognisant of all existing policies at a national, regional and local level, therefore providing sufficient opportunity for consistency to be delivered through the process.

 

 

Resolved

That the Regional Transport Committee:

1        Receives the report, Draft Regional Public Transport Plan;

2        Notes that the draft document has been developed in a manner consistent with the broader transport policy direction in the Bay of Plenty Regional Land Transport Plan 2021-31.

Thurston/Nees

CARRIED

 

 

6

Verbal Update Opportunity from Committee Members and Advisors

 

Key Points:

           Glen Crowther – Environmental Sustainability Advisor

·        A key contextual issue in the ERP was that although it presented a significant change with a broad scope, internationally it did not measure up.

Mayor Riesterer – Ōpōtiki District Council

·        Noted that the population of Ōpōtiki was now over 10,000, a recognisable milestone.

Mayor Campbell and Deputy Mayor Faylene Tunui – Kawerau District Council

·        Were still waiting for 70 km/hr signs requested for SH34 through Kawerau district

·        Raised an issue with the new two-lane roundabout where irresponsible drivers were attempting to race trucks around it

·        Encouraged by the driver safety operations in Rotorua and Western Bay of Plenty

·        Highlighted the increasing need for another bridge in Whakatāne

·       The TDM did not take into consideration the movement of people in and out of Kawerau and were interested in discovering how, why and where from/to that people were travelling

·       Requested further input into the TDM and discussions with Kawerau DC staff and Councillors prior to finalising.

Deputy Mayor Andrew Iles – Whakatāne District Council

·       Route security was vital for freight traffic travelling through the Eastern Bay of Plenty and the deterioration of highways was significant, with surface repairs not addressing the issues.

Mayor Chadwick – Rotorua Lakes Council

·        Advised of another new product for a circular economy – crushed glass which could be used for pathways etc.  A trial was underway and these types of options should be considered

·        Commended the driver licensing affordability changes as having a license was a passport to work and wellbeing for young people in rural areas

Cr Nees – Bay of Plenty Regional Council

·        Acknowledged the new Trust set up which Deputy Mayor Iles was involved with, and the positive rural transport options being considered

·        Consultation continued on the Rotorua Network Refresh

·        On-demand trial in Tauranga was being rescoped and expected to be returned to the Public Transport Committee in September 2022

·        A bus decarbonisation feasibility study was underway

·        There was funding in the Annual Plan for a Bay of Plenty transport reduction plan, which would be assisted by some of the TDM work

·        Free fare trials for youth had been reduced to only on school days/around school hours to address antisocial behaviour issues in the Tauranga bus network.  A wider taskforce approach had also been suggested.

 

12.37 pm – the meeting closed.

 

 

Confirmed 19 September 2022                                                                                                    

                                                                                                                                   Cr Lyall Thurston

Chairperson, Regional Transport Committee


 Ōhiwa Harbour Implementation Forum Minutes

26 April 2022

 

Ōhiwa Harbour Implementation Forum

Ngā Meneti

Open Minutes

Commencing:             Tuesday 26 April 2022, 9.30 am

Venue:                         The Board Room, Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Awa, 4-10 Louvain Street, Whakatāne

Heamana

Chairperson:               Cr Toi Kai Rākau Iti - Bay of Plenty Regional Council

Heamana Tuarua

Deputy Chairperson:  Mayor Lyn Riesterer - Ōpōtiki District Council

Ngā Kopounga

Members:                    Charlie Bluett - Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Awa, Trevor Ransfield - Te Upokorehe, Deputy  Mayor Andrew Iles – Whakatāne District Council, Karen Mokomoko - Whakatōhea Māori Trust Board, Cr Bill Clark, Alternate – Bay of Plenty Regional Council

Te Hunga i Tae Ake

In Attendance:                  Bay of Plenty Regional Council: Pim de Monchy – Coastal Catchments Manager, Tim Senior – Land Management Officer, Stacey Faire – Senior Planner, Coastal (via Zoom), all presenters – as listed in the minutes, Amanda Namana – Committee Advisor

Ngā Hōnea

Apologies:                  Tu O'Brien - Alternate, Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Awa, Cr Debi Hocart – Alternate, Ōpōtiki District Council

 

1.     Karakia Whakatuwhera
Opening Karakia

A karakia was provided by Charlie Bluett.

2.     Whakahoutanga Kōrero
Verbal Updates

2.1

Chairperson's Report

Chair Cr Toi Kai Rākau Iti acknowledged the passing of Whakatōhea member, Josie Mortensen and her strong contribution to the Forum.

Trevor Ransfield – Te Upokorehe paid tribute to Josie, recognising her commitment to the community and her significant lifetime achievements.

3.     Ngā  Hōnea
Apologies

Resolved

That the Ōhiwa Harbour Implementation Forum:

1        Accepts the apologies from Cr Debi Hocart and Tu O’Brien tendered at the meeting.

Bluett/Riesterer

CARRIED

4.     Ngā Take Tōmuri
Items not on the Agenda

·           New appointment of Whakatōhea Māori Trust Board member to the Ōhiwa Harbour Implementation Forum.

            Resolved

That the Ōhiwa Harbour Implementation Forum:

1       Accepts the late item, appointment of the member for Whakatōhea Māori Trust Board

2        Agrees that the item cannot be delayed as the information has only just become available and cannot wait until the next meeting.

Riesterer/Iles

CARRIED    

5.     Raupapa o Ngā Take
Order of Business

Item 10 – Consideration of items not on the agenda was taken immediately following Item 4, in order to officially endorse the new Whakatōhea member prior to any further business.

6.     Ngā Take Tōmuri Hei Whakaaroaro
Consideration of Items not on the Agenda

         Resolved

That the Ōhiwa Harbour Implementation Forum:

1        Endorses the appointment of Karen Mokomoko as the primary member for Whakatōhea Māori Trust Board to the Ōhiwa Harbour Implementation Forum.

Iles/Ransfield

CARRIED

7.     Whakapuakanga o Ngā Take Whai Taha-Rua
Declaration of Conflicts of Interest

None declared

8.     Ngā Meneti
Minutes

Kia Whakaūngia Ngā Meneti
Minutes to be Confirmed

8.1

Ōhiwa Harbour Implementation Forum Minutes - 12 November 2021

Matters Arising

In relation to Minute Item 6.6, Resolution 3; Coastal Catchments Manager Pim de Monchy advised members that a letter had not been written to Fish and Game New Zealand as this was no longer required.  Investigation of Fish and Game regulations clarified that in addition to the late February special season for hunting black swan, they were considered a game bird and as such could also be hunted during Game Bird Season.

 

Resolved

That the Ōhiwa Harbour Implementation Forum:

1        Confirms the Ōhiwa Harbour Implementation Forum Minutes - 12 November 2021 as a true and correct record.

Iles/Ransfield

CARRIED

 

9.     Ngā Pūrongo
Reports

Hei Pānui Anake
Information Only

9.1

Ōhiwa website development

Dr. Tanja Rother, PhD - Shared Landscapes – Intercultural Research & Engagement Services presented this item (via Zoom).

Key Points:

·        Demonstrated the website’s tabs and features and outlined content:  Home | Ohiwaharbour (hello66411.wixsite.com)

·        There were future opportunities for the website to become more interactive and inclusive of the wider Ōhiwa community, including an archive of the Ōhiwa Harbour Strategy and related documents.

Key Points - Members:

·        Commended the visual aspects of the website

·        Making the website bilingual was an important step, although the cost was likely to be significant and funding needed to be addressed

·        Add a Rāhui component to the website to help people understand the concept and implications of when this was in place

·        Requested a presentation be made to Upokorehe, Whakatōhea, and Ngāti Awa so that mana whenua were included and had a good understanding of the website which would also add value to other initiatives in the future.

 

 

Resolved

That the Ōhiwa Harbour Implementation Forum:

1        Receives the report, Ōhiwa website development;

2        Endorses the public release of the Ōhiwa website, once the presentation has also been made to ngā hapū, ngā iwi;

3        Endorses the ongoing content development of the Ōhiwa website.

Bluett/Riesterer

CARRIED

 

9.2

Nukuhou Water Quality Summary

Presentation: Nukuhou Water Quality Summary: Objective ID A4090035   

Environmental Scientist (Water Quality) James Dare presented this item.

Key Points:

·       Explained trend analysis as it related to data around Nukuhou water quality

·        Outlined short , medium  and long term trends, their benefits and how the data was used

·        Explained the gradient of stability and the positives/negatives which needed to be taken into account

·        Nukuhou catchment contaminants were reducing in magnitude over time, therefore overall the water quality was gradually improving

·       Faecal contamination and sediment were of the highest concern.

Key Points - Members:

·       Agreed that receiving both sets of information (medium and long term data) was important to see the long term picture as well as identifying what required more immediate attention

·       Improved results were expected to be observed once Farm Management Plans (FMPs) were all in place (by 2025).

In Response to Questions:

·       Abnormal rainfall would likely cause more mobilisation (e.g. flushing of nitrogen causing higher loads), the effect of which would depend on how the catchment responded to elevated flows

·       Gaps in the first portions of each graph were potentially due to resourcing issues at the time of the data collection

·       Every catchment that was part of the environmental monitoring network was included in the comparison data.

In Response to Questions (Pim de Monchy – Coastal Catchments Manager):

·       Catchment Land Use for Environmental Sustainability (CLUES) Modelling and more recently, SedNet modelling had taken place in the Ōhiwa catchment

·       The underlying assumptions in the CLUES modelling were that exotic forestry on steep country (as opposed to pastural grazing) would reduce E-Coli and nitrogen losses, and over the long term would generally reduce phosphorous and sediment losses.  This was providing that there was no large rainfall event during the first two years after harvesting

·       Slash management was a separate issue for which there continued to be room for improvement, but advising at the time of planting was important to determine where to plant, skid site locations, offsets and slash management opportunities

·       Although there was still some pinus radiata forestry in the catchment, there was significantly less than there used to be.

 

Items for Staff Follow Up:

·        Provide statistics and information about land use and farming change in the Nukuhou catchment to a future meeting.

 

Resolved

That the Ōhiwa Harbour Implementation Forum:

1        Receives the report, Nukuhou Water Quality Summary.

Iles/Riesterer

CARRIED

 

10:40 am  - The meeting adjourned.

 

11:02 am – The meeting reconvened.

 

9.3

Improving the quality of freshwater in the Ōhiwa catchment

Presentation: Improving quality of freshwater in Ōhiwa catchment: Objective ID A4090037

Land Management Officer Tim Senior presented this item.

Key Points:

·       Highlighted where the majority of sediment in the Ōhiwa catchment originated from, namely land slips caused by major rain events

·       Although some of this could not be prevented, there were measures that could be taken to potentially mitigate small slips on steep slopes, including planting trees such as poplars on gradient land to assist in holding it back.  This issue could also be addressed through farm management practices

·       Whilst it could be determined where these issues were likely to occur, Council did not have authority to enforce change, although it may be addressed through FMPs.  All these measures were currently voluntary on behalf of the landowners

·       Options/techniques needed to be developed for how to manage the issue of high, steep river banks as simply planting natives was not a viable solution (these would get washed away in a rainfall event)

·       Dead trees, particularly old willows, were falling into the river, forcing water to be pushed into the banks and exacerbating the problem

·       Shrub Willows were being planted to stabilise riverbanks as they had the advantage of a large root base and did not fall into the river, taking the bank with them

·       Rock was another option which had been successful in holding banks up (and vegetation would eventually grow between), but this was expensive

·       Surface run off accounted for approximately 10% of sediment that entered Ōhiwa Harbour

·       Wet, boggy areas were valuable for trapping sediment and nutrients but were generally unpopular on farms as it reduced the potential for grazing - it was hoped that this type of issue would be addressed through the new FMP rules.

Key Points - Members:

·        Reiterated the importance of the Forum with regard to making clear, well-reasoned submissions to future plans

·        Consolidation/amalgamation of farming properties could create further ongoing impacts with unintended consequences e.g. longer races.

In Response to Questions:

·        There was increasing awareness from farmers of what was needed to increase water quality, although at different rates.  Generally dairy farms were becoming less intensified and looking for productivity versus profit - less stock could be managed for less input without decreasing profits

·        ‘Riparian planting’ refers to planting on all waterways, including rivers, streams and drains.

 

Resolved

That the Ōhiwa Harbour Implementation Forum:

1        Receives the report, Improving the quality of freshwater in the Ōhiwa catchment.

Iles/Riesterer

CARRIED

 

9.4

Essential Freshwater Policy Programme Update and Visions

Presentation: Ōhiwa Harbour Implementation Forum visions and EFPP: Objective ID A4090038   

Senior Planners (Water Policy) Gemma Moleta and Reuben Gardiner presented this item.

Key Points:

·       Outlined the National Objectives Framework, under the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management (NPS-FM)

·       Explained what Vision under the NPS-FM meant for Ōhiwa Harbour and the process for establishing this

·       Online engagement was underway, with more intensive engagement planned for 2023 - once there was a clearer idea of rules, targets and implications for landowners

·       Clarified that engagement with forums and co-governance groups was not a proxy for engagement with iwi/hapū

·       The example vision had been taken from key goals/vision for the Ōhiwa Harbour Strategy.  Noted key aspects of this:

o   Acknowledged that the harbour was also important to the Freshwater Management Unit (FMU) as its receiving environment;

o   the importance of sustaining the lives of future generations;

o   the purpose of water quantity and water quality;

o   healthy and abundant mahinga kai;

o   reducing sediment;

o   protecting sites of cultural significance and protecting the mauri.

Key Points - Members:

·       Acknowledged that this was a unique opportunity to influence the plan which set the rules, with a firm focus on the needs of Ōhiwa

·       Supported having a combined iwi hui on the long term vision for the FMU, as well as holding a workshop for the Forum members.

In Response to Questions:

·        Starting points for the visions were very different within the thirteen FMUs, Ōhiwa Harbour had a shared benefit of already having a strategy in place, therefore a strong direction to start from

·        It was also important to check that the goals set in the Ōhiwa Harbour Strategy were the same ones the Forum wished to bring forward in this opportunity.

 

Items for Staff Follow Up:

·        Arrange a separate workshop with Care Groups from the Ōhiwa rohe, so they were also included on a wider engagement of what was underway in this space.

 

Resolved

That the Ōhiwa Harbour Implementation Forum:

1        Receives the report, Essential Freshwater Policy Programme Update and Visions;

2        Agrees to participate in a workshop on this topic as soon as practicable.

Iti/Riesterer

CARRIED

 

9.5

Update on the Ohiwa Harbour Awhi Mai Awhi Atu, Sustainable Seas, National Science Challenge project April 2022

Presentation: Awhi Mai Awhi Atu: Objective ID A4094889   

Waikato University Associate Professor Dr Kura Paul-Burke and PhD student Megan Ranapia presented this item.

Key Points:

·        The Awhi Mai Awhi Atu project was well ahead of the planned schedule, noted that the project was funded from 2019 until June 2023

·        In 2019, K4 was the last traditional mussel bed remaining in the harbour, with approximately 78,000 mussels

·        In 2021, the mussel population had grown to approximately 745,000 mussels throughout the harbour

·        A strong measure of success would be if K1 and K2 beds were still there in the future

·        In January 2022, tuangi (cockles) and pipi surveys were undertaken in the harbour and 5 million tuangi were estimated on the western side.  Results confirmed they were smaller than they used to be, which could be contributed to a number of factors

·        An unexpected titikō (mud snail) bed was also discovered, along with an estimated 300 tipa (scallops) and 20 hururoa (horse mussels)

·        Hururoa helped clean the water and had increasingly thin shells due to higher acidity in the water.  Recreational dredging had detrimental impacts on tipa and hururoa, causing population decline across the country

·        Seastar management trials showed that they were still reproducing and recruiting in the harbour

·        Different removal methods were being considered including trapping, diver removal and a combined approach

·        Seastar sampling had been completed and lab testing showed encouraging results for marine protein, which was important for skin and bones.  Using them as food for worm farms were also being considered as an option.

Key Points - Members:

·        Commended how much had been accomplished in increasing shellfish numbers in such a short period of time

·        Upokorehe opened pipi beds for gathering one at a time to ensure sustainability

·        Suggested a relationship be built within the Forum between the science, Ministry for Primary Industries and iwi/hapū for the purposes of growing and protecting the taonga

·        For the 186A Application for Rāhui, there was a set timeframe of a two year minimum whereas customary methods could choose a timeframe

·        It was important to show that a successful way of regenerating shellfish had been made, whilst protecting specific locations.

In Response to Questions:

·       Rāhui was an important short term marine management tool to replenish shellfish and consider action.

Staff In Response to Questions:

·        Working together with Kura and her team to understand requirements of ongoing management priorities and the next generation of research for Ōhiwa Harbour’s marine ecology restoration would be important to identify funding opportunities to implement these.

 

Resolved

That the Ōhiwa Harbour Implementation Forum:

1        Receives the report, Update on the Ohiwa Harbour Awhi Mai Awhi Atu, Sustainable Seas, National Science Challenge project April 2022.

Iles/Ransfield

CARRIED

 

9.6

Work Programme report to 31 March 2022 and proposed work programme for 2022/23

Land Management Officer Tim Senior presented this item.

Key Points:

·        Fish passage barriers in the Ōhiwa catchment had been researched to identify which ones were preventing migration of the freshwater fish

·        eDNA samples had been collected to understand more about which fish were in the catchment and their locations. This data would be analysed for the purposes of stream restoration. 

·        There was a large body of work suggested for 2023 to finish fish barrier assessments and undertake further eDNA work before fixing the barriers.

Key Points - Members:

·        Commended the forward progress of the Forum and the opportunity to be involved in such a positive shift over time, finding solutions for the greater good of Ōhiwa

·        An adaptive and flexible rāhui management plan needed to be considered going forward, to align with science and mātauranga Māori to create a cohesive system that was responsive to the environment and worked for the benefit of all.

 

 

Resolved

That the Ōhiwa Harbour Implementation Forum:

1        Receives the report, Work Programme report to 31 March 2022 and proposed work programme for 2022/23;

2        Endorses the proposed 2022-23 annual work programme.

Riesterer/Ransfield

CARRIED

 

6.     Karakia Kati
Closing Karakia

A karakia was provided by Charlie Bluett.

 

12:58 pm – the meeting closed.

 

 

Confirmed 8 September 2022                                                                                                      

                                                                                                                               Cr Toi Kai Rākau Iti

Chairperson, Ōhiwa Harbour Implementation Forum


Regional Council                                                                                              29 September 2022

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Report To:

Regional Council

Meeting Date:

29 September 2022

Report Authoriser:

Doug Leeder

 

 

Chairperson's Report

 

 

 

Executive Summary

Since the preparation of the previous Chairperson’s Report (for the 11 August 2022 Council meeting) I have attended and participated in a number of meetings and engagements as Chairperson on behalf of the Bay of Plenty Regional Council (BOPRC).

This report sets out those meetings and engagements, outside of Council, Committee and Sub-Committee meetings, and highlights key matters of interest that I wish to bring to Councillors’ attention.

 

Recommendations

That the Regional Council:

1        Receives the report, Chairperson's Report.

 

1.        Purpose

The purpose of this report is to update Council on meetings and engagements, outside of Council, Committee and Sub-Committee meetings, I have attended and participated in as Chairperson. Also, to highlight key matters that will be of interest to Councillors.

The following section summarises these meetings and engagements. I will provide further detail at the meeting in response to any questions you may have.

 

 

2.        Meetings and Engagements

 

Date

Meeting / Engagement

Comment

8 August

Institute of Directors Forum Discussion - Whakatane

The topic for this forum was “Climate Change in the Eastern Bay - what are the consequences for governance?”

12 August

Hosted visit from Hawkes Bay Regional Council Chair and Councillors – Tauranga

Discussed our major priorities and activities in the Bay of Plenty region.

Scott Hamilton, Chief Executive Quayside Holdings Ltd also gave a presentation.

19 August

Tangihanga for Ta Toby Curtis - Tapuaekura Marae

Attended. 

22 August

Dinner with Rotorua Lakes Council Mayor Steve Chadwick, Western Bay of Plenty District Council Mayor Gary Webber, and Tauranga City Council Commissioner Chair Anne Tolley – Rotorua

An opportunity to farewell outgoing Rotorua Lakes Council Mayor Steve Chadwick.

23 August

Meeting with Dairy NZ – Hamilton

Discussed how we can work together on water issues and a brief overview of He waka eke noa.  Waikato Regional Council and other organisations also in attendance.

24 August

Bay of Plenty Local Government Forum Resource Management Reform – Tauranga

Ministry for the Environment officials in attendance to share where decisions have landed on key components of the reform and to understand our current thinking on the reforms.

26 August

Meeting with Riverside Drive residents – Whakatāne

Discussed flood management assets protecting their properties.  

31 August

Parliamentary Services Select Committee: Water Services Entities Bill submission - Videoconference

Presented as Regional Sector Chair.

2 September

National Council meeting – Wellington

Attended.

4 September

2022 Zespri AIMS Games VIP Function and Opening Ceremony – Mount Maunganui

Attended.

5 September

Minister for the Environment Hon David Parker meeting with the Mayoral Forum – Videoconference

The Minister spoke about the Resource Management reforms.

9 September

Memorial Service for Jacqui Hughes – Whakatāne

Spoke on behalf of Regional Council, Jacqui was a previous elected member of Bay of Plenty Regional Council. 

14 September

Official Opening of Waihau Bay St John Ambulance Station – Opotiki

Spoke on behalf of Bay of Plenty Regional Council. Funding provided by Council.

16 September

Farewell event for Rotorua Lakes Council outgoing Mayor Steve Chadwick and Deputy Mayor Dave Donaldson – Rotorua

Attended.

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

Report To:

Regional Council

Meeting Date:

29 September 2022

Report Writer:

Oliver Haycock, Team Leader - Service Planning and Project Deliver

Report Authoriser:

Mat Taylor, General Manager, Corporate

Purpose:

Request for a change to the financial authority delegated to the Chief Executive in relation to the Public Transport Services & Infrastructure Business Case

 

 

Public Transport Services and Infrastructure Business Case - Delegated Authority Update

 

Executive Summary

At a meeting of the Regional Council on 17 February 2022, members approved the Procurement Plan for the Public Transport Services and Infrastructure Business Case. Authority was to the Chief Executive to approve and sign the required procurement documentation.

It has since transpired that the delegation requested by staff was not consistent with the delegation usually requested for projects of this scale.

Staff are therefore seeking to correct this oversight, by asking Council to approve an updated delegation.

 

Recommendations

That the Regional Council:

1        Receives the report.

2        Delegates authority to the Chief Executive to accept tenders, and approve contracts, supplier selections and make payments, including contract variations and renewals, for the Western Bay Public Transport Services & Infrastructure Single Stage Business Case.

1.        Introduction

The Western Bay Public Transport Services & Infrastructure Single Stage Business Case is identified as the number one priority project in the 2021-24 Regional Land Transport Plan (RLTP).  Funding has been approved by Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency and the next stage is to procure professional services to develop the business case.

A Procurement Plan was approved at meeting of the Regional Council on 17 February 2022.

Whilst some authority was delegated to the Chief Executive as part of the resolution granted on 17 February 2022, it has since transpired that the delegation requested by staff was too narrow. Staff are therefore seeking to correct this oversight, by asking members to approve a clearer delegation.

This has not impacted project timescales. The project team have executed the Procurement Plan, releasing a Request for Proposals to the market. The deadline for tender submissions was 8 September 2022 and the evaluation process is ongoing.

1.1      Legislative Framework

The Regional Council’s Procurement Guide has been followed to help guide the approach to procurement and the Project Team have worked closely with the Procurement Team.

1.2      Alignment with Strategic Framework

A Vibrant Region

We lead regional transport strategy and system planning, working with others to deliver a safe and reliable public transport system.

We contribute to delivering integrated planning and growth management strategies especially for sustainable urban management.

We work with and connect the right people to create a prosperous region and economy.

The Way We Work

We continually seek opportunities to innovate and improve.

We look to partnerships for best outcomes.

We use robust information, science and technology.

In addition to the Regional Council’s Strategic Framework, the Western Bay Public Transport Services & Infrastructure Single Stage Business Case is identified in both the Urban Form and Transport initiative (UFTI) and the Western Bay Transport System Plan (TSP) as a key next step in helping deliver the “Connected Centres” programme.

1.2.1    Community Well-beings Assessment

Dominant Well-Beings Affected

þ Environmental

Medium - Positive

þ Cultural

Medium - Positive

þ Social

Medium - Positive

þ Economic

Medium - Positive

·      Environmental – reducing transport emissions, including greenhouse gases (carbon).

·      Cultural – providing transport choices for Māori communities to access essential services, education and employment; and involving Māori in decision-making

·      Social – providing sustainable transport choices and opportunities for the community (this is the main contribution to community well-being). Social benefit is the key wellbeing relevant to many public transport decisions, particularly fares and service routes and frequencies.

·      Economic – improvements to economic productivity through the reduction of traffic congestion (where sufficient people change from single-occupancy cars to public transport). This is more applicable in dense urban areas.

 

2.        Background

2.1      What the Business Case is going to address

The Western Bay of Plenty sub-region is experiencing significant population growth and this is expected to continue over the next 50+ years.  With this growth comes additional transport problems such as increased congestion and journey times, if people continue to choose the use of private vehicles and the associated increased transport emissions (both local and global).  The provision of a high-quality public transport system that allows people to travel when they want, to where they want, will be a game changer in the way people live.  The Western Bay Public Transport Services & Infrastructure Single Stage Business will investigate how the current public transport system can be improved, and identify the infrastructure needed to support mode shift.

2.1.1    Outcomes Sought

The business case will investigate and prioritise investment opportunities to increase the use of public transport by improving the attractiveness of bus services.  This will be by considering changes to both the public transport services as well as the supporting infrastructure.  The business case has a 10-year horizon and a 30-year outlook. Whilst it will consider trigger points for more invasive measures, such as rapid transit / rail, the predominant focus will be on the delivery of bus-based solutions. Getting more people using public transport will lead to:

·      Increased travel choice and improved accessibility for all;

·      Faster, more frequent and reliable services;

·      Increased bus patronage;

·      Less reliance on car ownership;

·      Reduced carbon emissions from transport;

·      Supporting healthier built environment;

·      Reduced community harm from transport;

·      Supporting sustainable urban form and general intensification;

·      Supporting regional economy / productivity through improved efficiency of the transport network; and

·      Value for money /fare box recovery.

This business case will help deliver one of the five regional objectives as detailed in the 2021-24 RLTP – improving multi-modal access and choice with a key goal of increasing mode share for public transport and active modes within urban areas and communities to 20% by 2030.

2.1.2    Technical Work Progressed to Date

Work has now concluded on the production of a “Public Transport Reference Case”. This aspect of the business case was expediated to provide consistent and accurate public transport assumptions to the various other transport projects ongoing around Tauranga and the Western Bay, being delivered by our partners.

The work to produce the Reference Case considered several network structures, which were presented and scored at a stakeholder workshop. This identified the potential benefit of developing a “hybrid” network structure, utilising both “through routing” and “hub and spoke”. Customer focus was at the heart of the Reference Case development. Further detail around the Reference Case will be developed as part of the Single Stage Business Case.

The Reference Case aligns with both the Regional Land Transport Plan (RLTP), the recently adopted Regional Public Transport Plan (RPTP) and has the capacity to support the emerging Vehicle Kilometres Travelled (VKT) / Emissions Reduction Plan (ERP) targets.

Members of the Tauranga Joint Public Transport Committee were briefed on the progress of this work on 22 August 2022.

3.        Procurement Approach

The budget for the development of the business case is $900,000.  The complexity (scale as well as consideration of both services and infrastructure), and high value, means that the classification is confirmed as Procurement Type C.  The Procurement Plan developed was therefore:

·      Single stage;

·      Standard Request for Tender/Request for Proposal; and

·      Open competition.

Both Tauranga City Council and Waka Kotahi, as co-funders of the business case, were engaged with and their feedback incorporated into the Procurement Plan and its subsequent execution.

3.1      Scope of Work

The scope of the services required is the delivery of a Single Stage Business Case, in line with Waka Kotahi’s business case approach, that will:

·      Confirm the public transport operating service model and network to achieve UFTI and TSP model split targets;

·      Use robust data to propose evidence-based investment priorities;

·      Confirm infrastructure improvements needed to support the new public transport services in achieving these targets; and

·      Include engagement with the community particularly around possible changes to the service network.

There is also a desire for greater involvement by the project team throughout the development of the business case e.g. co-authoring parts of the business case where the data / evidence / expertise is held in-house.  This will lead to a higher quality end product and also greater ownership of the design and implementation stages that will follow in due course.

3.2      Key Requirements

There are some key requirements that have been identified by the Project Team in relation to the professional services supplier including having:

·      A strong record of delivering public transport projects.  This is not a roading or general transport planning project;

·      Experience of developing complex system-level business cases that meet Waka Kotahi’s requirements;

·      The ability to collaborate with a broad range of stakeholders; and

·      A strong approach to communications and engagement.

4.        Considerations

4.1      Risks and Mitigations

The most significant risk related to the procurement process, which in turn could impact on the overall quality of the business case and outcomes from the project, relate to the timing / project programme.

The consultancy market has been described as “red hot”, especially for public transport specialists.  There has been interest in this opportunity from several suppliers, and we have asked for respondents to explain how work could be delivered innovatively and efficiently to accelerate the production of key deliverables

Other risks were identified in the Procurement Plan approved by the Regional Council on 17 February 2022.

4.2      Climate Change

The matters addressed in this report are not sensitive to the effects of climate change. Staff have also considered the effect of the initiative on greenhouse gas emissions and recommend that there will be no effect.

4.3      Implications for Māori

The procurement process has no significant implication for Maori.  However, the outcomes of the business case could be significant, and the Project Team has commenced discussions with the TSP Iwi Advisor (who sits on the project steering group) with a view to liaising with the TSP Tangata Whenua Group. Updates have also been provided to Te Rangapū.

4.4      Community Engagement

Adobe Systems

INVOLVE

Whakaura

To work directly with affected communities throughout the process to ensure that their issues and concerns are consistently understood and fully considered in Council’s decision making.

 

Surveys of bus users and non-bus users provide detailed information on what can be done to improve the public transport experience.  There is also significant work that needs to be done to change the negative perception of public transport.  Our experience of the recent Network Refresh, as well as learnings from other public transport improvement projects in New Zealand, confirm the need for genuine engagement through the development of the business case.  The need for this was identified in the Procurement Plan approved by the Regional Council on 17 February 2022.

4.5      Financial Implications

There are no material unbudgeted financial implications and this fits within the allocated budget.

The total project budget is $1.2M of which $900,000 has been allocated to the development of the business case itself.  $200,000 has been allocated for an update to the public transport module of the Strategic Transport Model and for specific project related communications and engagement resource. $100,000 has been spent on the production of a Public Transport Reference Case.

Of the $1.2M total, $350,000 is Regional Council’s contribution as per the Long Term Plan.  The remaining contributions are $350,000 from Tauranga City Council and $500,000 from Waka Kotahi.  Western Bay of Plenty District Council is a non-funding partner.  A Funding Agreement has been entered into by the three funding partners.

5.        Next Steps

The granting of this delegation will enable staff to contract with a preferred supplier to progress the production of a Single Stage Business Case.

It is anticipated that this business case will take approximately 12 months to complete. Findings from this process will be used to inform the next Long Term Plan process next year.

 


 

 

 

Report To:

Regional Council

Meeting Date:

29 September 2022

Report Writer:

Mark Le Comte, Principal Advisor, Finance and Kumaren Perumal, Chief Financial Officer

Report Authoriser:

Mat Taylor, General Manager, Corporate

Purpose:

To receive Annual Reports for the year ended 30 June 2022 for the Quayside Holdings Limited Group and Toi Moana Trust.

 

 

Quayside Group and Toi Moana Trust Annual Reports for the year ended 30 June 2022

 

Executive Summary

The purpose of this report is to provide an overview of the performance of Quayside Holdings Limited Group (Quayside) and the Toi Moana Trust for the year ended 30 June 2022, and for Council to receive the Annual Report and Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2022.

Quayside has met all 10 of its performance targets for the 2021/2022 financial year and fully paid the budgeted dividends to Council and Perpetual Preference Shareholders. Quayside has also provided copies of Annual Reports for its subsidiaries. Quayside’s financial summary includes:

·      Total assets $3.2 billion ($2.5 billion 2021) comprised of $2.7 billion for the Port of Tauranga and $479.2 million non-port investments.

·      Net assets of $2.5 billion ($1.8 billion 2021).

·      Net profit $125.9 million ($154.1 million 2021) comprised of $111.3 million for the Port of Tauranga and $14.6 million non-port investments.

Council is also requested to consider increasing the director remuneration pool for 2022/23 and 2023/24, which is based on a recommendation from Quayside’s Chief Executive and advice received from Strategic Pay on director fees.

The Toi Moana Trust met 4 out of 5 performance targets for the 2021/2022 financial year including paying the budgeted dividend and ‘catch up’ dividend in full. The missed target is the result of fluctuations in the market value of investments with a decline in value at the valuation date.

 

Recommendations

That the Regional Council:

1        Receives the report, Quayside Group and Toi Moana Trust Annual Reports for the year ended 30 June 2022.

2        Approves the aggregate remuneration pool for Quayside Holdings Limited’s directors for 2022/23 at $475,000 (plus GST if any), being an increase from $380,209 based on six paid directors, including remuneration paid by Quayside Holdings Limited’s subsidiaries – Quayside Securities Limited and Quayside Properties Limited;

3        Approves increasing Quayside Holdings Limited’s Directors’ Fees for 2022/23, including remuneration paid by Quayside Holdings Limited’s subsidiaries – Quayside Securities Limited and Quayside Properties Limited, to:

(a)  Chair $130,000

(b)  Chair of Audit Committee $75,000

(c)  Chair of People, Culture and Safety Committee $75,000

(d)  Three Directors at $65,000 per Director

(e)  Council Chief Executive $0

4        Approves the aggregate remuneration pool for Quayside Holdings Limited’s directors for 2023/24 at $510,000 (plus GST if any), being an increase from $475,000 based on six paid directors, including remuneration paid by Quayside Holdings Limited’s subsidiaries – Quayside Securities Limited and Quayside Properties Limited;

5        Approves increasing Quayside Holdings Limited’s Directors’ Fees for 2023/24, including remuneration paid by Quayside Holdings Limited’s subsidiaries – Quayside Securities Limited and Quayside Properties Limited, to:

(a)  Chair $140,000

(b)  Chair of Audit Committee $80,000

(c)  Chair of People, Culture and Safety Committee $80,000

(d)  Three Directors at $70,000 per Director

(e)  Council Chief Executive $0

6        Reappoint the Office of the Auditor-General, as the Auditors of the Company, and authorise the Directors of Quayside Holdings Limited to negotiate with the Office of the AuditorGeneral pursuant to the Public Audit Act 2001 to set the Auditor’s remuneration for the ensuing year.

 

 

1.        Introduction

The Bay of Plenty Regional Council has received the Annual Reports and an assessment of performance targets against the Statement of Intent for Quayside group, and the Toi Moana Trust. These annual reports accompany this report, as Supporting Documents, and key highlights are discussed in section 2.

At the time this paper was written, the Annual Reports for the Quayside Group and Toi Moana Trust had been audited but not yet approved by the Board. Council is not required to approve the Quayside Annual Report and staff will report any material changes to a future Council meeting if necessary.

1.1      Legislative Framework

Quayside is required to provide annual reporting information to shareholders within three months of the end of the financial year as set out in the Local Government Act 2002. The statutory time limit has been extended from 30 September to 30 November for the 2021/22 financial year. There is no requirement for Council to approve these annual reports.

Each annual report must include:

·      A comparison of the performance of the organisation and its subsidiaries with the Statement of Intent;

·      An explanation of any material variances;

·      The dividend to be paid;

·      Audited consolidated financial statements;

·      Auditors report on those financial statements.

 

1.2      Alignment with Strategic Framework

 

A Healthy Environment

 

Freshwater for Life

 

Safe and Resilient Communities

 

A Vibrant Region

 

The Way We Work

We deliver value to our ratepayers and our customers.

The annual reports for the year ended 30 June 2022 provide information on the financial and non-financial performance of Quayside and its subsidiaries. Quayside provides specialist financial services and advice to improve the long-term value received from Council’s investments. The dividend received from Quayside and the Toi Moana Trust is used to reduce general rates to improve rates affordability for the community.

1.2.1    Community Well-beings Assessment

Dominant Well-Beings Affected

þ Environmental

 

þ Cultural

 

þ Social

 

þ Economic

 

 

The dividend from Quayside Holdings Limited is applied to general funded Council activities to reduce the general rates requirement, which supports the delivery of all four Community Outcomes and the Way We Work.

 

2.        Quayside Group and Toi Moana Trust Annual Reports for the year ended 30 June 2022

Draft Annual reports for the Quayside Group and the Toi Moana Trust have been audited and, as at 19 September 2022, are in the Board approval process. The financials and performance measures are audited final figures; however, text and graphics may be updated. Staff will advise at a future Council Meeting if there are any material changes from draft to final versions of the annual reports.

2.1      Quayside Holdings Limited Annual Report

The draft Annual Report for Quayside for the year ended 30 June 2022 is included as attachment 1.

Quayside delivered the budgeted dividends in full to the Council and Perpetual Preference Shareholders. Quayside achieved a net profit after tax of $125.9 million and achieved all 10 of its performance targets.

Quayside’s financial summary includes:

·      Total assets $3.2 billion ($2.5 billion 2021) comprised of $2.7 billion for the Port of Tauranga and $479.2 million non-port investments. The main driver of the increased value is a non-cash gain of $537 million from revaluation of freehold land.

·      Net assets of $2.5 billion ($1.8 billion 2021).

·      Net profit $125.9 million ($154.1 million 2021) comprised of $111.3 million for the Port of Tauranga and $14.6 million non-port investments.

·      8.7% increase in Port of Tauranga Group net profit.

·      10.7% internal rate of return for non-port assets for the last five years.

Quayside’s performance highlights include:

·      Port of Tauranga has recorded a decrease of 2.1% in total greenhouse gas emissions for the year.

·      Rangiuru stage 1A earthworks commenced and titles on schedule for issue in 2024. This stage is focussed on key infrastructure requirements such as stormwater, wastewater, internal roading and the interchange connection with the Tauranga Eastern Link.

·      Huakiwi has concluded its kiwifruit planting programme with a total of 68 canopy hectares.

·      Aqua Curo bioremediation trial has prevented over 100 kilograms of nitrogen from entering our fresh waterways.

The Annual Reports for the subsidiaries of Quayside are included as supporting documents.

2.2      Director Fees 2022/23

Quayside have completed benchmarking of Director fees. This process included advice from Strategic Pay, review by Quayside’s People, Culture and Safety Committee and approval from the Quayside Board to recommend an increase in Director fees to Council.

The Chief Executive of Quayside has written to Council recommending that the aggregate remuneration pool for Quayside’s Directors is increased to $475,000 (plus GST if any) from $380,209 as outlined in attachment 2. The recommendation from Quayside proposes a further increase to $510,000 in 2023/2024. These figures include remuneration paid directly by Quayside and its subsidiaries Quayside Securities Limited and Quayside Properties Limited Council’s Chief Executive is a director of Quayside but is not remunerated by Quayside for this role. The proposed remuneration for each position (and 2021/22 remuneration) on the Board is shown in the table below.:

·    

Position

Current Fee

2022/2023 Proposed Fee

2023/2024 Proposed Fee

Chair

93,171

130,000

140,000

Chair of Audit and Risk Committee

69,210

75,000

80,000

Chair of People, Culture and Safety Committee

58,108

75,000

80,000

Three Directors (per director)

159,720

(53,240)

195,000

(65,000)

210,000

(70,000)

Council Chief Executive

0

0

0

Total fee

380,209

475,000

510,000

 

The Quayside Chief Executive advises they have taken external and reputable market advice on Director remuneration to ensure it is fair, reasonable and set at conservative levels while still taking into consideration the complexity of the business and the need to attract quality directors to the Quayside Board. While this is a large percentage increase, Quayside advises that this is because the base annual director fees have not increased since 2007 and the size, complexity and value of Quayside has increased substantially since then.

Councillors are requested to consider the request to increase director remuneration for 2022/23 and 2023/24.

2.3      Toi Moana Trust Annual Report

The Draft Annual Report for the Toi Moana Trust for the year ended 30 June 2022 is included as attachment 3.

The Toi Moana Trust paid the budgeted dividend of $4.5 million in full. This included the normal dividend of $2.25 million and a catch-up dividend of $2.25 million from prior years.

The Toi Moana Trust achieved 4 of its 5 performance targets.

The missed target is the result of fluctuations in the market value of investments with a decline in value at the valuation date. These investments are designed to be held for five years or more and provide a return and capital preservation over that timeframe. The value of the Toi Moana Trust is subject to fluctuation and the value of the investment needs to be viewed over the long-term. 

 

3.        Considerations

3.1      Risks and Mitigations

There are no direct risk implications arising as a result of this report.

3.2      Climate Change

The matters addressed in this report are of a procedural nature and there is no need to consider climate change impacts. Quayside’s investments include consideration of socially responsible investment principles.

3.3      Implications for Māori

Quayside holds some investments in partnership with Māori including Huakiwi which is a joint venture with Te Tumu Paeroa and is focused on whenua Māori and long-term employment for the community.

 

3.4      Community Engagement

 

Adobe Systems

INFORM

Whakamōhio

To provide affected communities with balanced and objective information to assist them in understanding the problems, alternatives and/or solutions.

 

The Annual Reports will be published on Council’s and Quayside’s websites.

 

3.5      Financial Implications

If the recommendation is adopted by Council, will it result in:

-   Unbudgeted work during the current financial year?

-   Unbudgeted work for any of the years remaining in the current Long Term Plan?

If the answer is ‘no’ to both questions please select the dropdown option 1 and complete appropriately.

If the answer is ‘yes’ to either question please select “Budget Implications” in the building block below and liaise with your Management Accountant in order to complete the Financial Impact table.

There are no material unbudgeted financial implications and this fits within the allocated budget. Quayside and the Toi Moana Trust delivered the budgeted dividends to Council in full.

4.        Next Steps

Next Steps: What next? What resources are needed? Further analysis? Timeframes ahead. Any consultation planned. Remind Council of the process ahead. Next update to Council?

Conclusion: Short concluding remarks. Referring back to recommendations. No new content.

The Local Government Act 2002 requires Council to publish the annual reports for Council Controlled Organisations on the Bay of Plenty Regional Council website within one month of receipt. The final versions of the annual reports for Quayside, Quayside subsidiaries and the Toi Moana Trust will be published when received.

Attachments

Attachment 1 - QHL Financials - replace with full AR when available

Attachment 2 - Recommendation on Quayside Director Fees

Attachment 3 - Toi Moana Trust draft Annual Report for year ended 30 June 2022

Supporting Document 1 - Aqua Curo draft Annual Report for year ended 30 June 2022

Supporting Document 2 - Quayside Barnett Place draft Annual Report for year ended 30 June 2022

Supporting Document 3 - Quayside Investment Trust draft Annual Report for year ended 30 June 2022

Supporting Document 4 - Quayside Mystery Valley draft Annual Report for year ended 30 June 2022

Supporting Document 5 - Quayside Portside Drive draft Annual Report for year ended 30 June 2022

Supporting Document 6 - Quayside Properties draft Annual Report for year ended 30 June 2022

Supporting Document 7   Quayside Tauriko draft Annual Report for year ended 30 June 2022

Supporting Document 8   Quayside Te Papa Tipu draft Annual Report for year ended 30 June 2022

Supporting Document 9   Quayside The Vault draft Annual Report for year ended 30 June 2022

Supporting Document 10 Quayside Unit Trust draft Annual Report for year ended 30 June 2022

Supporting Document 11 Huakiwi Developments draft Annual Report for year ended 30 June 2022

Supporting Document 12 Huakiwi Services draft Annual Report for year ended 30 June 2022

Supporting Document 13 Lakes Commercial Developments draft Annual report for year ended 30 June 2022

Supporting Document 14 Tauranga Commercial Developments draft Annual Report for year ended 30 June 2022   


Regional Council                                                                                                               29 September 2022

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Regional Council                                                                                              29 September 2022

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Regional Council                                                                                              29 September 2022

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Regional Council                                                                                              29 September 2022

 

Item 9.4

Supporting Document 1

Aqua Curo draft Annual Report for year ended 30 June 2022


Regional Council                                                                                              29 September 2022

 

Item 9.4

Supporting Document 2

Quayside Barnett Place draft Annual Report for year ended 30 June 2022


Regional Council                                                                                              29 September 2022

 

Item 9.4

Supporting Document 3

Quayside Investment Trust draft Annual Report for year ended 30 June 2022


Regional Council                                                                                              29 September 2022

 

Item 9.4

Supporting Document 4

Quayside Mystery Valley draft Annual Report for year ended 30 June 2022


Regional Council                                                                                              29 September 2022

 

Item 9.4

Supporting Document 5

Quayside Portside Drive draft Annual Report for year ended 30 June 2022


Regional Council                                                                                              29 September 2022

 

Item 9.4

Supporting Document 6

Quayside Properties draft Annual Report for year ended 30 June 2022


Regional Council                                                                                              29 September 2022

 

Item 9.4

Supporting Document 7

Quayside Tauriko draft Annual Report for year ended 30 June 2022


Regional Council                                                                                              29 September 2022

 

Item 9.4

Supporting Document 8

Quayside Te Papa Tipu draft Annual Report for year ended 30 June 2022


Regional Council                                                                                              29 September 2022

 

Item 9.4

Supporting Document 9

Quayside The Vault draft Annual Report for year ended 30 June 2022


Regional Council                                                                                              29 September 2022

 

Item 9.4

Supporting Document 10

Quayside Unit Trust draft Annual Report for year ended 30 June 2022


Regional Council                                                                                              29 September 2022

 

Item 9.4

Supporting Document 11

Huakiwi Developments draft Annual Report for year ended 30 June 2022


Regional Council                                                                                              29 September 2022

 

Item 9.4

Supporting Document 12

Huakiwi Services draft Annual Report for year ended 30 June 2022


Regional Council                                                                                              29 September 2022

 

Item 9.4

Supporting Document 13

Lakes Commercial Developments draft Annual report for year ended 30 June 2022


Regional Council                                                                                              29 September 2022

 

Item 9.4

Supporting Document 14

Tauranga Commercial Developments draft Annual Report for year ended 30 June 2022


 

 

 

Report To:

Regional Council

Meeting Date:

29 September 2022

Report Writer:

Mark Le Comte, Principal Advisor, Finance and Kumaren Perumal, Chief Financial Officer

Report Authoriser:

Mat Taylor, General Manager, Corporate

Purpose:

For Council to receive the Toi Moana Trust Statement of Intent

 

 

Toi Moana Trust Statement of Intent

 

Executive Summary

Council received the Statements of Intent for Quayside Holdings and its subsidiaries at the 11 August Council Meeting. The paper noted that the Statement of Intent for the Toi Moana Trust would be presented at the September Council Meeting.

This report intends to complete the Council process for the Toi Moana Trust Statement of Intent. This has included:

·      Council’s statement of expectations

·      Council Consideration of the draft Statement of Intent

·      The Toi Moana Trust Board considering Council’s feedback on the draft Statement of Intent

·      Staff review of changes between the draft and final Statement of Intent and checking that Council’s feedback on the draft has been incorporated.

The major changes to note in the final Statement of Intent are that:

·      Extra investment of $25 million has been included as per Council’s feedback. The dividend payment has increased by $1.25 million, i.e. 5% return.

·      The capital preservation target has changed from being assessed on an initial seven-year term to a rolling five-year basis.

 

Recommendations

That the Regional Council:

1        Receives the report, Toi Moana Trust Statement of Intent.

 

 

1.        Introduction

The Toi Moana Trust is a Council Controlled Organisation (CCO).

Schedule 8 of the Local Government Act (2002) requires Council Controlled Organisations to deliver to shareholders their completed Statements of Intent (SOI) before the financial year to which it relates.

1.1      Legislative Framework

The requirements and process for completing the SOI is set in the LGA sections 64, 64A, 64B and schedule 8.

Council may, by resolution, require the CCO Board to make changes to the SOI. Before making such a resolution Council must consult with the CCO Board. Staff do not propose that Council should require any changes to the SOI.

1.2      Alignment with Strategic Framework

 

A Healthy Environment

Freshwater for Life

Safe and Resilient Communities

A Vibrant Region

The Way We Work

We deliver value to our ratepayers and our customers.

The Toi Moana Trust manages investments for Council to achieve a return on invested funds to reduce the general rates requirement. The funds in the Toi Moana Trust are sourced from Council’s cash reserves that are forecast to be invested for a term of five years or more.

1.2.1    Community Well-beings Assessment

Dominant Well-Beings Affected

¨ Environmental

 

¨ Cultural

 

¨ Social

 

þ Economic

Low - Positive

 

2.        Toi Moana Trust Statement of Intent

This report intends to complete the Council process for the Toi Moana Trust SOI. To date, this has included:

·      Council’s statement of expectations

 

·      Council consideration of the draft SOI

 

·      The Quayside Board considering Council’s feedback on the draft SOI

 

·      Staff review of changes between the draft and final Statement of Intent and checking that Council’s feedback on the draft has been incorporated.

The major changes to note in the final Statement of Intent are that:

·      Extra investment of $25 million has been included as per Council’s feedback. The dividend payment has increased by $1.25 million, i.e. 5% return. This additional investment was deposited on 1 July 2022.

·      The market value of the initial investment reduced from $45 million to $43.7 million. The Statement of Intent must be approved before 1 July 2022 and, therefore, used the valuation as at 31 May 2022 as the most recent valuation available.

This reduced value is shown for the next three years in the Statement of Intent. Since then, the market valuation of the Toi Moana Trust declined further to $43.1 million as at 30 June 2022 which is the value in the Annual Report (see separate paper).

The Toi Moana Trust is primarily invested in New Zealand and Australian shares. The overall returns on these markets from 30 June 2022 to 14 September 2022 has been 7.2% for the NZX50 and 3.9% for the ASX200. Staff consider that this is a short-term fluctuation, and that market returns have been favourable for recovery of the market value.

·      The capital preservation target has changed from being assessed on an initial seven-year term to a rolling five-year basis. Staff consider this is an appropriate change to incorporate the additional investment and that the reduced timeframe for capital preservation is favourable i.e. a shorter timeframe indicated less volatility and more certainty.

 

3.        Considerations

3.1      Risks and Mitigations

The Toi Moana Trust is one component of Council’s overall investments managed by Quayside. Quayside manages a diversified portfolio of investments to mitigate individual investment risks. Council and Quayside staff meet regularly to discuss treasury operations and risk management.

3.2      Climate Change

The matters addressed in this report are of a procedural nature and there is no need to consider climate change impacts.

3.3      Implications for Māori

The implications for Māori are directly related to rates required and are of a financial nature only.

3.4      Community Engagement

 

Adobe Systems

INFORM

Whakamōhio

To provide affected communities with balanced and objective information to assist them in understanding the problems, alternatives and/or solutions.

 

3.5      Financial Implications

The Toi Moana Trust SOI shows a reduced market value of the initial investment which reflects market volatility at the valuation date.

The Toi Moana Trust is primarily invested in New Zealand and Australian shares. The overall returns on these markets from 30 June 2022 to 14 September 2022 has been 7.2% for the NZX50 and 3.9% for the ASX200.

4.        Next Steps

The Toi Moana Trust Statement of Intent will be published on Council’s webpage. Councillors will be requested to consider a Statement of Expectations for the Quayside Group and the Toi Moana Trust as part of preparing Annual Plan 2023/24.

 

Attachments

Attachment 1 - Toi Moana Trust Statement of Intent 2022/23   


Regional Council                                                                                              29 September 2022

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Report To:

Regional Council

Meeting Date:

29 September 2022

Report Writer:

Stephanie Macdonald, Community Engagement Team Leader; Ben Parker-Haar, Programme Coordinator (Organisational Performance) and Natalie Richards, Community Engagement Advisor

Report Authoriser:

Kataraina O'Brien, Director, Strategic Engagement

Purpose:

Update council on the delivery of the Community Participation Action Plan.

 

 

Community Participation Annual Report

 

Executive Summary

The Community Participation Impact Area is being delivered by a cross organisational team with a coordinated approach to community engagement, Volunteering, Funding Community-Led Projects and Democracy. This paper provides an overview of work in progress, highlights and the monitoring underway.

The Community Participation, as well as Climate Change and Partnerships with Māori are the three key impact areas for Toi Moana.

 

Recommendations

That the Regional Council:

1        Receives the report, Community Participation Annual Report.

 

1.        Introduction

Community Participation is a strategic priority and one of the three Impact Areas for the Bay of Plenty Regional Council. Council’s vision is more action through greater community involvement, awareness and leadership. This is being delivered through a cross organisational network with four workstreams: Community Engagement, Volunteering, Funding Community Led Projects and Democracy.

Council adopted the Community Participation Action Plan in December 2021 as an internal roadmap. Specific workstream papers presented this year include:

·      Youth Engagement Plan 2022 to Toi Moana Council Committee meeting on 23 June 2022

·      Environmental Volunteering to Toi Moana Monitoring and Operations Committee meeting on 6 September 2022.

This report provides a snapshot of highlights from the Community Participation Impact Area.

 

1.1      Legislative Framework

This work is guided by the Local Government Act, in particular s10 Purpose of local government and s82 Principles of consultation.

1.2      Alignment with Strategic Framework

 

A Healthy Environment

We work cohesively with volunteers and others, to sustainably manage and improve our natural resources.

The Way We Work

We continually seek opportunities to innovate and improve.

1.2.1    Community Well-beings Assessment

Dominant Well-Beings Affected

¨ Environmental

 

¨ Cultural

 

þ Social

 

¨ Economic

 

 

Enhanced community participation in local government contributes to greater connections between community and te Taiao, grows social cohesion and brings the lived experience of into decision making processes that affect our diverse community. Social capital is difficult to measure, but volunteer hours, voter turnout and representative participation can all provide a proxy for the social wellbeing created for community through their interactions with council

 

 

2.        Ngā Kaupapa Miramira | Highlights

2.1      Community Engagement

Engagement is when we purposefully approach affected communities to help shape decisions about our proposed plans and actions. Covid disruption has meant digital and online engagement, proactively engaging young people and empowering community through participatory budgeting has become even more important to deliver on this impact area.

2.1.1    Digital and Online Engagement

The Participate site, (www.participate.boprc.govt.nz) is supporting delivery of our action plan and impact areas by engaging with the community through our online platforms. Since launching the site in February 2021 we now have 3391 registered users.

The site offers the ability to provide feedback and engagement via its integrated tools.  In the past twelve months, Participate has hosted over 20 online engagement projects where almost 20,000 people have visited the site and made over 2000 contributions (providing feedback or engagement) on this platform alone.  

The Top visited Projects in the year to 1 September 2022 were:

·    School Sustainability and Resilience Fund (7,205 Visits)

·    Regional Public Transport Plan (2,392 Visits)

·    Bus Network Refresh (2,167 Visits)

·    Rotorua Bus network Refresh (2,032 Visits)

·    Rates Remission and Postponement Policy (1,841 Visits)

The ability to have your say through online surveys, mapping, polling, and realtime feedback has been complimentary to the existing online channels such as Facebook, Zoom and our Website which have hosted webinars and livestreams.  Demographic data obtained through Participate is reviewed regularly and mapped against NZ Census Data to ensure that we are reaching a wide range of views across the region.

Performance Summary for the year ending 1 September 2022

39,372 Views

The number of times a visitor views any page on a site

22,593 Visits

The number of visits (end user sessions) associated with a single visitor

19,835 Visitors

The number of unique public or end users to a site

2,098 Contributions

The total number of responses or feedback collected through the participation tools

1,922 Contributors

The unique number of visitors who have left feedback or contributions on a site through participation tools

 

Receiving feedback on complex issues


The recent Essential Freshwaters and Visions Outcome project was noted by Harvest Digital (Participate provider) to their clients (in Australia, New Zealand and Canada) as one of their top five projects in the last quarter. 

They chose this project because the interactive mapping tool was effective at engaging readers who were able to provide direct feedback on the area that affected them the most.  This project attracted over 600 visitors with 97 completing the mapping tool and providing feedback on a topic that would have been difficult to reach audiences with through traditional methods.  Refer below:

Essential Freshwaters and Visions Outcome project on Participate Bay of Plenty effectively allowed community to provide feedback on the area that affected them most. Link: https://www.participate.boprc.govt.nz/vision-and-outcomes

2.1.2    Youth Engagement

The Youth Engagement Plan was adopted by Council 23 June 2022.This plan outlines how young people (16-25 years old) can be involved in decision making and action with the Bay of Plenty Regional Coil Toi Moana going forward. It was prepared over six months and presented by representatives of the Youth Involvement Panel (YIP).  Community Engagement staff are working alongside teams across council and partners to deliver on action points.

Key Highlights:

Relationship Building


Being more visible and approachable underpins many of the actions in the Youth Engagement Plan. Establishing and strengthening relationships with schools, youth groups and key stakeholders is underway to ensure a wraparound approach to youth engagement wherein time and resources are used in the most beneficial way.

   

Connecting young people to the work council does


Staff attended the Canvas Careers Expo in Tauranga, and Edgecumbe College Careers Evening on 13 August 2022. Staff attended along with YIP group members to showcase the mahi people at Toi Moana, highlighting career pathways and promoting the Summer Experience Programme. Over 3000 rangatahi were reached through these actions. Interviews of young staff by YIP members are planned to be filmed in October.

 

Connecting young people with volunteering


Many young people have been engaged in planting days with local trusts and care groups this Winter. For example the following kura/schools have taken part in planting events with the Coastal Catchments team in the Western Bay:

·   Otamarakau

·   Paengaroa

·   Rangiuru

·   Te Puke Primary

·   Te Puke Intermediate

·   Pukehina 

·   Maketu kura

·   Te Kura Kaupapa o Te Matai

·   Waihi Beach

 

Care group opportunities and events open to the public are communicated through the monthly Participate eNewsletter. This e-newletter currently has 1,402 unique subscribers.

2.1.3    Participatory budgeting

Toi Moana trialled this a new funding technique called participatory budgeting with the School Sustainability & Resilience Fund launched in February.  Participatory budgeting is a way of providing funding where community members propose projects that meet set criteria and funding is allocated based on a public voting process. Educational institutes in the region submitted proposed projects related to sustainability and climate change resilience action.

·      46 applications from schools, kohanga, kura, preschools, kindergartens and other education organisations from across the region worth more than $150,000 to the Fund passed screening and were put to public vote.

·      1416 individuals allocated funding through the online platform to prioritise $35,000 of funding.

·      Representatives of the Youth Involvement Panel (YIP) allocated the remaining $15,000 to projects that had been unsuccessful in the public voting based on criteria they established independently

·      18 projects are under contract to deliver their projects by the end of 2022.

Increasing the reach and representativeness of participants in council decision making and action is a focus of this Impact Area, and project in particular. Online participant age, gender, ethnicity and postcode are the closest match to census data yet, with a representativeness index of 0.68. (0 is no correlation, 1 would be a perfect match). Staff will monitor and report on the projects funded early in 2023.

2.2      Volunteering

Through the Long-Term Plan 2021 development, an additional $500,000 funding was allocated annually to support volunteers, coordinated through the Integrated Catchments Team. This funding provided additional support to care groups working directly with council ($215,000) and t volunteer sector organisations ($285,000).

2.2.1    Definitions and measures of volunteering

The definition of an ‘environmental volunteer’ agreed to at Councils Operations and Monitoring Committee on 6 September 2022 is: “A person who chooses to work voluntarily for the environmental good of the community and is supported directly or indirectly by Bay of Plenty Regional Council”

The table below provides a summary of three key work areas that contribute to environmental Volunteering and receive direct funding support from Council.

Measure

Catchment, Land & Estuary Care Groups

Coast Care

Environmental Enhancement Fund

Total

Measure 1: Number of people who contributed time to environmental volunteering during the financial year in groups supported by Council.

2,445

3,203

3,525

9,286

Measure 2: Number of environmental volunteer hours invested during the financial year in groups supported by Council (also shown as FTEs[1]).

62,703

(34.1 FTEs)

6,139

(3.3 FTEs)

11,903

(6.5 FTEs)

80,745

(43.9 FTEs)

Measure 3: Number of care or catchment volunteer groups directly supported by Council during the financial year.

78 (3 new groups)

1

n/a

79

Detailed examples of work carried out through environmental volunteering and including care groups was presented to the Monitoring and Operations Committee (8 March 2022). Some highlights for the year were:

Anglican Church of Raukōkore Restoration and Preservation Trust Care Group
This restoration project underway near Waihau Bay is focused around the 125 year old Anglican Church of Raukōkore. Volunteers are planting natives, removing weeds and trapping pests in the vulnerable coastal area to protect habitat for the resident Little Blue Penguins and the historic building culturally significant for Te Whānau- ā-Apanui.

Friends of The Blade,  Whakamarama Community Inc.


This is a volunteer-run community conservation group aims to reduce pest animals within their project area  of the Kaimai Mamaku Forest Park in to allow the native birds and bush to flourish. In 2016 a group of enthusiastic locals started planning and cutting trap lines through 90 hectares of bush with high predator numbers. Five years on, the group moved from toxins  to non-toxic bait in DOC-approved humane traps, and have 300ha under protection supported by over 40 local volunteers.

2.2.2    Volunteer Sector Capability and Capacity 

Council confirmed funding of $285,000 per annum for three groups through LTP 2021-2031 deliberations. This funding provides professional support and training to enable the environmental volunteer sector organisations to operate effectively and to grow the sector. Funding agreements are in place all three organisations for three years ending 30 June 2024.  

·      Bay Conservation Alliance (BCA) $85,000

·      NZ Landcare $100,000

·      Envirohub $100,000

2.3      Funding Community Led Projects

As part of the Community Participation Action Plan 2021/22, community funding focused on ensuring the greatest impact and value from our grants and funds.

2.3.1    Environmental Enhancement Fund

The Environmental Enhancement Fund (EEF) supports local projects that aim to enhance, preserve, or protect the region's natural or historic character. For the first time in several years the fund was fully subscribed for 2021/2022 and $322,837 of funding was allocated. Projects came from a mixture of well established applicants and newly formed, motivated community groups. Already this financial year, the fund has received over $360,000 worth of applications. (Correct as of 01/09/2022).

Some highlights for the year were:

Te Takinga Marae - members of the community came together to construct a riverside boardwalk connecting the marae in Mourea to the adjacent playground area and planted native plants, Rongoa and Maara kai.

Whakatāne Kiwi Trust - this group enhanced and expanded on their trapping network in the Whakatāne District. Through community-based projects and landowner cooperation the area is seeing the kiwi and other indigenous species thrive.

Waihī Beach School - the school have been revitalising the Joan Jensen grove. A huge amount of community volunteers helped restore forest understory vegetation with native species. Other parts of the project included wetland planting to improve water quality, and plant and pest animal control.

2.3.2    Community Initiatives Fund

The Community Initiatives Fund (CIF) provides funding to community groups to deliver services that contribute strongly to the achievement of Council’s goals, but are not eligible for other Council funding. A total of $600,000.00 was allocated over a 3 year period across 6 projects in the Long Tern Plan 2021.

Some highlights for the year were:

Tauranga Moana Biosecurity - Guardian of the Forest, a creative campaign on Kauri Protection which took place over the Easter weekend and school holidays. It received 79 entries, 1150 votes, 9751 views, 139,538 impressions.

Water safety BOP - Te Puna Ora o Mataatua in Eastern Bay of Plenty are assisting in the design and delivery of various water safety educational workshops and activities to be delivered to the Māori community. Note: Council were advised in June 2022 that due to other funding sources not being continued, Water Safety BOP would not continue to operate in 2022/23. 

Tourism BOP - Representatives from community groups and TBOP were able to effectively promote the Low Carbon Circular Economy programme and engage 18 visitor industry organisations in Waihī Beach and Katikati to sign up.

2.3.3    Regional Safety Rescue Services Fund

The Regional Safety and Rescue Services Fund (RSRSF) supports organisations that provide vital safety and rescue services.

Following Council direction through LTP 2021 Deliberations, Council provided funding to Surf Lifesaving NZ to ensure service levels were maintained across the BOP for the 2021/22 summer with lifeguard services funded across 13 locations. 

In early 2021, the first full funding round for the Regional Safety Rescue Service Fund was completed with funding for five organisations confirmed for 2022/23 to 2023/24 via the Civil Defence and Emergency Management Committee.

Organisation

2021/22

2022/23

2023/24

Surf Lifesaving NZ

$292,000

$327,000

$333,000

Coastguard NZ

 

$20,000

$20,000

Rotorua Mountain Bike Club

 

$80,000

$80,000

Land Search and Rescue

 

$20,000

$20,000

Youth Search and Rescue

 

$4,000

$4,000

Total Funding allocated

$292,000

$451,000

$457,000

The Council Budget for RSRS set through the LTP 2021-2031 is $400,000 per annum. Funding allocations for 2022-2024 include the allocation of $108,000 in reserve funding that was unallocated in 2021/22.

2.3.4    Te Hapai Ora

Te Hapai Ora - Regional Community Outcomes Fund supports community led initiatives across the region, with funding up to $2,000 for events or projects that align with one or more of Toi Moana| BOPRC Community Outcomes. Annually a total fund of $30,000 is available on a ‘first come’ basis. This year ending 30 June, saw a record number of 41 applications, 29 of which were approved funding (in part or in full).

2.3.5    2022/23 Priority actions

Improve the return on investment from community funding projects involving volunteers. This year had a more robust approach towards accurate data but to meet our target we will need to work on how we measure investment.

Community funding review. This goal was originally set due to the low uptake of the Environmental Enhancement Fund but was postponed after the fund regained traction and ended up oversubscribed. This review will now be looked at in a much wider scope.

Helping Hand. This document was due to be updated by end of 2021/22 and is now set for 2022/23.

2.4      Democracy

2.4.1    Participation in Elections

Participation in the formal democratic process includes council meeting, voter enrolment and nominations of candidates. Key actions taken to support this workstream include:

·      Providing enrolment packs at each office reception and at community events attended by staff  including community geothermal meetings, Instep Young Leaders, Canvas Careers expo, Edgecumbe Careers Evening with at least 20 enrolment packs being taken away by participants so far. 

·      Advertising in a range of media across the region to encourage potential candidates to consider standing for council, and planned advertising to encourage voter participation.

·      Updating elections information on the council website

·      Community funding of up to $300 towards reasonable costs to hold “Meet The Candidates” events is available and has been applied for by two community organisations at the time of writing.

·      Meet The Candidate Events planned by council in three towns, Rotorua, Tauranga and Whakatāne with independent MC’s to supplement community led activities.

 

3.        Considerations

3.1      Risks and Mitigations

 

Key Risks

Mitigations

Competition for community participation with other Central and local government engagement

Prioritise our efforts on the issues of greatest interest to community where they can genuinely effect change.

Continue to track upcoming legislative change to minimise conflict and collaborate where there are shared interests.

Digital exclusion of communities

While embracing the benefits of digital tools to connect with community, continue to provide alternative options that are culturally and socially appropriate to the audience and issue

High expectations from community to have a greater influence on decision making and action

Consistent and clear use of language with staff, elected members and community on the ability to impact change

Front foot difficult conversations early where opportunity for community input may be constrained

3.2      Climate Change

 

The Community Participation Impact Area seeks to support actions identified in the Climate Change Action plan including:

·      Supporting constructive community engagement on mitigation and adaptation projects underway with the Engineering and Transport Teams

·      Supporting environmental care groups and volunteer organisations with actions such as planting to assist with carbon reduction, and reduce the impact of sea level rise

·      Promoting behaviour change to reduce emissions through the Future Fit online tool to measure personal carbon emissions.

·      Targeting funding of community led projects to support sustainability and resilience focused outcomes

 

3.3      Implications for Māori

The Community Participation Impact Area seeks to support actions identified in the Partnerships with Māori Action plan including:

3.4      Financial Implications

There are no material unbudgeted financial implications and this fits within the allocated budget.

 

4.        Next Steps

Implementation of the Community Participation Action Plan will continue, and staff will provide regular progress reports. 

  


 

 

 

Report To:

Regional Council

Meeting Date:

29 September 2022

Report Writer:

Jessica Easton, Legal and Commercial Manager

Report Authoriser:

Mat Taylor, General Manager, Corporate

Purpose:

Approve Updated Delegations Manual

 

 

Delegations Manual

 

Executive Summary

This report sets out the proposed Chief Executive’s Delegations Manual pursuant to which Council staff shall operate. 

Pursuant to the Delegations Manual the Chief Executive sub-delegates their powers and functions to council officers to ensure the efficient and effective performance of Council activities. 

 

Recommendations

That the Regional Council:

1        Receives the report, Delegations Manual.

2        Revokes all existing delegations made by Council to the Chief Executive and council officers directly, except to the extent that any of those are not included in the Chief Executive’s Delegations Manual or relate to financial delegations. 

3        Delegates to the Chief Executive as set out in Appendix 1. 

4        Approves the Chief Executive’s sub-delegations contained in the Chief Executive’s Delegations Manual.

5        Delegates the powers contained in the Chief Executive’s Delegations Manual that are unable to be sub-delegated to the Chief Executive directly to the proposed delegates, being the specified powers Maritime Transport Act 1994 and the Resource Management Act 1991.

6        Authorises the Chief Executive to approve updates to the Chief Executive’s Delegations Manual.

7        Delegates to the General Manager, Regulatory Services:

(a)  The power to appoint enforcement officers under section 38 of the Resource Management Act 1991.

(b)  The power to issue warrants to enforcement officers.  This delegation is made pursuant to clause 32B of Schedule 7 of the Local Government Act 2002 and for avoidance of doubt is made having considered the matters under clause 32B(2) of Schedule 7 of the Local Government Act 2002.

(c)  The authority to determine to take enforcement action and/or prosecute a person for committing an offence Council is empowered to enforce (including Bylaws). 

 

1.        Introduction

Council has a range of powers and functions under various legislation as well as general administrative duties.  These powers and functions are generally delegated to the Chief Executive (as Council’s only direct employee appointment) and must be further delegated to Council officers to ensure that Council officers have the appropriate authority required to undertake their roles. 

The current Delegations Manual under which the Chief Executive and Council staff operate was put in place in 2015.  

The Delegations Manual should be reviewed on a regular basis to ensure that it is up to date with applicable legislation and captures all the necessary powers and functions that Council staff require to undertake Council activities and do so in a manner which is efficient and effective.    

In undertaking this review staff have focused in particular on ensuring that the proposed Delegations Manual:

•    includes all key legislation used by staff to carry out Council’s functions and powers, including new legislation and bylaws; 

•    contains clear policy direction and guidance on how delegations work and the circumstances in which they can be exercised;

•    consolidates all current delegations.  Since 2015 there have been a number of delegations made and having this consolidated within a single document will be more efficient and transparent;

•    covers practical scenarios to allow staff to effectively and efficiently carry out their roles where they have otherwise been constrained by limited or no delegations; and

•    contains sufficient flexibility to account for restructuring and job title changes.

 

1.1      Legislative Framework

Pursuant to clause 32 of Schedule 7 of the Local Government Act 2002, Council may delegate to an officer of the local authority any of its responsibilities, duties, or powers except those specifically retained by Council.  Council last made a general delegation to the Chief Executive in 2013. 

Staff recommend that a new general delegation to Council is resolved to ensure clarity as to the extent of the Chief Executive’s delegated powers.   The recommended delegation to the Chief Executive is set out at Appendix 1.

Pursuant to clause 32B of Schedule 7 of the Local Government Act 2002, a Council officer (in this case the Chief Executive) has the power to sub-delegate any authority delegated to the Chief Executive by Council.  The Delegations Manual is the practical exercise of this power and sets out the Chief Executive’s sub-delegations to Council officers pursuant to this clause.

There are certain delegations that must be made by Council to staff directly for example, delegations under the Resource Management Act 1991.   Delegations of this kind are included within the Delegations Manual for completeness with a caveat that they require a resolution of Council to be amended. 

Delegations under the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002 and Rating Valuations Act 1998 also fall within this category and Council resolved to delegate these powers and functions on 23 June 2022. They are included in the Delegations Manual for completeness.

 

1.2      Alignment with Strategic Framework

 

The Way We Work

We continually seek opportunities to innovate and improve.

 

1.2.1    Community Well-beings Assessment

Dominant Well-Beings Affected

¨ Environmental

 

¨ Cultural

 

¨ Social

 

¨ Economic

 

 

Appropriate delegations support the efficient delivery of all of Council’s work to improve the well-beings.

 

 

2.        Considerations

2.1      Risks and Mitigations

There are no significant risks associated with this matter.  The adoption of the new Chief Executive’s Delegations Manual will reduce risk to Council. 

2.2      Climate Change

The matters addressed in this report are of a procedural nature and there is no need to consider climate change impacts.

 

2.3      Implications for Māori

The matters addressed in this report are of a procedural nature and the impact on Māori is equivalent to the impact on the general community.

2.4      Community Engagement

The matters addressed in this report are of a procedural nature and do not require community engagement.

2.5      Financial Implications

There are no material unbudgeted financial implications and this fits within the allocated budget. 

3.        Next Steps

Upon acceptance of the recommendation, the Legal Team will take steps to socialise the updated Delegations Manual with staff so all council officers are aware of their powers and functions. 

Attachments

Attachment 1 - Recommended Delegation to the CE

Supporting Document 1 - Delegations Manual  

 

 


Regional Council                                                                                              29 September 2022

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Regional Council                                                                                              29 September 2022

 

Item 9.7

Supporting Document 1

Delegations Manual


 

 

 

Report To:

Regional Council

Meeting Date:

29 September 2022

Report Writer:

Mark Townsend, Engineering Manager

Report Authoriser:

Chris Ingle, General Manager, Integrated Catchments

Purpose:

For Council to consider additional budget requirement to complete Stage 6 Rangitāiki Floodway Project as part of the Rangitāiki Flood Protection Scheme.

 

 

Rangitāiki Flood Protection Scheme - Stage 6

 

Executive Summary

The Rangitāiki Floodway upgrade is a multi-stage project designed to take pressure off the flood prone Rangitāiki River by diverting some of its flow during significant weather events.

The construction of the swing gates (flood barriers) and other minor works are required to complete Stage 6. Additional budget provision is required to complete the works as a result of extra unavoidable costs incurred for Stage 6.

The additional budget needed will increase the loan balance currently held by the Rangitāiki-Tarawera Rivers Scheme. The September meeting of the Rangitāiki-Tarawera River Scheme Advisory Group discussed the implications of these additional costs on scheme ratepayers.

 

Recommendations

That the Regional Council:

1        Receives the report, Rangitāiki Flood Protection Scheme - Stage 6.

2        Approves the additional capital expenditure of $950,000 in the 2022/23 Annual Plan for the Rangitāiki Floodway Project, and that be loan funded;

3        Confirms the decision has a medium level of significance as determined by the Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy. Council has identified and assessed different options and considered community views as part of making the decision, in proportion to the level of significance.

 

1.        Introduction

The Rangitāiki Floodway upgrade is a multi-stage project designed to take pressure off the flood prone Rangitāiki River by diverting some of its flow during significant weather events.  A resource consent was obtained in 2009 increasing the capacity of the floodway to reduce flood levels in the Rangitāiki River from upstream of Edgecumbe to the river mouth.  Since 2011 the floodway channel has been widened, stopbanks have been raised and a second outlet channel created into the Rangitāiki River. Once upgrades are complete this will reduce pressure on Rangitāiki River stopbanks during large flood events.

Upgrading the floodway was originally proposed following an Edgecumbe stopbank breach in 2004. Another breach occurred in 2017 before the upgrades could be completed. Since 2017 Stages, 4, 5, and 7 have been completed. Stage 6 was largely completed in 2021/22 with only the swing gates (flood barriers) on McLean Road and McCracken Road to be completed along with some minor finishing work. The swing gates are scheduled for installation in March 2023 and the Stage 6 finishing work will be complete by June 2023.

The final stage of the floodway project is the upgrade to the spillway, the structure that allows increased diverted flow into the floodway. While originally planned for 2021/22 the timeframes for the work were extended due to the complexity and risks found in the modelling and design phase. The Spillway construction project has incurred a more comprehensive design requirement, and this will be reported to Council once a complete Engineers estimate is available.  The Spillway construction will complete the Floodway upgrade which was proposed following major flooding in 2004.

 

1.1      Legislative Framework

Under the Local Government Act 2002, regional authorities are responsible for the provision and control of river scheme assets. The Council manages and maintains the River Schemes under the Soil Conservation and Rivers Control Act 1941 and in keeping with its Rivers and Drainage Asset Management Plans. These plans include levels of service and flood protection that the Council provides for the community.

1.2      Alignment with Strategic Framework

 

Safe and Resilient Communities

We support community safety through flood protection and navigation safety.

A Vibrant Region

We invest appropriately in infrastructure to support sustainable development.

The Way We Work

We deliver value to our ratepayers and our customers.

 

1.2.1    Community Well-beings Assessment

Dominant Well-Beings Affected

þ Environmental

Medium - Positive

þ Cultural

Low - Positive

þ Social

Medium - Positive

þ Economic

Medium - Positive

The purpose of Local Government includes promoting the social, economic, environmental, and cultural well-being of communities in the present and for the future.

Identify which dominant Community Well-being(s) the project/proposal will affect.  Also indicate what level of impact and what effect the project/proposal will have on the relevant well-being(s).  For instance consider:

•  Will the project/proposal have a high, medium or low impact on the well-being(s)?

•  Are the effects of the impacts positive and/or negative? 

•  Describing simply the overall impact of the project/proposal.

•  Providing an explanation if there are positive and negative impacts for each well-being(s).

•  Identifying if your assessment of the actual or proposed impact is backed by evidence.

Also consider identifying if there are any relevant considerations against the Living Standards Framework.

Further guidelines available here.

 

1.3      Significance

The recommended proposal/decision has been assessed against the criteria and thresholds in Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy, and can be considered:

Medium

The decision is not within existing budgets and does not implement the current long term plan or annual plan.

The financial costs and implications of the decision are not yet known or provided for.

 

2.        Rangitāiki Floodway

2.1      Rangitāiki Floodway Stage 6

To access the options table, in the “Tools” pane click “Insert Text” “1 Options Table”, you can do this as many times as necessary.

Physical works are complete for stopbank sections of Stage 6. This stage comprised three distinct projects (Stage 6A, 6B and 6C) with a total budget of $10.9 million.

While Stages 6A and 6B were delivered to plan and to budget Stage 6C involved significantly more earthworks and geotechnical treatment than was originally envisaged, this portion of work was also paused for a time over winter which extended the work programme out over two construction seasons.

The major variations to budget for Stage 6C were impacted by the four key factors below.

Whakatāne District Council Road Restrictions ($127,000) - The Whakatāne District Council (WDC) has responsibility for local roads including maintenance. WDC was concerned about the impact over time for local rural roads due to the concentration of large vehicles and loads associated with the Rangitāiki Floodway project and other BOPRC works (such as the flood repair project). During the construction of Stage 6, WDC requested the diversion of construction vehicles from some local roads along with speed restrictions. The result of this has been additional cartage costs (longer route to site) and slower construction timeframes (machinery waiting longer for material).

Geotechnical Conditions ($280,0000) - Stage 6C geotechnical ground conditions were unlike those experienced for Stages 6A and 6B. During the construction phase ground inspections, the geotechnical engineer identified the need for significant deconstruction of the existing stopbank and footprint. This was in addition to what had been determined during the investigation phase. This unforeseen work along with greater than estimated ground settlement, material loses due to hauling and wet weather conditions all required additional construction earth to complete the project.

Work extended out over two construction seasons ($280,000) - Stage 6C estimates were based on the project being delivered over one construction season however due to delays with land access agreements and resource consent this stage was carried out over two construction seasons. Consequently, price increases and additional compensation payments were incurred.

Stage 6 Culverts ($258,000) – During construction additional culvert replacements were identified that needed replacement.

As a result of the above issues which amount to $945,000 the available budget was fully utilised and there was no carry forward funding available to complete Stage 6.

The swing gates (flood barriers across roads on McLean Road and McCracken Road) and some minor site finishing works were not completed in 2021/22. Additional budget provision is required in 2022/23 to complete these Stage 6 items as follows:

Item

Description

Budget Estimate

Stage 6

 

First gas section of Stage 6B to complete,

compensation owing, minor site finishing (fertiliser, reseeding areas etc).

 

$180,000

Swing Gates

Construction and installation

$770,000

Total

Increase in budget

$950,000

 

 

3.        Considerations

3.1      Risks and Mitigations

Key risks: explain what is unknown and possible financial, health and safety, reputational or environmental impacts could be. Include proposed mitigations. Cover the full range of risks. Consider: Health and Safety, Stakeholder, Legal, Financial, Trade-offs, Timing, and Communications. See Guideline material for details.

Identify the risks that will occur if the above decision is agreed upon vs the risks involved if the above decision is not agreed.

Identify how these risks will be mitigated or minimised.

If unsure or there is any doubt regarding the level of risk, please discuss with your GM.

The objective of the Rangitāiki Floodway is to reduce the known flood risk to community assets, property and livelihoods. The recommendations of this report will enable the floodway project to be advanced.

Stage 6 and the spillway have attracted Central Government funding as part of the Climate Resilience Programme ($10.275M). The recommendations of this report support that funding investment.

The construction industry is currently experiencing inflationary pressures along with increasing labour costs and materials supply.

Council has previously approved Stage 6 of the floodway within the LTP, and the detailed design of the swing gates are now complete.

 

3.2      Climate Change

The aim of this section is to ensure your thinking and assumptions around climate change are explicit and to provide visibility as to how our work relates to climate change. Consider:

·   Is the initiative sensitive to climate (e.g. changes in rainfall, temperature, wind, sea-level)? If so, what are the likely impacts and how have they been accounted for?

·   In what way does the initiative relate to climate change (use the building block below to illustrate)?

·   Which of the guiding principles does the initiative encompass in relation to climate change (see the detailed guidance for information on these principles)? Provide more detail where appropriate.

Use the building block below when considering Climate Change implications.

Crtl + click for guideline material.

The outcome of these projects respond directly to the effects of climate change and have been considered as part of their inclusion in the LTP.

The matters addressed in this report are of a procedural nature and there is no need to consider climate change impacts.

 

3.3      Implications for Māori

Council has responsibilities to Māori under the LGA and the RMA. We are required to meet those responsibilities and identify any potential implications for Māori.  Please consider including this section for reports going to all committees.  The following questions will aid your analysis:

·   Are there any positive or negative effects on Māori (social, cultural or economic)?

·   What consultation/engagement has been undertaken with Māori and what form did it take? How did Māori contribute to this decision?

·   Does the issue require consideration of: iwi planning documents, Treaty settlement legislation or any other document expressing matters of importance to Māori?

Crtl + click for Guideline material.

The Stage 6 of the Rangitāiki Floodway Upgrade has been the subject of direct consultation with Ngāti Awa and Ngāti Tūwharetoa (BOP) as part of the wider Rangitāiki Floodway Project. Consultation was also undertaken for resource consent and archaeological purposes.

Ngāti Awa and Ngāti Tūwharetoa (BOP) are supportive of the flood protection measures the Regional Council has undertaken and have planned for the Rangitāiki River and surrounds.

 

3.4      Community Engagement

What level of engagement is council commited to? What actions will be taken

Consider identifying in the report:

• Council’s knowledge of community views on the subject.

• What aspect of the community is involved.

• How the views of the community were obtained.

• How the views were recorded and reported.

Adobe Systems

INFORM

Whakamōhio

To provide affected communities with balanced and objective information to assist them in understanding the problems, alternatives and/or solutions.

 

The Rangitāiki Floodway project has been the subject of substantial consultation with Rangitāiki River Communities.

The additional costs incurred for Stage 6 have been reported to the Rangitāiki-Tarawera River Advisory Group and their feedback sought. This was not available in time for the finalisation of this paper. It is proposed to provide this verbally when this paper is presented.

 

3.5      Financial Implications

If the recommendation is adopted by Council, will it result in:

-   Unbudgeted work during the current financial year?

-   Unbudgeted work for any of the years remaining in the current Long Term Plan?

If the answer is ‘no’ to both questions please select the dropdown option 1 and complete appropriately.

If the answer is ‘yes’ to either question please select “Budget Implications” in the building block below and liaise with your Management Accountant in order to complete the Financial Impact table.

Please refer to the relevant analysis below.

This decision will increase the loan balance for the Rangitāiki Tarawera Rivers Scheme by $950,000. The loan balance for the Scheme as at 1 July 2022 was $41.84M and the asset value for the Scheme was $126M. The term of river scheme loans is 20 years.

While central government funding of $10.275M was granted for Stage 6 and the spillway, this grant sum is fixed.

It is estimated that $46,000 of operational costs associated with the additional $950,000 loan will be incurred in 2022/23. These have not been budgeted for and will need to be funded by the Rangitāiki Tarawera Rivers Scheme Reserves as rates have been set for 2022/23. There are sufficient reserves to cover the additional 2022/23 operational costs. For years 2023/24 onwards, the operational costs will be funded 80% by Targeted rates, and 20% General funds.

 

4.        Next Steps

Next Steps: What next? What resources are needed? Further analysis? Timeframes ahead. Any consultation planned. Remind Council of the process ahead. Next update to Council?

Conclusion: Short concluding remarks. Referring back to recommendations. No new content.

The following next steps will ensure the Stage 6 is completed by 30 June 2023.

 

Adopt Procurement Plan (this meeting agenda)

Manage minor site works – from October 2022

Roading Authority Approval granted – November 2022

Tender Swing Gate works – December 2022

Manage Swing Gate works on site – from March 2023

 


 

 

 

Report To:

Regional Council

Meeting Date:

29 September 2022

Report Writer:

Mark Townsend, Engineering Manager

Report Authoriser:

Chris Ingle, General Manager, Integrated Catchments

Purpose:

For Council to approve the Procurement Plan for Rivers and Drainage Capital Works 2022/23

 

 

Procurement Plan for Rivers and Drainage Capital Works 2022/23

 

Executive Summary

This paper seeks approval for the Procurement Plan (Attachment 1) relating to capital works projects for 2022/23 in the Rivers and Drainage Schemes Activity as budgeted in the Long Term Plan 2021-2031 and Annual Plan 2022/23.

The Council’s procurement approach is based on good practice guidance for the public sector, including social procurement consideration. The approach sees approval for the proposed method of procurement before going to the market. The proposed outcome of the procurement process is tender then engage the most appropriate contactors to undertake the physical works as required.

It is recommended that the Council delegate to the Chief Executive the authority to approve the award of any contract, and to execute the contracts with the successful tenderer for each of the projects included in the Procurement Plan provided that each tender is within its approved budget as set out in the Long Term Plan 2021-2031.

 

Recommendations

That the Regional Council:

1        Receives the report, Procurement Plan for Rivers and Drainage Capital Works 2022/23;

2        Approves the attached Procurement Plan for Rivers and Drainage Capital Works 2022/23.

3        Approves going to market to invite tenders for the capital works projects as set out in the attached Procurement Plan;

4        Delegates to the Chief Executive the financial authority to accept tenders and approve contracts, supplier selections and payments in exceedance of $400,000, including contact variations and renewals for each capital project, providing the tender price is within the approved capital project budgets as set out in the Long Term Plan 2021-2031 or Annual Plan 2022/23.

 

1.        Introduction

It is recommended good practice in New Zealand for organisations to gain approval on their method of procurement before going to the market. The Council’s procurement framework is based on this good practice guidance for the public sector. This paper reflects a very similar approach taken this time last year for last year’s rivers and drainage capital programme for Toi Moana.

It is considered efficient to produce one procurement plan that covers the majority of the River and Drainage capital works for the coming year. This approach is adopted to support planning for the year ahead and avoid construction delays. The plan allows for approaches to market that provide for the Lower Rangitāiki River Stopbank Upgrade, Tarawera River Stopbank Upgrade, Rangitāiki Floodway Stage 6 Swing Gates and the Whakatāne River Floodwalls and Seepage control.

1.1      Legislative Framework

Under the Local Government Act 2002, regional authorities are responsible for the provision and control of river scheme assets. The Council manages and maintains the River Schemes under the Soil Conservation and Rivers Control Act 1941 and in keeping with its Rivers and Drainage Asset Management Plans. These plans include levels of service that the Council provides for the community, which drive the upgrade, replacement and development of scheme assets.

1.2      Alignment with Strategic Framework

 

Safe and Resilient Communities

We support community safety through flood protection and navigation safety.

A Vibrant Region

We invest appropriately in infrastructure to support sustainable development.

1.2.1    Community Well-beings Assessment

Dominant Well-Beings Affected

þ Environmental

Low - Positive

þ Cultural

Low - Positive

þ Social

High - Positive

þ Economic

High - Positive


The decisions recommended in this paper support the delivery and procurement of capital projects and promote organisational efficiency.

 

2.        Procurement Planning

2.1      Rivers and Drainage Schemes Capital Works 2022/23

This report seeks approval for the Procurement Plan relating to 2022/23 capital works projects in the Rivers and Drainage Schemes. The projects have been grouped into one Procurement Plan and provides for the procurement of one project which is partly Government funded as part of the Climate Resilience Programme. The procurement plan establishes the method of engagement of suitably qualified and experienced contractors with the skills and resources necessary to carry out planned works. The plan outlines the projects covered, external funding sources, the contract type, method of procurement, the tendering process, evaluation methodology, risks associated with the procurement and roles and responsibilities.

The proposed outcome of this procurement process is to engage the most appropriate contractors to undertake the physical works, in keeping with the evaluation method.

The estimated value of the individual construction contracts contained in the procurement plan will exceed the Chief Executives delegation of $400,000. For this reason, staff recommend to Council to delegate to the Chief Executive the authority to approve the award of contract and to execute the contracts with the successful tenderers for each of the projects, provided they are within the proposed contract budget for 2022/23 and the Long Term Plan 2021-2031.

3.        Considerations

3.1      Risks and Mitigations

 

Rivers and Drainage Capital Works 2021/22 Procurement Plan Risks and Mitigations

Risk

Mitigation

Tender prices exceed budget

Engineering Estimate

Provisions of NZS 3910:2013 Conditions of contract for building and civil engineering construction

Limited capability in the market 

Open Tender

Evaluation method

Low number of suppliers

Open Tender

GETS (Government Electronic Tender Service) used to advertise and manage the tender process

Time constraints to tender

GETS (Government Electronic Tender Service) used to advertise and manage the tender process

BOPRC Procurement Team support

Reputation risk

GETS (Government Electronic Tender Service) used to advertise and manage the tender process

BOPRC Procurement Team support

3.2      Climate Change

The aim of this section is to ensure your thinking and assumptions around climate change are explicit and to provide visibility as to how our work relates to climate change. Consider:

·   Is the initiative sensitive to climate (e.g. changes in rainfall, temperature, wind, sea-level)? If so, what are the likely impacts and how have they been accounted for?

·   In what way does the initiative relate to climate change (use the building block below to illustrate)?

·   Which of the guiding principles does the initiative encompass in relation to climate change (see the detailed guidance for information on these principles)? Provide more detail where appropriate.

Use the building block below when considering Climate Change implications.

Crtl + click for guideline material.

These projects are designed to support climate change adaptation in our communities. The matters addressed in this report are of a procedural nature and there is no need to consider climate change impacts.

 

3.3      Implications for Māori

Council has responsibilities to Māori under the LGA and the RMA. We are required to meet those responsibilities and identify any potential implications for Māori.  Please consider including this section for reports going to all committees.  The following questions will aid your analysis:

·   Are there any positive or negative effects on Māori (social, cultural or economic)?

·   What consultation/engagement has been undertaken with Māori and what form did it take? How did Māori contribute to this decision?

·   Does the issue require consideration of: iwi planning documents, Treaty settlement legislation or any other document expressing matters of importance to Māori?

Crtl + click for Guideline material.

The Council has a responsibility to manage the risks posed by our major rivers, particularly those included in the council’s flood and drainage control schemes. Our Bay of Plenty Iwi have an inherent interest in the long-term health and management of our rivers and waterways. The flood mitigation and environmental work encompassed by these projects are fundamentally of interest to Māori as kaitiaki and individual projects require specific engagement and consultation with Iwi partners.

 

3.4      Community Engagement

What level of engagement is council commited to? What actions will be taken

Consider identifying in the report:

• Council’s knowledge of community views on the subject.

• What aspect of the community is involved.

• How the views of the community were obtained.

• How the views were recorded and reported.

Engagement with the community is not required as the recommended proposal / decision relates to internal Council matters only. The particular projects outlined here require indiviual and specific community engagement and consultation.

 

3.5      Financial Implications

If the recommendation is adopted by Council, will it result in:

-   Unbudgeted work during the current financial year?

-   Unbudgeted work for any of the years remaining in the current Long Term Plan?

If the answer is ‘no’ to both questions please select the dropdown option 1 and complete appropriately.

If the answer is ‘yes’ to either question please select “Budget Implications” in the building block below and liaise with your Management Accountant in order to complete the Financial Impact table.

The Rivers and Drainage Activity capital works programme is provided for in the Long Term Plan 2021-2031, and Annual Plan 2022/23. There are no budget implications associated with the adoption of the attached Rivers and Drainage Activity Capital Works Procurement Plan 2022/23.

Procurement Item

Estimated work commencement

Procurement reference

Budgeted    cost of procurement (000)

Lower Rangitāiki River Stopbank Upgrade

November 2022

2020-0112

$2,850

Tarawera River Stopbank Upgrade

March 2023

TBA

$650

Whakatane Floodwalls Seepage Control

February 2023

TBA

$5,489

Stage 6 Rangitāiki Floodway Swing Gates

March 2023

CON000426

$770

Table 1 – Procurement plan items 2022/23

 

4.        Next Steps

Next Steps: What next? What resources are needed? Further analysis? Timeframes ahead. Any consultation planned. Remind Council of the process ahead. Next update to Council?

Conclusion: Short concluding remarks. Referring back to recommendations. No new content.

The approval of the attached Procurement Plan will allow for efficiencies in approaching the market, timely award and contract delivery commencement, provided budget requirements are met.

Capital works progress will be reported regularly through the Monitoring and Operations Committee and to the relevant river scheme advisory group.

Attachments

Attachment 1 - Procurement Plan for 2022-23 Capital Works (R&D)   


Regional Council                                                                                              29 September 2022

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Report To:

Regional Council

Meeting Date:

29 September 2022

Report Writer:

Kirsty Brown, Rivers and Drainage Assets Manager

Report Authoriser:

Chris Ingle, General Manager, Integrated Catchments

Purpose:

To seek approval of the 2022/23 infrastructure insurance renewal process.

 

 

Infrastructure Insurance Renewal

 

Executive Summary

Since 2009 Council has procured its insurance policies through the Bay of Plenty Shared Services Ltd (BOPLASS) joint procurement forum. This joint procurement provides benefits to Council, including reduced premium costs.

During the past year, Rivers and Drainage infrastructure insurance value has increased from $425 million to $455 million.  On this basis, Aon have advised that the estimated premium will be approximately $800,000 which exceeds the Chief Executive’s financial delegation. Budget provision of $880,000 has been made for the current financial year.

The 2022/2023 renewal procedure is underway and approval is sought for the payment process for this year’s premium, including delegating authority to the Chief Executive to accept and approve payment of the 2022/2023 annual infrastructure insurance premium.

 

Recommendations

That the Regional Council:

1        Receives the report, Infrastructure Insurance Renewal.

2        Delegates to the Chief Executive, authority to approve and pay the 2022/23 annual infrastructure insurance premium.

 

1.        Introduction

Council procures its insurance through the BOPLASS insurance forum which enables insurance cover to be obtained with the benefits of group purchasing.  Aon is the appointed BOPLASS insurance forum’s brokers.

During the past year the Rivers and Drainage infrastructure insurance value has increased to $455 million. On this basis, Aon have advised that the estimated premium for 2022/2023 will be approximately $800,000 which exceeds the Chief Executive’s financial delegation. This quantum however is within the amount budgeted in the current LTP for insurance cover.

The timeframe for receiving quotes and placing insurance cover is extremely tight. To meet the 1 November 2022 renewal date, delegated authority is sought for the Chief Executive to approve and pay the 2022/23 annual infrastructure insurance premium.

1.1      Alignment with Strategic Framework

 

Safe and Resilient Communities

We support community safety through flood protection and navigation safety.

A Vibrant Region

We invest appropriately in infrastructure to support sustainable development.

The Way We Work

We deliver value to our ratepayers and our customers.

1.1.1    Community Well-beings Assessment

Dominant Well-Beings Affected

þ Environmental

 

þ Cultural

 

þ Social

 

þ Economic

 

 

Floods are New Zealand’s most regular and significant natural hazard. Our river and drainage schemes provide flood protection and land drainage to some of the most productive land and inhabited areas in the region. Flood protection infrastructure provides assurance to the region’s economy and local communities.

Our river and drainage schemes provide important, long term infrastructure which supports our community by protecting people, property and livelihoods from flooding and land drainage issues.  This is vital to the wellbeing of our river scheme communities.

 

2.        Infrastructure Insurance Renewal 2022/23

2.1      Current Insurance Arrangements

In the event of a natural disaster, central government will pay up to 60% of repair costs for essential infrastructure.  This arrangement is conditional on the local authority being able to show that the damaged assets have been properly maintained and that the local authority can meet the remaining 40% e.g. setting aside reserves or insurance cover. 

Council achieves its 40% share via flood damage reserves and infrastructure insurance cover.  This is obtained on the international markets through the BOPLASS forum. It covers Council’s flood protection and drainage assets for damage caused by earthquake, natural landslip, flood, tsunami, tornado, volcanic eruption, hydrothermal and geothermal activity, subterranean fire and business interruption. 

Total value of loss covered is $500M for the BOPLASS group, however for BOPRC there is a sub-loss limit of $60M (meaning that even though the overall cover for the group is $500M, BOPRC can only claim up to $24M in an event, this figure being 40% of $60M).  There is also a $1.5M ($600,000 @40%) excess for each claim. 

BOPRC’s infrastructure premium for 2021/22 was $734,877 (for the year 30 October 2021 to 1 November 2022) across all schemes based on asset value.

2.2      Valuation and Premium

Council has a formal process of updating Rivers and Drainage asset valuation data on an annual basis.  The primary purpose of the valuation is to provide information for insurance purposes and to calculate the level of capital depreciation.

As well as market conditions driving premium costs up, there has also been an increase in our rivers and drainage asset values which also impacts the infrastructure insurance premium. The increases in assets value are due to:

·      Increased construction costs.

·      LTP/Annual Plan capital works programme.

·      Improved asset data.  

During the past year, Rivers and Drainage infrastructure insurance value has increased from $425 million to $455 million.  On this basis, Aon have advised that the estimated premium will be approximately $800,000 which exceeds the Chief Executive’s financial delegation. Budget provision of $880,000 is in place.

The timeframe for receiving quotes and placing insurance cover is very tight, with only a two week period between quotes being available and the insurance cover needing to be placed. To meet the 1 November 2022 renewal date, we are seeking delegated authority to the Chief Executive to approve and pay the 2022/2023 annual infrastructure insurance premium.

2.3      Infrastructure Insurance Review

In 2021 a review of how we insure our flood protection and drainage assets was undertaken by Aon and Tonkin & Taylor.  Based on the findings from the flood risk modelling, the conclusion was to remain with the status quo, i.e. with professional insurers.

The results of the infrastructure insurance review was presented to the 21 October 2021 Risk & Assurance Committee for consideration. In summary:

·      Council’s 2021/22 infrastructure insurance premium of $734,877 is currently the most cost-effective risk financing for flood losses.

·      This cover provide cover for other natural hazards events other than flooding (earthquake, tsunami, tornado, volcanic eruption).

·      To self insure, the modelling determined the minimum amount to self-insure for flood risk would be $1 million per year, but a more prudent reserve contribution would be $1.5 million per year.

Careful monitoring and ongoing analysis of Council’s asset risk, central government policies and local government reforms will be ongoing to ensure professional insurance remains the most effective option. 

                                                                                  

3.        Considerations

3.1      Risks and Mitigations

If the 1 November 2022 renewal date is missed, significant infrastructure will be uninsured for natural events.  To mitigate against this risk, delegated authority if sough for the Chief Executive to meet the 1 November 2022 deadline.

3.2      Climate Change

Climate change predictions include rising sea levels and greater frequency and intensity of extreme weather events.  In light of these predictions, Council recognises the importance of managing existing flood protection and drainage infrastructure assets, and that long term flood resilience planning is required. This also includes implementing effective adaptations and promoting new catchment and river management approaches.

3.3      Implications for Māori

Our flood protection and land drainage activity is vital to our role of providing services that support safe and resilient communities. This includes well-being benefits for Māori and our river scheme work often supports the strong spiritual bonds Māori have to awa, whenua and the natural world. Operationally, our current environmental code of practice recognises and provides for iwi management planning and other means of involving Māori in decision making within river environments.

Council acknowledges that relationships it has with Māori are central to the fulfilment of its statutory responsibilities and will continue to utilise a range of different mechanisms to engage with the wider Māori community and ensure Māori values and interests are appropriately represented in the decision-making process

3.4      Community Engagement

 

Adobe Systems

INFORM